Youth Chorus Holding Auditions, Adding Teen Boys’ Choir

first_imgNew this year, OYC is starting a young men’s choir for those with changed voices. Please contact Artistic Director Cynthia Dinsmore, 360.943.6179, for audition information. Olympia Youth Chorus (OYC) – with singers from Thurston, Grays Harbor and Lewis counties – is currently holding auditions for the 2012-2013 performance season. OYC is a nonprofit, vocal music program. It serves singers in K-12 throughout the greater South Sound community. Detailed audition information is supplied below or interested parties can visit the OYC website at www.OlympiaYouthChorus.org. OYC singers are from public and private schools, as well as home-schooled. In addition to local performances, choirs have performed in England, Hawaii, San Francisco and New York’s Lincoln Center. Annually about 150 girls and boys participate. Over 900 singers have participated in the program over the last 17 years. Facebook0Tweet0Pin0last_img read more

E. L. Wiegand Foundation Awards More Than $400,000 To Saint Martin’s…

first_imgLACEY, WASHINGTON — E. L. Wiegand Foundation of Reno, Nevada, has awarded a grant in the amount of $424,532 to the Engineering Initiative at Saint Martin’s University. The gift has been designated for laboratory and IT equipment as well as furnishings for the new industrial laboratory building, which will complement the new Cebula Hall in The Hal and Inge Marcus School of Engineering. To commemorate the gift, the laboratories in the new lab building will be named the “E. L. Wiegand Engineering Laboratories.”“This grant greatly enhances the quality of education and research experienced by all students who enter the E. L. Wiegand Engineering Laboratories,” says University President Roy F. Heynderickx, Ph.D. “We are much indebted to the Foundation for its generosity.”The new engineering laboratory building, nicknamed “The Lab in the Woods,” will house the laboratories for soils, civil engineering materials, manufacturing, robotics and fluids, as well as a wind tunnel, project work space and senior project display space.The grant was approved on Oct. 19, 2012, by the Trustees of the E. L. Wiegand Foundation. One component includes a hydraulic testing system, which is a universal testing machine that performs tension, compression and bending tests up to 100 tons, and a 2D/3D Stereoscopic Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) System. The PIV fluids measurement equipment will be used for experiments in conjunction with the wind tunnel and fluids lab to measure aerodynamic characteristics. Both systems will be valuable tools for civil and mechanical engineering classes. Additionally, the grant will provide for all the furnishings and IT infrastructure in the lab building.“We are very grateful and honored to have received this grant from the E. L. Wiegand Foundation,” says Zella Kahn-Jetter, Ph.D., P.E., dean of The Hal and Inge Marcus School of Engineering. “The equipment will set Saint Martin’s apart from other engineering schools. Our students will have the ability to do state-of-the-art testing, design and research.”“The education and experience students receive from using this equipment will be tremendous,” adds Kahn-Jetter. “The E. L. Wiegand Foundation is enabling The Hal and Inge Marcus School of Engineering to become a premier engineering institute in the state of Washington.”Mr. Edwin L. Wiegand invented the electric heating element in the early 1900s, and went on to found the Edwin L. Wiegand company in Pittsburgh, Pa., to manufacture resistance heating units. Under the trade name “Chromalox,” he developed and manufactured heating elements for home appliances and industrial uses. In the 1970s, he became active in Miami Oil Producers, Inc., an operator of oil and gas properties in the United States and Canada, based in Reno, Nevada. The E. L. Wiegand Engineering Laboratories honor the memory of Mr. Wiegand and the important contributions he made as a scientist, inventor, businessman, leader and generous philanthropist. Saint Martin’s University is an independent four-year, coeducational university located on a 380-acre wooded campus in Lacey, Washington. Established in 1895 by the Catholic Order of Saint Benedict, the University is one of 14 Benedictine colleges and universities in the United States and Canada, and the only one west of the Rocky Mountains. Saint Martin’s University prepares students for successful lives through its 23 majors and seven graduate programs spanning the liberal arts, business, education, nursing and engineering. Saint Martin’s welcomes more than 1,100 undergraduate students and 375 graduate students from many ethnic and religious backgrounds to its main campus, and 300 more undergraduate students to its extension campuses located at Joint Base Lewis-McChord and Centralia College. Visit the Saint Martin’s University website at www.stmartin.edu. Facebook10Tweet0Pin0last_img read more

