Fearless mum braves Donegal’s rough seas to raise over €23,000

first_imgA Donegal-based mum braved the choppy waters of West Donegal to complete a hugely successful charity swim last weekend.Fiona Harrington (27) swam from Owey to Cruit Island on Saturday to raise money for the BUMBLEance children’s ambulance service.While she isn’t an experienced swimmer, Fiona ventured into the water for the 1km swim while her family and friends cheered her on. Speaking to Donegal Daily, Fiona admitted that she was a ‘bit sore’ the day after the swim but overwhelmed to raise more than €23,000 so far. Fiona Harrington’s charity swim from Owey-Cruit Island in aid of BUMBLEanceFiona Harrington’s charity swim from Owey-Cruit Island in aid of BUMBLEanceThe entire feat was inspired by Fiona and her partner Dwain Rodgers’ baby girl, Willow.Willow is seven months old and was born with a life-limiting condition called Smith-Lemli-Opitz.The birth defects caused by the disorder make travelling a huge challenge for the family. But the BUMBLEance service made Fiona and Dwain’s dreams come true in August when they helped them fly with Willow to Bere Island in Cork for a special visit to see Fiona’s parents.“Willow is on oxygen, a feeding tube and morphine. We would never have been able to drive to Cork ourselves. “BUMBLEance flew us from Carrickfinn Airport, which is just behind our house, to Kerry. Then they had a BUMBLEance for us on the runway and brought us to the ferry. It was so nice to bring her to my home. They made our dream come true.”Fiona, who is originally from Cork, was so amazed by the charity service that she wanted to do something to give back.She came up with the idea of an island-island swim, but never expected to raise so much money.So far, the total raised between online and offline donations is estimated at €23,000.Fiona Harrington’s charity swim from Owey-Cruit Island in aid of BUMBLEanceFiona said: “I can’t believe it. At the start, I only expected to get a thousand euro, maybe two.” Looking back on the swim, Fiona said that Saturday’s sea conditions were a challenge during the 40 minute journey.“It was a bit wavy out. I was definitely rougher than I thought it would be,” she said.“It took me a while to get into it at the start. We started on land and I had to swim out through a cove but there was a strong drag there.“I was joined by John Green from the Arranmore Fast Ferry and Judith, a woman from Belfast. “My dad was in a rib with the Arranmore Fast Ferry that came alongside us and he got in to swim beside me at the halfway point. And Dwain was in a rib on our other side taking photos.”Fiona Harrington’s charity swim from Owey-Cruit Island in aid of BUMBLEanceFiona had great support from the Arranmore Fast Ferry and said that she is thankful to every person who donated and helped with the charity swim.There is still time to donate and if you would like to support BUMBLEance, visit Fiona’s fundraising page here:https://www.justgiving.com/fundraising/fiona-harrington3Fearless mum braves Donegal’s rough seas to raise over €23,000 was last modified: November 5th, 2019 by Rachel McLaughlinShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)last_img read more

Giants give no guarantee to Dereck Rodriguez

first_imgSCOTTSDALE, Ariz. — Dereck Rodriguez was like a painkiller for the Giants last year, providing the ailing team with a desperately needed dose of starting pitching after coming up from the minors in late May.While most of the staff struggled through injuries and inconsistency, the rookie right-hander delivered a 6-4 record and 2.81 earned-runs average, best among the team’s starters. Every fifth day, he was usually giving San Francisco temporary relief from an otherwise disappointing season.Eve …last_img read more

