Tributes spring up across campus

first_imgSince the death of Fr. Theodore Hesburgh on Thursday night, the Notre Dame community has honored him with various tributes around campus, spontaneous and planned. We have collected some of those moments here.March 110 a.m. — University President Emeritus Fr. Edward “Monk” Malloy celebrates Mass at the Basilica of the Sacred Heart and reflects on Fr. Hesburgh’s legacy in the homily. The Liturgical choir led a rendition of the Alma Mater in Hesburgh’s honor at the end of the Mass.9:33 a.m. — The Notre Dame women’s lacrosse team unveiled the patches it will wear to honor Fr. Hesburgh in its Sunday afternoon game against Duke.Feb. 281 p.m. — The No. 2 Notre Dame men’s lacrosse team observed a moment of silence in honor of Fr. Hesburgh before its game against Dartmouth in Loftus Sports Center. The team also wore “Fr. Ted” stickers on its helmets.“If you look at the history of Notre Dame, Knute Rockne made Notre Dame famous, and Fr. Ted took that and made Notre Dame a great university,” Irish coach Kevin Corrigan said.All day — The American flag in the middle of South Quad flies at half staff.Feb. 279:45 p.m. — Notre Dame Symphony Orchestra played the Notre Dame Alma Mater in honor of Fr. Ted following its concert Friday night.“Notre Dame lost her greatest son,” orchestra director Daniel Stowe said.7:00 p.m. — Fr. Ted was honored by the hockey team before its game against No. 9 Boston College at Compton Family Ice Arena with a moment of silence and a video tribute, in addition to “Fr. Ted” stickers on the Irish helmets.“I had no idea when I first started here what kind of man we had with us here on campus,” Irish coach Jeff Jackson said.7:00 p.m. — The 85th annual Bengal Bouts Tournament remembered Fr. Hesburgh with a moment of silence and a 10-bell salute while his picture was put up on the video boards.5:27 p.m. — Senior Associate Athletics Director John Heisler sent out an email to the Notre Dame football media list reading, “Beginning today, Notre Dame athletic teams will wear ‘Fr. Ted’ patches or stickers on some combination of their uniforms, warm-ups or helmets. Moments of silence will be observed prior to home events in each of Notre Dame’s 26 varsity sports. In the near future, there will be commemorative signage created for each Notre Dame home athletic venue — to be featured either on the field or court itself or displayed elsewhere at the facility.”3:28 p.m. — The Notre Dame softball team announced through its Twitter account that players would wear black ribbons in their hair during two games against No. 20 Missouri and Georgetown “in honor of the late Father Theodore.”3:00 p.m. — A bouquet of flowers sits in the snow at the feet of the Fr. Hesburgh statue in front of the “Word of Life” mural on the south face of Hesburgh Library.11:00 a.m. — Notre Dame President Fr. John Jenkins held a press conference to reflect on Fr. Hesburgh’s influence on the University and to provide details about the schedule for the upcoming days.“Next to Fr. Sorin, no one had a greater impact on this University,” Jenkins said. “Notre Dame lost a piece of its heart last night. But Fr. Ted lives on.”At first light — The Notre Dame Grounds Crew began putting up Hesburgh banners on light poles across campus.Throughout the night — Notre Dame students, faculty and community members gathered at the Grotto to remember Fr. Ted. Candles spelling out “TED” were arranged on one of the racks, and some people sang the Alma Mater.1:07 a.m. — The Observer tweeted out the news Fr. Theodore Hesburgh died at the age of 97, confirmed by a University spokesperson. Tags: campus tributes, Remembering Father Hesburghlast_img read more