Port Of Olympia Earns Return on Solar Power Investment

first_imgThe Port of Olympia added 48 solar panels to the roof of its 76,000 sq. ft. Marine Terminal warehouse in 2011. This is a private investment rather than a community solar project, and uses components locally manufactured in Marysville, Wash. June 2013 marked the end of Puget Sound Energy’s fiscal year and the results of the Port’s energy investment are positive! The solar power system generated a total return of $5,581 for the Port since July 2012. The Port more than met the design goal of maximizing Puget Sound Energy’s energy harvesting incentive of $5,000. In addition, the panels generated 9,687 KWh of electricity, reducing the Port’s energy costs by $581. Combined, the earnings provide a 5.5% return on the Port’s investment.When the Port planned to replace the roof of the then 25 year-old warehouse in 2010, alternatives that would decrease operating costs and increase environmental benefits were a high priority. Energy efficient lighting had already been installed. The Port selected the PVC roof and the stainless steel gutters to reduce the impact on stormwater run-off to Budd Inlet. The Port selected solar panels with a goal of making the warehouse close to energy neutral. The southern face of the warehouse roof is nearly perfectly aligned with the sun for solar installations. The number of panels (48) provides the best return on the investment.A testament to the significance of the renovated, solar-powered warehouse to the community was its selection by Northwest Eco Building Guild for the 2011 South Sound Solar Tour. Facebook27Tweet0Pin0last_img read more

