How can Sharks survive this time to reach Game 7?

first_imgSAN JOSE – Thursday night, home ice, a Stanley Cup Final berth at stake.That is the Sharks’ desperate, adjusted goal now.And that over-optimistically assumes San Jose will rebound from Sunday’s 5-0 embarrassment, win Tuesday in St. Louis and summon more Game 7 magic. The Sharks have made it this far this year by staving off elimination four times. Do we hear a fifth? A sixth?“You’re never comfortable … Click here if you’re unable to view the photo gallery on your mobile device.last_img read more

Created Designs for Good Health

first_imgScience keeps finding that good health is built into the Master Plan.The Outdoors Is Our EnvironmentSpending at least 120 minutes a week in nature is associated with good health and wellbeing (Nature Scientific Reports). Civilization has been a long process of insulating us from the outdoors. Much of it is for good reason, understandably (during blizzards and heat waves, for instance), but on good days, why bury your face in a computer screen or smartphone? Researchers monitored the well-being of almost 20,000 participants in the UK and found a peak value of about 2-3 hours per week of outdoor exposure was a significant contributing factor:Creation Safaris and other outdoor ministries help people escape to reality.Weekly contact was categorised using 60 min blocks. Analyses controlled for residential greenspace and other neighbourhood and individual factors. Compared to no nature contact last week, the likelihood of reporting good health or high well-being became significantly greater with contact ≥120 mins…. Positive associations peaked between 200–300 mins per week with no further gain. The pattern was consistent across key groups including older adults and those with long-term health issues. It did not matter how 120 mins of contact a week was achieved (e.g. one long vs. several shorter visits/week). Prospective longitudinal and intervention studies are a critical next step in developing possible weekly nature exposure guidelines comparable to those for physical activity.Our bodies are well designed for interaction with the environment. It’s a shame to deprive them of what they were made for. At The Conversation, lead author Matthew White stresses that the benefits are free to all. “Access to most parks and green spaces is free, so even the poorest, and often the least healthy, members of communities have equal access for their health and well-being, he says. “We hope that evidence such as ours will help keep them that way.”Sleep Is Vital to Our Mental HealthSleep increases chromosome dynamics to enable reduction of accumulating DNA damage in single neurons (Zada et al, Nature Communications). This technical paper answers a simple question: Why do we need to sleep? Everyone has probably wondered about that. It’s not just because of the dark at night, because many work late shifts. No, the answer is much more interesting and important: brain activity in waking hours puts a lot of strain on our neurons, and the sleep shift gives the repair crews time to work. Mourrain and Wang explain in a commentary on this paper in Current Biology:While most of our body cells are renewed during the course of our lives, we die with much of the neuronal cells we are born with. Thus, in contrast to a skin, blood or liver cells, which live from days to months, a neuron may need to preserve its integrity while maintaining its capacity to connect to other neurons in an ever-changing environment across decades. While it is unclear how neuronal tissues achieve such a feat, a recurring period of our lives may be critical for the survival and maintenance of our brain cells, including their genome — sleep. A recent study from Zada et al. shows at the single cell level that sleep increases chromosome dynamics in neuronal nuclei to repair DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) accumulated in the genome during wake.Double-stranded breaks are among the most dangerous of DNA injuries. They can lead to cell death or cancer. Complex molecular machines have to grab both loose ends and stitch them back together. The scientists found that genes for DSB repair proteins are up-regulated during sleep. As you lie down in sleep, think about those teams going to work to save your brain!Lack of sleep takes a severe toll on the body and mind. Another study reported by Medical Xpress showed that sleep-deprived firefighters risk exhaustion and mental health problems. About half of firefighters are affected, the study says; most fire stations require 24-hour shifts, sometimes for days in a row, and alarms can go off at any time. Researchers in Australia “suggest that reducing sleep and mental health disturbances should be a focus of fire departments’ occupational health screening programs, along with trialling interventions designed to maximise sleep.”Without enough sleep, the brain can also accumulate damaging molecules. Science Daily reported on another paper in the Journal of Neuroscience that found an association between lack of sleep and accumulation of beta-amyloid and tau proteins, the molecules that are diagnostic of Alzheimer’s Disease. For your protection in your old age, be sure you get enough sleep. Sleeping on your side is best, says Medical Xpress. That posture not only helps your repair machinery eliminate “brain waste” most efficiently, it also helps prevent neck and back strain.Your life will be richer if you live in harmony with the way your body and brain were designed. The Creator thought of everything. Even though the world is fallen from its original perfection, we have ample testimony of God’s design for our joy, peace and health, if we will learn from God’s word and obey it. Learn to love what is good for you, and be grateful. Gratitude increases as we learn about God’s designs, such as DNA repair during sleep and the benefits of natural environments for our eyes and minds. Our greatest need, however, is not bodily health. We need to be “born again” to have spiritual health and a proper relationship with our Maker. Even the most disabled person can have that greatest need fulfilled in his or her spirit. See our Site Map for trail markers on how to get on the straight and narrow path to the joy of the Lord.(Visited 245 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