Global Policies Can Trust Fake Science

first_imgSome matters are just too complicated to know with certainty. Here’s another “whoops” moment in climate science.Look at this headline in Nature by Fangqun Yu, analyzing a recent paper: “Atmospheric reaction networks affecting climate are more complex than was thought.” Those last two words are telling. Beware scientists who think they “now know” something. Sometimes they do, but sometimes they only “thought” they knew. They study phenomena, measure things, analyze things, and draw conclusions. An unsuspecting public or policy official trusts that scientists know what they say they know. Laws ensue that can affect nations for good or ill. Sometimes they can affect the whole world.This instance involves measurements of particles in the air emitted by plants and/or human industry. One doesn’t need the details about isoprene, VOCs, and such to get the gist. Previous scientists made a simple logical mistake. They assumed that they could measure the volume of “secondary organic aerosols” (SOAs, the particles in the air that condense moisture into clouds) by adding up the contributions of individual sources separately. It turns out, a new study in Nature by McFiggans et al warns, that when measured in combination instead of separately, these sources act in unexpected ways. They “scavenge” each other and reduce the number of aerosols. That’s why Yu writes that the atmospheric effects are “more complex than thought,” changing what climate scientists thought they knew about clouds – and climate. Sheepishly, Yu writes,It will be necessary to include the HOM [highly oxygenated organic molecule] scavenging observed by McFiggans et al. in global models that explicitly consider particle formation and growth, to understand the climatic implications.Finally, the suppression of SOA formation by the mixtures of compounds studied will depend on the relative concentrations of those compounds and, for isoprene, on the acidity of pre-existing particles, both of which are changing in the atmosphere as a result of emissions associated with human activities. Further research is needed to understand the potentially large effects of such emissions on the magnitude of SOA suppression, and therefore on climate change.The lessons here apply to all science, not just climate science. Simplistic ideas often work their ways into grand deductions, which can work their way into global policy. Many processes in nature are too complex for simplistic ideas. Errors in the foundations can be aggravated in the conclusions. Yu admits that the effects of the reported errors in this case can have “potentially large effects.” We don’t understand the climate, he says. Further work is needed, he says. We don’t understand the magnitude of these effects on climate change. And that’s just in the observable present. What about climate change in the unobservable past? What about climate in the future? McFiggans et al end their paper,It is likely that both background oxidant concentrations and VOC emissions (and hence OH• reactivity) will change in the future. Without a reasonable representation of SOA yields in different atmospheric VOC mixtures it will not be possible to predict the SOA contribution to atmospheric particulate matter effectively.Given the uncertainties revealed by this paper, how can any scientist possibly compute the anthropogenic contribution to effects that they “thought” they understood? How can they predict what the temperature of the earth (if there is such a thing, 16 Jan 2015) will be a hundred years from now? Fake science prophets won’t have to be held accountable, because they will all be dead.This entry is not about climate change. It is about epistemology. In many areas of science, educators and governments rely on what “science says.” They cannot speak the language and do the math that scientists can. This gives scientists a shaman-like authority. Scientism has created a political climate that too easily dismisses those who challenge the consensus as “science deniers” who “don’t understand science.” Remember what the late author Michael Crichton said: “consensus is not science, period.” Science rises or falls on the evidence. That evidence must be gathered systematically, without bias, analyzed rigorously, and presented tentatively. When a scientist tells you that your SUV is causing global warming and you need to walk to work, you should ask, “How do you know that?” Don’t fall for the “97% of scientists agree” line. That’s the bandwagon fallacy. Not from any “climate denier” source, but from the pro-climate-change research itself published in leading science journals, we have been collecting quite an assortment of cases like this, where things “affecting climate are more complex than was thought” (see 21 April 2018, 16 May 2017, 19 Sept 2016). The purpose is not to take sides on the climate controversy, but to learn how science works. If climate scientists keep finding this many things they thought they knew in the observable present that aren’t so, what about scientists who speak pompously about things that they claim happened millions of years ago? Biological change, without doubt, is far, far more complex than climate! To claim anything with credibility about evolution, a biologist would need to understand genetics, epigenetics, population genetics, genetic drift, ecology, natural selection, sexual selection, kin selection, niche construction, mutation rates, mutation sources, botany, mycology, biochemistry, molecular biology, pathology, fossils, marine biology, geology, and much, much more. Plus, the Darwinian needs to understand the relative contribution of all these factors in a particular situation. This is clearly beyond the capabilities of the human mind. But it IS within the capabilities of the human imagination! – and that is why, with copious bluffing, and ample Darwin Flubber on hand – Darwinism survives.(Visited 415 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