Jacob Libby Pursues His Lifelong Dream to Fly with Gusto

first_imgBy Gail WoodThis is where Jacob Libby’s inspiring story begins, in the cockpit of a single-engine airplane.At age eight, Libby, sitting next to his dad in the co-pilot’s seat, has his hands on the plane’s controls. He’s flying the plane for the first time, doing something as a second grader few adults ever do.Jacob Libby earned his pilot’s license on his 16th birthday. Now 27, Libby is a professional pilot.“My son has always been infatuated with flying,” said Nick Libby, Jacob’s father.But Jacob’s infatuation didn’t stop with a dream. He’s achieved. Like few others ever have.By the time Jacob graduated from North Thurston High School in 2004, he was already a licensed flight instructor, the youngest in the entire country.  After school, Jacob headed each day to the Olympia Airport to teach. One of his students was a 52-year-old man.On his 16th birthday, Jacob soloed in his dad’s 150 Cessna, earning him his pilot’s license. Because he didn’t have his driver’s license yet, his mom drove him to the Olympia Airport that day. After he soloed, she then drove him home for dinner.With his eyes on the end goal – his dream was to become a corporate pilot – Jacob went to the airport nearly every day throughout high school. Stormy weather was about the only thing that kept him on the ground.But sometimes even on those bad weather days, he’d fly because his students needed to fly in bad weather to earn their instrument rating.“He became obsessed with flying,” Nick said.By the time Jacob graduated from high school, he already had 1,200 hours flying time. He was only 18. It was the most flight hours for someone his age in the world.“I worked my butt off,” Jacob said.Jacob Libby earned his hot air balloon rating at age 22.He sacrificed a lot. Instead of hanging out at the neighbor’s house, playing video games with friends or watching TV – doing kid things – Jacob flew.“I had a lot of friends who wanted to be a pilot,” Jacob said. “But it takes a lot of work, a lot of studying.”Initially, his friends were drawn by the fun – flying. But they turned away when they saw the work. But Jacob stayed on task. Since his dad was a flight instructor and had his own plane, Jacob had both the teacher and the access.“I never pushed him,” Nick said. “It’s just something he always wanted to do.”After high school, Jacob had another dream-come-true moment when he was accepted to Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University in Daytona Beach. Jacob was granted an exception to take the class online, allowing him to stay in Olympia and continue his flight instruction classes for three students.At 20, Jacob got another amazing opportunity when he was hired to be the chief pilot of a cooperate airplane owned by two local businessmen. Flying a twin engine Beechcraft King Air, Jacob flew all over the West Coast.When he was still 18, Jacob got his commercial C plan rating. When he turned 19, he earned his commercial glider rating. At 22, he was granted his commercial hot air balloon rating. At 23, he got his certificate to fly the Ford Ty motor, which is the oldest airliner in the world.Jacob Libby is a third generation pilot.Also at 23, he got his glider instructor license. At 24, he got his commercial gyro plane flight instructor certification. At 25, he received his Boeing 737 captain’s license.To get his his captain’s license, Jacob “flew” in a simulator, a mock instructional machine that simulates flying a 737 jet. It has the same control panel, cockpit and a computerized image of the scenery.  Jacob got a break when he was able to use the Alaska Airlines simulator at Boeing Field. Jacob’s instructor had approval to do the ride alongs and testing portions of the training.Jacob realized another lifelong dream when at age 26 he was hired to be a commercial pilot. He was hired by Compass Airline, which is owned by Delta Airlines, and flew out of Minneapolis, Minn., across the U.S. Not wanting to move from Olympia, Jacob commuted from SeaTac Airport to Minneapolis to start his work day. He’d work three days and then return home.Jacob’s infatuation with earning certifications hasn’t ended. In early December, he was up in a helicopter working on his helicopter certifications. He’s doing his training flights in Bremerton. To get there, he flies, cutting his commute time for the 90-mile trip.When he graduated from high school, Jacob Libby had 1,200 hours flying time. He was only 18 and it was the most flight hours for someone his age in the world.In June, Jacob, now 27, got another dream job when he was hired to fly a cooperate jet for a big cooperation in Seattle. Of the 5,000 applicants for one position, Jacob got the offer.“I’m really the luckiest pilot in the country,” Jacob said.Perhaps. But Jacob has also worked like no one else in the country. With his new job, two weeks ago, he flew to Finland. He was supposed to fly to Brazil last week but the flight was canceled. In the next couple of weeks, he’ll fly to Alaska and another crew will take the passengers to Hong Kong. There’s a trip to Chile that he hopes to take in the next couple of weeks.“I’ve been so consumed by this for the last 10 years,” Jacob said. “But I haven’t lost my excitement.”Jacob is a third generation pilot. His grandfather, Nick’s dad, got his pilot’s license in 1949 in Olympia. Nick earned his pilot’s license when he was 18.“I’m proud of him,” said Nick, who flew for Federal Express. “He’s worked hard. It’s quite an accomplishment.” Facebook265Tweet0Pin0last_img read more

