Girls Athlete of the Week: Makenna Hicks of La Salle High School

first_img Make a comment 4 recommended0 commentsShareShareTweetSharePin it Name: Makenna HicksSchool: La Salle High SchoolSport: GolfGrade: SophomoreAccomplishment: The Lancers captain finished off her sophomore season by earning first-team all-league honors at the Camino Real League finals at Griffith Park on Thursday. Hicks regularly shot team-low scores all year, and she also boasts a 4.0 grade-point average. Get our daily Pasadena newspaper in your email box. Free.Get all the latest Pasadena news, more than 10 fresh stories daily, 7 days a week at 7 a.m. Top of the News EVENTS & ENTERTAINMENT | FOOD & DRINK | THE ARTS | REAL ESTATE | HOME & GARDEN | WELLNESS | SOCIAL SCENE | GETAWAYS | PARENTS & KIDS Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked * More Cool Stuff Subscribe Name (required)  Mail (required) (not be published)  Website  top box 10 Girls Athlete of the Week: Makenna Hicks of La Salle High School From STAFF REPORTS Published on Monday, October 24, 2016 | 3:04 pmcenter_img Pasadena Will Allow Vaccinated People to Go Without Masks in Most Settings Starting on Tuesday Community News Business News Community News First Heatwave Expected Next Week Pasadena’s ‘626 Day’ Aims to Celebrate City, Boost Local Economy faithfernandez More » ShareTweetShare on Google+Pin on PinterestSend with WhatsApp,Virtual Schools PasadenaHomes Solve Community/Gov/Pub SafetyPASADENA EVENTS & ACTIVITIES CALENDARClick here for Movie Showtimes HerbeautyInstall These Measures To Keep Your Household Safe From Covid19HerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty8 Easy Exotic Meals Anyone Can MakeHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyStop Eating Read Meat (Before It’s Too Late)HerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty6 Trends To Look Like A Bombshell And 6 To Forget AboutHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyNutritional Strategies To Ease AnxietyHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty9 Of The Best Family Friendly Dog BreedsHerbeautyHerbeauty Home of the Week: Unique Pasadena Home Located on Madeline Drive, Pasadenalast_img read more

Did rapid brain evolution make humans susceptible to Alzheimers?

first_imgOf the millions of animals on Earth, including the relativehandful that are considered the most intelligent — including apes, whales,crows, and owls — only humans experience the severe age-related decline inmental abilities marked by Alzheimer’sdisease.To BruceYankner, professor of pathology and neurology at Harvard Medical School (HMS),it’s pretty clear that evolution is to blame.“Something has occurred in evolution that makes our brainsusceptible to age-related change,” Yankner said in a talk last nightsponsored by the HarvardMuseum of Natural History as part of its “EvolutionMatters” lecture series.Yankner, whose HMS lab studies brain aging and how gettingold gives rise to the pathology of Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases, said Alzheimer’s isone of the most rapidly emerging diseases of this century. As medical sciencelengthens human lifespan, the proportion of the population that is elderly isgrowing. Considering that as many as half of those over age 85 developAlzheimer’s, there is a growing urgency to understand the disease more fullyand to develop more effective interventions.“It is clear that cognitive impairment and decline is one ofthe emerging health threats of the 21st century,” Yankner said.Yankner said that scientific evidence shows that somecognitive decline — beginning in middle age and accelerating after age 70 — isnormal as we grow older. This decline is also seen in other animals, includingmice and monkeys. It is marked by wide variation among individuals, with someindividuals maintaining cognitive abilities similar to those much younger.The puzzling question, Yankner said, is why humans developthe severe disabilities of Alzheimer’s disease. Studies of other creatures showno sign of similar conditions even in our closest animal relatives. That meanssusceptibility to Alzheimer’s evolved recently, likely during a period markedby a rapid increase in our brain size. Size alone probably isn’t thedetermining factor, though, Yankner said, since other animals are known to haveeven larger brains, including whales, elephants, and even our extinct relativethe Neanderthal.Instead, he said, it is likely that brain complexity and thenew large number of cells in the human brain have something to do with it.Recent research, in Yankner’s lab and elsewhere, has usedgenetic tools to probe the differences between young and old brains in humans,monkeys, and mice. The work shows that gene function in the aging brain slows —dramatically in ones with Alzheimer’s — and that the genes that shut off themost are those that protect the brain against genetic damage from environmentaland other factors.Yankner said he believes that cognitive decline is due to aslow accumulation of genetic damage in the aging brain, with Alzheimer’sshowing the most severe form of this damage, called double strand breaks.Though the source of the damage is not yet clear, one culprit, he said, may bethe accumulation of metals in the brain over time, particularly iron.Neurons use more energy than most other cells, Yankner said.With the brain’s increase in complexity over time, its energy demands alsorose. Iron plays a key role in a cell’s energy-producing mitochondria, and soiron accumulation leading to genetic damage could be a byproduct of ourneuron-rich, energy-gobbling brains.“Aging is a balance between wear and tear and repair. Whereyou wind up in that balance determines how you do,” Yankner said.last_img read more

Northwest Farm Credit Service Grant For International Mermaid Museum

first_imgFacebook32Tweet0Pin0Submitted by Westport WineryThe non-profit International Mermaid Museum was awarded a $1000 grant this week from Northwest Farm Credit Services headquartered in Spokane, Washington. Museum founder Kim Roberts said, “This grant is special since it will allow us to feature a display on oyster farming here on the Washington Coast. We will tie it back to the story of Ben-Varrey mermaids from Scotland.”The museum has a clear mission of teaching ocean ecology from seashore to sea floor immersed in mermaid mythology. Roberts said, “Our board of directors believes offering these lessons within the mythology of merfolk will allow the museum to engage all ages in a fun and unique manner. When you look around the world, virtually all seafaring nations have mermaid lore. This is one of those things that unites different cultures.”The museum’s grant application was sponsored by Stan and Jill Schwartz Farms in Reardan, Washington. A portion of the proceeds from spirits crafted by Ocean’s Daughter Distillery are donated to support the museum. The distillery will release a new whiskey made from Washington white winter wheat grown on the Schwartz farm later this year. Ben-Varrey is the name of their Irish cream liqueur.This is the first museum in the world dedicated to mermaids. It will be constructed on the grounds of Westport Winery Garden Resort on the Washington Coast. This is also home to Ocean’s Daughter Distillery.This is the second grant awarded to the museum. The first came from the Awesome Foundation in the amount of $750.Inquiries about making financial donations or items to include in the display are encouraged by emailing [email protected]last_img read more