Investing in the Eastern Cape

first_imgThe Eastern Cape offers major cities, airports, ports as well as a dynamic manufacturing sector which includes the southern African bases of some of the world’s major companies.The Eastern Cape offers modern infrastructure for import and export, such as the deep-water Port of Ngqura near Port Elizabeth. (Image: Brand South Africa)John YoungThe Eastern Cape is on the south-eastern coast of Africa, a location that is proving to be an international asset. The allocation of two of South Africa’s five industrial development zones (IDZs) to the province is confirmation of the potential that is offered by the shipping traffic that operates between Europe and Asia and the Far East.Eastern Cape overviewEastern Cape governmentEastern Cape Development CorporationThe province is well served logistically, with two major airports in Port Elizabeth and East London, and several facilities serving smaller towns such as Mthatha and Bhisho. In addition, many farms and private game reserves have airstrips.The construction of the large new port at Ngqura, within the Coega IDZ, brings to three the number of effective ports operating in the Eastern Cape.The province’s road network is defined by the west-east axis of the coastal N2, with three other national routes (N9, N10 and N6) providing north-south routes through the region.The reopening of the Mthatha-East London line is a step along the path of revitalising the province’s rail network, a vital part of any rural upliftment plan.Varied topographical and climatic conditions contribute to a diverse agricultural offering that includes wool, mohair, dairy and forestry, and make for a superb tourist destination.The Eastern Cape is home to four of South Africa’s biggest automotive companies and several of the largest concerns in the automotive components and support sectors. The catalytic convertor industry is a world leader.Transformative projectsProjects that are due to come on stream at the Coega IDZ have the potential to transform the provincial economy. In the medium-term, Coega is the preferred site of a new oil refinery. Project Mthombo, set to be completed in 2017 according to the plan, would cost about R77-billion and create 18 000 jobs in the operational phase.The plan to locate a new manganese processing plant at Coega will similarly inject massive amounts of capital into the province, and have a sustained downstream effect on related industries and suppliers. Investment at the Port of Ngqura, part of the Coega IDZ, is scheduled to reach R4-billion in the period 2011-2016.Port Elizabeth’s port has for many years been the site of a manganese-exporting facility. The idea is to move that to Ngqura, together with the existing liquid-bulk terminal.Once these facilities are located away from the Port of Port Elizabeth, large parts of the harbour will be available for redevelopment for retail and leisure. This has been a plan for some time, part of a broader plan to revitalise the harbour and neighbouring beachfront.The Nelson Mandela Bay Metropolitan Municipality, through its Mandela Bay Development Agency (MBDA), has plans to spend R40-million on beachfront development. The MBDA has spent R250-million on upgrading Govan Mbeki Avenue and other parts of the inner city. It has also supported 67 tourism projects.The province’s automotive producers export just more than half of the motor vehicles produced in South Africa. The companies that operate in the Eastern Cape are Mercedes-Benz SA (East London), Volkswagen (Uitenhage), and General Motors South Africa and Ford, both in Port Elizabeth. The Ford plant assembles engines.All of these companies have invested heavily in increased production in recent years. These operations support many subsidiary industries such as pressed steel, plastics, and leather for car seats. Port Elizabeth has become a world leader in the production of catalytic converters.The Nelson Mandela Bay Logistics Park (NMBLP) serves as an automotive cluster, supplying logistical support and economies of scale for companies servicing the motor industry in Port Elizabeth and Uitenhage. National government has allocated R30- million to this project in its medium-term expenditure framework.The East London Industrial Development Zone has a similar initiative which is attracting automotive-supply companies.The province’s exports have been doing well in recent times, driven by a large increase in vehicle sales. Volkswagen Group South Africa won the Exporter of the Year in 2011, awarded by the Nelson Mandela Bay Business Chamber.Howden Donkin, a company making fans, blowers and accessories, won the award for exporting by smaller businesses. Morgan Cargo was acknowledged for its excellent service to exporters.Other major manufacturing sectors in the province are food and beverages (Cadbury, Nestle, SAB, Clover, Dairybelle) and pharmaceutical (Aspen).Key factsThe Eastern Cape extends over 169 580 square kilometres, representing 13.9% of South Africa’s land mass.The province has more livestock than any other province, with a fifth of the country’s cattle, a quarter of its sheep and nearly half its goats. Mohair is a speciality of the Karoo region.The province’s population of 6.9 million makes it the country’s third-most populous province, with about 15% of the national population.TourismTourism is a major growth industry. Addo Elephant National Park is the largest of the province’s four national parks and there are more than a dozen provincial parks and a growing number of private game farms, lodges and reserves.The province’s