New Saint Martin’s Certificate in Software Systems Opens Career Opportunities

first_imgFacebook0Tweet0Pin0Submitted by Saint Martin’s University Saint Martin’s University will begin offering a new Certificate in Software Systems at its Lacey campus in late October, building on the success of its Microsoft Software and Systems Academy, a program currently offered in partnership with the Microsoft Corp. at the University’s Extension Campus at Joint Base Lewis-McChord’s Stone Education Center. The new certificate program is primarily designed to serve active-duty military and veterans but also will be open to others in the community, says David Olwell, Ph.D., dean of the University’s Hal and Inge Marcus School of Engineering. Final program approval was recently received from the Northwest Commission on Colleges and Universities, making it fully eligible for financial aid through the Veterans Administration.Dean of the University’s Extended Learning Division Radana Dvorak, who has been instrumental in the program’s success at JBLM, said, “I am absolutely delighted that the NWCCU approved the certificate program and grateful to all my colleagues for working so hard to get this off the ground. It’s great news for our wider community population that includes so many veterans, service members and others who stand to benefit from this opportunity.” Olwell says the one-semester certificate course will be offered in the University’s new Panowicz Foundry for Innovation and the E. L. Wiegand Laboratories. Microsoft has equipped the classroom with cutting-edge computers and software. For veterans who have earned their certification, Microsoft also provides a comprehensive program to support employment readiness, including individual mentoring.Since it was launched in 2013, the certificate program at JBLM has proved highly successful, with 98 percent of its 141 graduates now employed in the industry. “They are successfully placed in excellent-paying, high-tech jobs with major employers such as Microsoft, Google, Amazon, and other industry leaders,” Olwell said. “The University expects to prepare students for similar career-focused success through this new certificate program on campus.”The first cohort of students on the University’s Lacey campus will begin in late October, and the next in February. In January, Saint Martin’s will begin a 42-week evening/weekend cohort, Olwell said. About 20 students will be enrolled in each group.For more information or to begin the application process, interested veterans and active-duty military can contact Robert Bone, manager of the Microsoft Academy at Saint Martin’s JBLM extension campus, 253-964-4688; rbone@stmartin.edu. Others interested in the Lacey campus program can contact Computer Science Chair Mario Guimaraes, Ph.D., 360-688-2662;MGuimaraes@stmartin.edu.last_img read more

Northwest Farm Credit Service Grant For International Mermaid Museum

first_imgFacebook32Tweet0Pin0Submitted by Westport WineryThe non-profit International Mermaid Museum was awarded a $1000 grant this week from Northwest Farm Credit Services headquartered in Spokane, Washington. Museum founder Kim Roberts said, “This grant is special since it will allow us to feature a display on oyster farming here on the Washington Coast. We will tie it back to the story of Ben-Varrey mermaids from Scotland.”The museum has a clear mission of teaching ocean ecology from seashore to sea floor immersed in mermaid mythology. Roberts said, “Our board of directors believes offering these lessons within the mythology of merfolk will allow the museum to engage all ages in a fun and unique manner. When you look around the world, virtually all seafaring nations have mermaid lore. This is one of those things that unites different cultures.”The museum’s grant application was sponsored by Stan and Jill Schwartz Farms in Reardan, Washington. A portion of the proceeds from spirits crafted by Ocean’s Daughter Distillery are donated to support the museum. The distillery will release a new whiskey made from Washington white winter wheat grown on the Schwartz farm later this year. Ben-Varrey is the name of their Irish cream liqueur.This is the first museum in the world dedicated to mermaids. It will be constructed on the grounds of Westport Winery Garden Resort on the Washington Coast. This is also home to Ocean’s Daughter Distillery.This is the second grant awarded to the museum. The first came from the Awesome Foundation in the amount of $750.Inquiries about making financial donations or items to include in the display are encouraged by emailing info@mermaidmuseum.org.last_img read more

Romelu Lukaku’s Inter Milan debut delayed due to overweight return to United preseason

first_imgAdvertisement hq8ffNBA Finals | Brooklyn Vs93zWingsuit rodeo📽Sindre E102( IG: @_aubreyfisher @imraino ) 38oz87Would you ever consider trying this?😱3ymCan your students do this? 🌚jxshRoller skating! Powered by Firework Romelu Lukaku’s recent transfer from Manchester United to Inter Milan of roughly 80mil shook the transfer window recently but Inter Milan have got more than they bought – Romelu Lukaku and the additional weight the Belgian has put on in preseason.Advertisement Media sources report the former Chelsea, West Brom and Everton forward rocked up at the San Siro from Old Trafford weighing 104kg.Advertisement Conte and his staff instructed the powerhouse to get himself down to the 100kg mark before the start of the season.United legend Gary Neville recently tweeted: “He admitted he was overweight ! He is over 100kg! He’s a Manchester United player!Advertisement “He will score goals and do well at Inter Milan but unprofessionalism is contagious.”Lukaku has been the talisman for United and Belgium in recent years and will hope to continue his prolific form for Juventus. Advertisementlast_img read more