Cricket News Cummins, Starc, Hazzlewood may be rested for first 3 ODIs against India

first_img For all the Latest Sports News News, Cricket News News, Download News Nation Android and iOS Mobile Apps. Melbourne: Australia is set to rest its fast-bowling trio of Pat Cummins, Mitchell Starc and Josh Hazzlewood for the first three ODIs against India in a bid to manage their workload ahead of a busy international calender.  Cummins has been Australia’s top performer with both the ball and the bat in the just-concluded Boxing Day Test in Melbourne and coach Justin Langer insisted that it’s a great selection “conundrum” for the hosts for the ODI series which begins in Sydney on January 12. Langer said Australia need to keep its players fit and fresh ahead of busy 2019, which includes a World Cup and an Ashes tour and hinted that Cummins, Starc and Hazlewood may be rested in the ODI series against India ahead of the two Tests against Sri Lanka.“It’s the great conundrum for us, really, how we manage our bowlers. For example, we might not play them in the next three one-dayers so they’re ready for the next two (Tests) to keep them fresh,” Langer was quoted as saying by ‘The Sydney Morning Herald’.Also Read | Cameron Bancroft returns to competitive cricket, plays for Perth Scorchers in Big Bash League“He (Cummins) has been brilliant, he’s been outstanding but then – as soon as we do that they want to play and also then everyone else would be on our back saying: ‘Why aren’t they playing every single game?’ But if you play every game – we’ve also got a World Cup and Ashes next year – we want him fresh for those things.”Cummins, who has been Australia’s best fast bowler in the first three Tests against India with 14 wickets at an average of 20.07, had earlier missed the ODI series in England and the two Tests against Pakistan in the UAE owing to injuries.The lanky pacer is one of several Australian cricketers, who will not feature in the 2019 IPL because of a packed international calendar.“You look at every year on an individual basis and the player as well. There might be times when it’s a really good thing for them to be playing IPL. But there’s so much cricket now. The players individually – and us as management – have to make sure we get the balance right so everyone is happy and playing cricket,” Langer said.Read More | Bangladesh lifts Steve Smith’s Twenty20 tournament ban“So getting that management right and staying true to the management, so we can have him (Cummins) fit and firing – we’ve got to be strong with that because there’s got to be a lot of people with different opinions as to whether they should play every game.“But we know it’s really hard to play all year around because they need to keep their bodies as fresh and strong (as possible) and then be bowling at the level we want them to be at. It’s a real balancing act as well,” he added. last_img read more

NBA Draft: Michael Gbinije tries to answer the questions he faces coming out of Syracuse