beaches and waves are very popular, with adventure tourism luring in tourists wanting to go on 4×4 trails, jump off bridges or fly microlight aircraft.Alternative energiesThe Eastern Cape receives a lot of sunlight and it has areas along its coastline that can easily transfer wind into energy. These and other options in the alternative energy field, including biofuels, are being actively investigated with some sizable investments already having been made.InvestmentProvincial government expenditure in the Eastern Cape was 60.5% higher in March 2011 than it was in March 2010. This is according to the Eastern Cape Barometer, an economic tracking programme that is a joint initiative of Sake24 and BoE Private Clients.The biggest growth subsectors were agriculture, transport and manufacturing but it was the state spending that took the province’s Barometer growth index to its highest- ever point – 19%.According to the provincial Department of Economic Development and Environmental Affairs, total gross domestic fixed investment in the Eastern Cape has been dominated by the machinery/other equipment and building and construction sectors over the last 13 years. The machinery/other equipment sector contributed 44% of fixed investment in the period 1995-2008, with building and construction averaging 41% in the same period.Mega-projects such as the refinery and the manganese plant together with the huge amounts of money committed by motor manufacturers and suppliers are signs of the growing confidence in the Eastern Cape as an investment destination.Other significant investments made into the region in the course of 2009 and 2010 were:A diamond-beneficiation project in the East London Industrial Development Zone. This will help South Africa to beneficiate more of its own resources and create opportunities for skilled employment.The Sunningdale Dairy being established in the ELIDZ.The construction of the SAS Radisson Port Elizabeth (Radisson Blu Hotel), an investment of R320-million and a significant addition to the tourism offering of the region.A facility in the ELIDZ intended to produce 300 000 flat-panel solar-water heaters, as well as more affordable vacuum-based systems per year. The Eastern Cape Development Corporation (ECDC) holds 15% equity in a firm of mostly Taiwanese investors and is putting R20-million of the R33-million capital into the start-up. Some 250 direct and indirect jobs will be created.The opening of the R1.5-billion Hemingways Mall in East London. Put together by the Billion Group, at 210 000 square metres, it is the biggest shopping centre in the Eastern Cape.The investment in two call centres in the Coega IDZ.Several wind-farm projects are either being constructed or are under consideration. Belgian company Electrawinds has started installing 25 wind turbines at Coega Industrial Development Zone while Rainmaker Energy, an independent power producer (IPP), is planning two new wind-power projects in the Eastern Cape, the Dorper project and the AB’s project. Together, the two projects will generate 610 megawatts.Other municipalitiesAlfred Nzo District MunicipalityTowns: Matatiele, Mount Frere, Mount AyliffThe smallest district is located in the mountainous north-east, with hiking trails being an attraction for tourists. Subsistence agriculture and forestry are the major economic activities.Cacadu District MunicipalityTowns: Graaff-Reinet, Cradock, Humansdorp, Jeffreys Bay, GrahamstownThe western part of the province contains the biggest municipality and is one of the biggest contributors to provincial GDP. Large commercial farms in the Karoo produce quality meat, wool and mohair, while the coastal belt has dairy farming and some forestry. The Kouga Valley is a big deciduous fruit producer, while the area around Kirkwood/Addo is known for its citrus.Cacadu has three of the region’s national parks (Camdeboo, Tsitsikamma and Addo Elephant Park) and several private game farms. Grahamstown is the venue of the National Arts Festival, while Jeffreys Bay is among the top surfing spots in the world.Chris Hani District MunicipalityTowns: Middelburg, Molteno, Dordrecht, Queenstown, Lady Frere, ElliotSheep farming is an important part of the economy. Some coal is found in the north and tourist activities include fly-fishing. The Nola factory in Molteno manufactures Ouma rusks. The Grootfontein Agricultural College and Research Station is in Middelburg, and the Marlow Agricultural College is near Cradock.OR Tambo District MunicipalityTowns: Mthatha, Coffee Bay, Port St Johns, Qumbu, Bizana, FlagstaffOR Tambo District Municipality encompasses some of the province’s least-developed areas and contains one of South Africa’s most important ecological areas, the Pondoland Centre of Plant Endemism. Mining is already pursued in some areas, but plans to allow titanium mining on seaside dunes are being contested.There is great potential for tourism. A Wild Coast Spatial Development Initiative exists to plot further development. Magwa Tea Estate and forestry concerns are among the biggest employers.Joe Gqabi District MunicipalityTowns: Aliwal North, Burgersdorp, Lady Grey, Rhodes, Barkly East, UgieCattle and sheep farming make up 80% of land use, while commercial forestry is a big contributor to employment. The hot springs at Aliwal North and skiing at Tiffendell are two major tourist attractions.This is an edited version of an article published by Frontier Market Network. Republished here with kind permission. Copyright © Frontier Market Intelligence Ltd. All rights reservedReviewed: September 2013last_img read more