Netizens troll Sarfaraz Ahmed after Misbah-ul-Haq imposes strict rules on diet

first_imgAdvertisement 68lkNBA Finals | Brooklyn Vs77ldWingsuit rodeo📽Sindre E3x6n( IG: @_aubreyfisher @imraino ) 4634zep2Would you ever consider trying this?😱5urtCan your students do this? 🌚1Roller skating! Powered by Firework Pakistan head coach and former batsman Misbah-ul-Haq, has decided to ban biryani and other oil-based red meat dishes for his team to help his players get back into shape. The decision was imposed after the team was declared as one of the most ‘unfit’ sides in the world and the social media didn’t hold back to troll on this issue including their plus sized captain Sarfaraz Ahmed.Advertisement During the 2019 World Cup many people raised questions regarding the Pakistani team’s diet and fitness including their former pacer Shoaib Akhtar, who even called skipper Sarfaraz Ahmed as a ‘fat and unfit’ player after the loss against West Indies in the tournament opener. To make the matter even worse, there were some rumours that the team was seen eating junk food ahead of their match against arch-rivals India. Following their loss in that match, one crying fan complained that the Pakistani cricket board wasn’t aware of the fitness issues in the team. Therefore, Misbah’s decision to ban fat from the diet chart can prove to be a crucial step to reorganize the team under his guidance.Advertisement Our new coach “Misbah ul haq” has banned “Biryani” for cricket team . Oh man! He isn’t coming slow 🔥😎😂#PCB #Misbahulhaq— Wania hassan🇵🇰 (@Kathrin_bridges) September 17, 2019However, the Pakistani people’s love for biryani is a widely known fact and it seems that the cricketers will now have to adjust a life without this delicious item on their menu. But for the netizens, this incident was another opportunity to take a dig at the players on social media. Advertisementlast_img read more

Sea Bright Police, First Aid Headquarters and Firehouse To Be Demolished

first_imgSea Bright Borough officials are looking to demolish the storm-damaged century-old police headquarters and firehouse and replace them with new buildings. Photo courtesy Christopher ClarityTHE BOROUGH COUNCIL, at its regular meeting on April 7, passed a resolution that authorized advertising to obtain bids to for the demolition of the firehouse and the police headquarters.Because of damage the buildings received during Super Storm Sandy in October, 2012, the fire and police departments have been operating out of temporary quarters.The police headquarters are in trailers located near the old office and the fire department is on South Street.In a March, 2014 interview, Police Chief John Sorrentino said of the police department and first aid headquarters that “We found mold in the floor and in the walls.”“Every wall in this building had water in it from Sandy. The roof leaked from Sandy. The water came in the doors from Sandy,” he said.Sorrentino said that the main part of the building that housed the police and first aid building is about 100 years old with additions around 80 years old.The firehouse was condemned after building officials said it was unsafe to be occupied.Borough Administrator Joseph Verunni said Wednesday that plans call for two new buildings, the expected cost of which would be about $11 million. The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) would pay up to 90 percent of the cost, he said.Sea Bright Fire Dept. building. Photo courtesy Christopher ClarityOne building would be placed on the foot- print of the existing firehouse, Verunni said, and would contain the fire department and police headquarters. The other would serve as a community center and contain facilities for the beach, including rest rooms and lifeguard quarters, and public meeting rooms and the town’s library, he said.The total new space would be 5,000 square feet for the beach building and 9,500 square feet for the other building, according to Verunni.He said this would be less than the footage of the four buildings; the firehouse, police headquar ters, the librar y and the beach pavil- ion that were being replaced.The new buildings, Verunni said, would have to conform to FEMA requirements. They have “to go up in the air on pilings,” he said, and the utilities will be run from the top down.He said the future of the existing Borough Hall is still under discussion.The large room in the Borough Hall that was previously used for community meetings is no longer available since Sandy, Verunni said, because the borough staff for the many services that are now needed because of the storm is now using it. The room has to be locked at night, he said for both privacy and security reasons since public records are being stored there.Verunni said that there would be about an 18 month to two-year period before the new buildings would be in service.last_img read more

