Made In America Festival Announces 2016 Lineup

first_imgJay-Z‘s Made In America Festival is making its way back to Philadelphia for a Labor Day Weekend celebration from September 3rd-4th. The event will take place at Philly’s Benjamin Franklin Parkway and will feature performances from Rihanna, Coldplay, Collegrove (ft. 2 Chainz & Lil’ Wayne), Chance the Rapper, Gary Clark Jr., Martin Garrix, Edward Sharpe and the Magnetic Zeros, Jamie XX, Adventure Club and more.TIDAL members get early access to tickets on Wednesday, June 22 at 10AM EST and tickets are on sale to the general public on Monday, June 27 at 10AM EST. Check out the festival website here.last_img read more

The Croatian Giants application uses augmented reality to revive a part of Croatian history

first_imgBy scanning Croatian banknotes through the Croatian Greats application, three-dimensional animations are launched that speak, move around the space and reveal some interesting moments from Croatian history.This is the easiest way to explain the new application. “Croatian greats ” Delta Reality studio, which uses augmented reality to revive a part of Croatian history and bring new technology closer to all smartphone users. The Delta Reality team created the app to bring people closer to augmented reality, which to many still seems like an abstract concept, but can actually be enjoyed by anyone with a smartphone.This technology is already used in places such as museums, where scanning an image through dedicated applications animates the image or provides some additional information about it, but the Delta Reality team has decided to provide this opportunity to everyone, wherever they are, without the need to visit a specific site or museum.Thus, banknotes were imposed as a solution – a piece of history that everyone has with them, explains Darian Škarica, director of Delta Reality, and adds that they wanted everyone to be able to experience augmented reality. “We thought about what we could use as triggers, what image anyone could have. We quickly realized how banknotes could serve perfectly, because they have so many details that we often overlook. We immersed ourselves in creating content related to the motifs on the banknotes and designing so that we could bring them to life.”Points out Škarica.But that’s just the beginning, explains Škarica, because augmented reality will really take off when we no longer need a phone screen for it, but we will see it through augmented reality glasses. “One of the great things that the future of augmented reality brings us is the revival of everything around us – monuments will talk to us, strange creatures will fly over the city, there will be portals to the past throughout the city. We’ve already done some short experiments in this area, but it’s one thing to look at things like this through a cell phone screen, and it’s another thing to fully experience it using augmented reality glasses. ” concludes Scissors.Technology is there to help and speed up all business processes, changes are happening faster and those who ignore it will unfortunately have to close their doors. Don’t be afraid of new technologies, but use them to improve your business.You can download the Android app through the Google Play Store HERE, and the iPhone app is available on the iOS App Store HERERelated news:CAN VIRTUAL REALITY THREATEN TOURISM?last_img read more

Keeping Power Companies Honest

first_imgJudy Musa and Kin Gee are working to form an advocacy organization which protects electrical ratepayers in legislative discussions. The group, CHARGE, was formed from their volunteer work fighting a transmission line project over the last two years. Photo by Jay CookBy Jay Cook |MIDDLETOWN – There are public policy programs for fresher air and cleaner drinking water, but a new advocacy group believes the focus should also be on larger issues in the electrical utility industry.It’s why a small group of Monmouth County residents have teamed up to give a voice to electrical consumers who suffer when the power shuts off and the lights don’t turn back on. Their new organization, Consumers Helping Affect Regulation of Gas and Electric (CHARGE), plans to jolt public utilities into more proactivity and transparency on the local service level.“There’s really little consumer voice in terms of public policy for the distribution system and the regulation of that,” CHARGE president Kin Gee, a Holmdel resident, told The Two River Times this week. “What we want to do is be the consumer advocate to make sure those issues are brought to light for education and to bring awareness.”Gee, a semi-retired risk management consultant, and board secretary Judy Musa, a public relations professional, are no strangers to the electrical industry. They successfully anchored the residents group Residents Against Giant Electric during a two-year legal battle fighting Jersey Central Power & Light’s (JCP&L) Monmouth County Reliability Project, a proposed 230-kV transmission line from Aberdeen to Red Bank along the NJ Transit North Jersey Coast Line commuter rail right-of-way. The project was shot down by BPU officials in June.That experience provided Gee and Musa with two years’ worth of background about how the electrical industry operates throughout New Jersey.“These problems are symptoms of a bigger issue – the neglect of the whole distribution system,” Gee said. “We need to have that system fixed because it’s broken. Unless someone comes in, this will go on for years.”The group has already been active on the state level as it works to secure nonprofit status. Gee has testified before the New Jersey Legislature on public utility business practices and reliability standards across the board in the past year.The most common problems are caused by the distribution lines looping down streets and along highways, he said. Wooden poles along roadways are usually the culprits when stormy weather causes power outages.“The service is the part that’s falling apart,” Musa. “And at the end of the day, we’re the ones who sit in the dark waiting for them to turn the lights on.”Gee is also bothered by the discrepancy between what ratepayers pay to the utility companies and the level of performance that’s reciprocated. According to the U.S. Energy Information Administration, New Jersey typically has among the top 10 highest electricity prices in the country. But a June 2017 report from the American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy found New Jersey’s two largest utilities to be in the bottom half nationwide in terms of service.“There are rates paid and with those rates are certain expectations,” Musa added. “Those are not being met.”Thanks to a wave of two intense winter storms earlier this year, public utilities were put in the spotlight for their business practices. Winter storms Quinn and Riley knocked out power to over 100,000 New Jersey residents during that brief span in March.Gee testified in April on behalf of ratepayers to the economic growth committee of the state Senate during hearings on implementing stricter fines for public utilities for service failures doing major storms. Fines were bumped up from $100 per day to $25,000 per violation.On a local level, Monmouth County residents receive electrical service from JCP&L, a subsidiary of the Ohio-based FirstEnergy organization.And Monmouth County felt the effect of those winter storms. Monmouth County Freeholder Patrick Impreveduto sent a letter to the state Board of Public Utilities (BPU) in May asking for meetings with JCP&L to discuss “their outdated infrastructure that is negatively impacting the lives of thousands of taxpayers throughout New Jersey.”Last month, JCP&L took a step forward in addressing “reliability and resiliency” to its distribution system when it announced a nearly $400 million plan, JCP&L Reliability Plus, to protect the local distribution systems from severe weather and the frequency of power outages.That project includes over 4,000 enhancements to underground and aboveground lines as well as more vegetation management locally. Still in the petition phase, the utility proposed a 25-cent increase to ratepayers.“The special focus of this program is to limit damage during severe weather events,” JCP&L president Jim Fakult said in a statement. “The new equipment, along with enhanced vegetation management, builds on our ongoing efforts to ensure customer service reliability and resiliency.”Although CHARGE has taken no official position yet, Gee said he is still skeptical. Sure, improvements are positive, but he argued the project’s need. Existing management practices in place should already address those issues.A Sept. 11 public meeting in Holmdel has been set to discuss the JCP&L Reliability Plus project.This article was first published in the August 16-23, 2018 print edition of The Two River Times.last_img read more