first_imgMichael Gbinije had prepared for the moment. He’d heard the whispers from other guys who had already been through Boston. He’d run more than normal on the treadmill. He knew the Boston Celtics worked their prospects hard before making them compete in one final conditioning drill.In the afternoon on May 21, the former Syracuse point guard felt good when he found himself at the end line of the Celtics practice facility in Waltham, Massachusetts, ready to run as many sprints as he could in three minutes.“It’s competitive,” Gbinije said. “You’ve got the front office people watching, the coaches watching. Regardless of how you played in (the scrimmages) before, you have one last chance. … I wanted nothing left in the tank leaving the workout.”Twenty-seven times he made it up and down the court. There were a handful of prospects there and Gbinije said he was bested only by former Louisville guard Damion Lee, who managed 29.Gbinije eventually completed the same drill for the Phoenix Suns and Los Angeles Clippers. By the time the NBA Draft starts on Thursday at 8 p.m., Gbinije will have worked out for 15 teams. Those teams combine to hold every pick from No. 27 to No. 47, among others. That range corresponds with most mock drafts, which project him in the late-first or mid-second round.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textKiran Ramsey | Web DesignerBy then, he’ll have finished all his preparation: Studying an NBA superstar, working out with a famous trainer and answering all the questions front offices have for a fifth-year senior who took longer than most to figure out his best position on the floor. And the school at which he could play it. And at a program with an unusual brand of defense.“The first question every team asks is, ‘Can he guard man-to-man?’” said Frank Gbinije, Michael’s father. “And obviously he’s showed that he can, in AAU, at Duke and on the Nigeria national team. … Quite frankly, he would prefer man-to-man (to zone) because he wants to chase the ball.”That’s a question that’s stalked many Syracuse players after leaving the Orange’s signature 2-3 zone. But what that man-to-man question really means, multiple people said, is: Does he have enough speed for NBA point guards? The size for small forwards?There are more questions surrounding Gbinije because of his lack of stability. He started at Duke, then transferred to Syracuse and sat out a season. He didn’t get much playing time his first year in orange then found some consistency as a forward — only to shift from the wing and reinvent himself as a point guard for his last season.All that change leaves most scouting reports with the basic information spun different ways: He recently turned 24. It’s too late to develop him. Or, he’s primed to be a low-maintenance contributor on a win-now team.He is 6-foot-7 and 205 pounds. That’s too small for forward or too slow for guard. Or, his frame and skillset fit perfectly into an NBA trending toward smaller lineups when he could handle the ball at forward. He is ‘fundamentally sound,’ in many reports. He has a low ceiling because he is decent everywhere but excels nowhere. Or, that shows intelligence, versatility and potential upside when given a role.Gbinije’s assets are known. What he’ll do with them is not.MORE COVERAGE:NBA Draft: The case for picking Michael GbinijeNBA Draft: The case against picking Michael GbinijeNBA Draft: The case for picking Malachi RichardsonNBA Draft: The case against picking Malachi RichardsonOn the beat: NBA Draft preview and a look ahead to the 2016-17 Syracuse basketball season Related Stories On the beat: NBA Draft preview and a look ahead to the 2016-17 Syracuse basketball seasonNBA Draft: The case against picking Michael GbinijeNBA Draft: The case for picking Michael GbinijeNBA Draft: The case against picking Malachi RichardsonNBA Draft: The case for picking Malachi Richardson Published on June 21, 2016 at 11:53 am Contact Sam: [email protected] | @Sam4TR The search for answers started immediately. After a two-week break following the Final Four to finish school, he flew from Syracuse to Los Angeles. There, he worked out with NBA trainer Rob McClanaghan, a former SU basketball walk-on who has worked with stars Stephen Curry, Jimmy Butler and Carmelo Anthony.They worked on shooting, another question from NBA teams. Gbinije shot 46.1 percent from the field and 39.2 percent from 3-point range in the last two seasons, but teams want to know if he’s a good enough pure shooter for that to translate.McClanaghan emphasized to Gbinije over six weeks the ability to adapt to the NBA game. When he wasn’t jetting around the country to team workouts, Gbinije spent about five days per week in high-intensity, 75-minute workouts: Shooting more from the new 3-point line off the catch and dribble, changing pace while handling the ball and maneuvering in the post.“I knew he was a good athlete, but he’s a sneaky athlete,” McClanaghan said. “He’ll creep up and dunk on you. I didn’t know he had that in him, but he definitely does. He’s very consistent. (NBA teams) will know what they’re getting.”“An attractive second-round gamble,” wrote Jonathan Wasserman on Bleacher Report.“He’ll be in the league a long time,” McClanaghan said.“There’s certainly a future for him overseas,” wrote Tajh Jenkins on NBADraft.net.“I’m a competitive, learning basketball player,” Gbinije said.He said he pitches himself to teams as someone who can make adjustments quickly, like that point guard switch. NBA teams have tried him out on and off the ball. Once he has a team, then Gbinije said he’ll adapt to the position they want him in.Daily Orange File PhotoHe likes learning, even from afar by watching, like he did with Oklahoma City superstar Kevin Durant.On May 6, the Thunder lost a late lead at home to the San Antonio Spurs in Game 3 of the Western Conference Semifinals. Despite playing nearly 42 minutes and the game ending around 11 p.m. local time, Durant arrived at Mahogany Steakhouse downtown not long after with his teammate Nazr Mohammed.Durant and Gbinije share the same agent at Roc Nation and said hello, but not much more. The Thunder superstar and Mohammed talked about the loss most of the night.“I was observing, seeing how he interacts with people, watching how he plays the game,” Gbinije said. “(Durant) doesn’t get tired. I came in on a flight, went to the game and then we were at (the steakhouse) until 2 a.m. Me and my agent were tired and this guy just played a full-out game, and he just had energy. That stood out to me.”He soaked up information from others, working out with and against projected lottery picks like Marquette’s Henry Ellenson and NBA players Jerami Grant and Ray McCallum. Gbinije played “very solid” against that level of competition, according to McClanaghan.After weeks of interviews and workouts, and years of playing in high-profile college games, Gbinije is ready to stop telling teams what he can do and start showing them.“Whatever (teams) don’t know about me,” Gbinije said. “They’re going to find out.” Comments Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more