Red Bank Charter School Proposes Expansion

first_imgImpact on public schools is a concernBy John BurtonRED BANK –  A plan to double the size of Red Bank Charter School is necessary in order to meet the needs of the entire community, said Meredith Pennotti, the charter school’s principal.But some traditional public schools supporters fear the increased size would compromise the budgets, resources and extracurricular activities for Red Bank’s diverse school population.And there are the taxpayers, who wonder what it would mean for their property tax bills – should the plan move forward.“The reality is this is not good for the children of Red Bank. It’s not good for the taxpayers of Red Bank. It’s not good for Red Bank,” stressed Jared Rumage, Red Bank superintendent of schools.“We feel we have a model that can be shared more in Red Bank,” for the educational community’s betterment, Pennotti said of the plans.In December, The Red Bank Charter School, 58 Oakland St., submitted a proposal to state Department of Education (DOE) Commissioner David Hespe in Trenton to increase enrollment and facility.Hespe is expected to make his determination toward the end of February, according to DOE spokesman David Saenz.The plan calls for doubling the school’s current student population to 400 from its current 200. That would be done over a three-year period period. In essence, it means adding an additional class of students per grade for the pre-K-8th grade school, according to Pennotti.For the past three years, Pennotti said the wait list for students has been “robust,” roughly 112 students, believing that filling the additional 200 seats is an easy call.The “clincher” for school officials in favor of seeking the expansion, according to Pennotti, was the availability of an adjacent property, 135 Monmouth Street, which the school would use for its S.T.E.M. (science, technology, engineering and math) lab and additional classroom and activity space.Another deciding factor for the school is recent changes in state education policy that allow other factors to be considered when evaluating students’ and families’ socio-economic status as part of admission.Charter school students are selected by an annual lottery, but siblings are accepted without submitting to the lottery. Last year, however, DOE officials changed the lottery to give more weight to family income and other factors, to give those students a better chance to be selected.“This will increase our ability to serve the economically disadvantaged,” Pennotti said.The charter school is increasing its community outreach by mailing a bilingual application to every residence in the community that also makes families aware of the changes in the lottery system, according to Pennotti.Concern about how a proposed expansion of the Red Bank Charter School could impact public schools drew people to the borough’s middle school auditorium Wednesday. They marched to the Borough Council meeting at Borough Hall. Photo: Tina ColellaThe fact that the charter school population is significantly less diverse than the public school population and the community at large has long been a source of contention. Early in the charter school’s history, which was established in 1998, the district Board of Education waged a lengthy and rather bitter legal battle arguing the school allowed for creating a segregated school district, providing for “white flight” from the public school – on the taxpayer’s dime. The lawsuit was eventually unsuccessful and the two entities had entered into a sort of separate peace, letting live and let live, until this development.Increasing the enrollment, fears Rumage, “It is fairly accurate to say that funding would double over that period.” And given the state finances, no one expects funding from Trenton to increase in an appreciable way, he added.The public school district is currently required to provide $1.67 million for the 2015-2016 school year to cover 90 percent of the cost to provide under state guidelines what is determined to be a “thorough and efficient education.” It is up to the charter schools to find the additional 10 percent of the cost and provide and upkeep a facility.Should the state education commissioner allow this plan, departing students will result in less state education aid to the district. And that Rumage maintained, would mean having to raise property taxes, likely to the maximum 5 percent cap, to cover some of the shortfall. And given those limitations, he said, the likely scenario would mean cuts to programs, possibly eliminating positions and abandoning some programs.“It will lead to cuts here that will be devastating,” Rumage said. “I can’t emphasize that enough.”Pennotti countered, saying state aid dollars follow the student, so that money wouldn’t have gone to the district anyway and any decision the charter school makes has no impact on the public school budget.