Piketon farmer’s ingenuity scores him a U.S. Patent

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest One hot summer of dealing with the task of connecting his old 330 John Deere hay baler’s driveshaft to the PTO of his John Deere 6230 was quite enough for 80-year-old Roy Noel.As Noel was working on his rolling-hill farm in Pike County, he came up with a solution for this painstaking chore.“The first year I had that tractor, I could hardly turn the power take off shaft and the driveshaft on that baler is really heavy. It was all I could do to hold it up when I was connecting it,” Noel said. “By the time I tried to hold that driveshaft up, in line, and turn the tractor’s shaft to put it together, 20 minutes would go by.”The second year in the hay fields with those same green and yellow implements, Noel knew that there had to be a better, more productive way to get the job done.“I had a prototype of this tool I designed made at a shop in Waverly,” Noel said, as he showed off his “Y”-shaped, wrench type instrument with a thumb screw on one tip. “I used it all of that summer on my baler, bush hog and mower conditioner and it worked just fine.”Noel knew he had something that could make a difference on many other farms, like it did for his, so he called up a lawyer in Cincinnati. After 3 years, Noel’s ingenuity and hard work was recognized in the form of a U.S. patent. Patent number 9,009,943, to be exact, means Noel is the only one that can manufacture this particular design.“Research was done about this idea of mine all the way back to the 1800’s, and I found out that PTOs on tractors didn’t start until the 1920’s,” Noel said. “So I figured I had something unique, which surprised me because the concept is so simple.”Noel’s inventions give a farmer just enough leverage to turn the tractor’s PTO shaft to get any piece of equipment hooked up safely and much more efficiently, in about 10 seconds.The prototype still sits on Noel’s kitchen table, alongside one of 31 tools that have been manufactured for sale. Right now he is all sold out.This isn’t the first time that Noel, a retired machinist, has come up with an idea on his farm that has made the job more productive. Years ago, he designed a guard on a small bush hog to keep the weeds from wrapping around the shaft, but the idea of patenting that concept never came to mind and he says he wouldn’t mess with another patent now.As for the patent he did get, he doesn’t plan to keep it too much longer.“I’m not sure what it’s worth, but the plan is to sell this patent,” Noel said. “I’m dealing with a company in Arizona that specializes in selling patents like this and they will deal on the price with a company that wants to buy it. They’ll get a small percentage for selling it and I’ll get the rest.”When that day comes, Noel says he doesn’t have any big plans because he is too attached to the farm.While Noel waits for that little piece of paper to come in the mail, he is getting plenty of big items sent to him, including commendations from the Ohio Senate and the Ohio House of Representatives.“Between the patent letter and those two recognitions from Columbus, we have plenty of new frames to hang,” Noel said, as he looked along the walls lined with his prized deer heads. “But I guess we’ll have to move some of these first.”Trophies from a good day in the woods will soon be replaced by trophies from a lifetime of a job well done in the field.last_img read more