“What happens to the tax rate is the decision the borough makes in its spending,” Pennotti argued, referring to the borough board of education. “We have no input in the school budget.”The charter school was established by activist parents in the late 1990s when Gov. Christine Todd Whitman signed the legislation allowing for such schools to operate. In Red Bank the school was in response to a failing public school district, with rundown facilities and dismal test scores.Charter schools are public schools but have greater freedom and are exempt from much of the bureaucracy that critics say bogs down traditional public education. This freedom, charter school supporters argue, allows for more creative and effective education and gives families a choice.Families braved bitter cold Wednesday night to express concern about proposed plans for a charter school expansion. Photo: Tina ColellaRumage insisted, “I’m not anti-charter school. I’m just anti-expansion,” at this point. He hoped the charter school would postpone the expansion to give the district time to evaluate its situation.Pennotti dismisses the idea of waiting. “Waiting for what?” she asked. “We waited for a promise of a new day from five superintendents,” to turn around the public schools in the 18 years the charter school has been operating. Pennotti maintained her school’s standardized test scores far exceed the public schools’ and “for the sake of the children we have to move forward.”Rumage, who has been in the district for less than two years, fired back that Pennotti and others have mischaracterized the public school students’ achievements. “The big issue here is that people don’t know the full story,” and the strides the public district has been making over the years.The public school disproportionately faces more challenges than the charter school population. Ninety percent of the 1,410 students at the middle and primary schools qualify for (mostly) free and reduced cost lunch, a traditional measure of family income levels. The population also includes 33 percent of students who are limited English language proficient.By contrast, 52 percent of charter school are white (as compared to the 8 percent in the public schools), with a 4 percent population that is limited English-language proficient. The charter school population is 34 percent Hispanic; the public school population is 78 percent Hispanic. The number of charter school students who qualify for the free and reduced cost lunch is currently 38 percent.And some sources indicate that the per pupil funding results in the charter school receiving $2,000 more per student, per year.Julia Sass Rubin, an associate professor at Rutgers University’s Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, and an adjunct professor at Princeton University, has been studying Red Bank and its Charter School as part of her research on state funding of charter schools. Her analysis indicates the charter school has yet to live up to its potential even with its additional resources and continues to contribute to a segregated school district. “The data is pretty straightforward,” she said. “The district is underfunded relative to the charter school, under the current formula.”And when factoring in other variables, the larger percent of special needs students, among others, the divide is closer to $5,000 more per charter school student. And taking all of that into consideration, Rubin said, “if you look at all of those considerations, the charter school is really underperforming,” she said.In her final analysis, this expansion, “would either be devastating for the district or devastating for the taxpayers.”It should be noted Rubin has her detractors. In response to a report on charter school funding, enrollment and demographics she did with a doctoral candidate Mark Weber last year, the New Jersey Charter School Association, a charter school advocacy group, took Rubin to task. The association accused Rubin of having a personal agenda against charter schools.Rubin, this week denied that, offering, “Am I pro-public schools? Absolutely. But I’m not anti-charter school,” noting her daughter had attended a charter school for couple of years and Rubin had served on a nonprofit board that provided charter school facility funding.Rubin planned on providing her research to local educational and elected officials on Friday.This debate has spilled over into the political arena, as well. Mayor Pasquale Menna at this year’s annual reorganization meeting called it “The elephant in the room.”While the borough council has no formal say in the matter or decision, Menna plans to form a “blue ribbon committee,” of objective educational and financial professionals to evaluate the plan’s impact. Their report will be submitted to the DOE for consideration.In addition, on Wednesday evening the borough council was expected to vote on a nonbinding resolution asking the charter school to delay any actions until more information can be collected.Council sources said there was unanimous and bipartisan support for the resolution.last_img read more