China Lifts Ban on US Poultry Imports

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest By Todd NeeleyDTN Staff ReporterOMAHA (DTN) — Poultry exports from the United States to China will resume after the Chinese government lifted a four-year ban on Thursday, as the nation struggles to meet protein demands in light of the African swine fever outbreak.The lifting of the ban is effective immediately. China imposed the ban in 2015, responding to avian influenza outbreaks in the U.S.; the U.S. has been free of avian influenza since 2017.The news was welcome relief for U.S. poultry producers. The National Chicken Council, National Turkey Federation and the USA Poultry and Egg Export Council released a joint statement following the announcement.“Lifting the ban has been a top priority of the U.S. poultry industry for the past four years,” the groups said. “We thank President Trump, Agriculture Secretary (Sonny) Perdue, U.S. Trade Representative (Robert) Lighthizer, Treasury Secretary (Steve) Mnuchin, congressional leaders and their staffs, all of whom have worked tirelessly to reach an agreement with China and ensure the poultry industry has access to this market.”At its peak, annual poultry exports from the U.S. to China was a $71 million market for turkey and a $722 million market for chicken. The groups said renewed access to the Chinese market could result in $1 billion annually for “chicken paws alone.”In addition, they said there could be another $1 billion of potential exports of other chicken products, including leg and breast meat. Turkey exports could generate another $100 million in sales and poultry breeding stock at least $60 million more.“America’s poultry producers are committed to raising high-quality, nutritious products, and we are extremely pleased that we will once again have the opportunity to share these products with Chinese consumers,” the groups said.Lighthizer and Perdue issued statements regarding China’s decision.“The United States welcomes China’s decision to finally lift its unwarranted ban on U.S. poultry and poultry products,” Lighthizer said. “This is great news for both America’s farmers and China’s consumers. China is an important export market for America’s poultry farmers and we estimate they will now be able to export more than $1 billion worth of poultry and poultry products each year to China. Reopening China to U.S. poultry will create new export opportunities for our poultry farmers and support thousands of workers employed by the U.S. poultry industry.”Perdue said, “After being shut out of the market for years, U.S. poultry producers and exporters welcome the reopening of China’s market to their products. America’s producers are the most productive in the world and it is critical they be able to sell their bounty to consumers in other parts of the globe. We will continue our work to expand market access in important markets like China as well as other countries, to support our producers and U.S. jobs.”The U.S. exported more than $500 million worth of poultry products to China in 2013, prior to the 2014 avian influenza outbreak.The U.S. is the world’s second-largest poultry exporter, with global exports of poultry meat and products of $4.3 billion last year.Todd Neeley can be reached at [email protected] him on Twitter @toddneeleyDTN(SK/CZ)© Copyright 2019 DTN/The Progressive Farmer. All rights reserved.last_img read more

Humphrey’s Archipelago GC1ZPE8 GEOCACHE OF THE WEEK – January 9, 2012

first_img SharePrint RelatedThe British Library — Geocache of the WeekJune 28, 2017In “Community”Down, down, down into the underground – Below Above, The Fallen Monarch (GC2GAMT) – Geocache of the WeekApril 3, 2013In “Community”Slapjais Kakis/Wet Cat — Geocache of the WeekSeptember 24, 2019In “Community” Lighthouse near Douglas on the Isle of ManSome geocaches take just seconds to find, others require days to unravel. Humphrey’s Archipelago (GC1ZPE8) is a Multi-Cache that can challenge geocachers for days. It’s a puzzle that has left geocachers saying, “an excellent geocache,” “very imaginative,” and “brilliant.”The difficulty 2.5, terrain 2 geocache weaves the story of a fictitious Victorian explorer named Sir Humphrey Humphrey.The cache requires following Sir Humphrey Humphrey’s whimsical story. Geocachers discover a faded map near a lighthouse on the Isle of Man. They then use the map and clues from an additional image on the cache page to answer the question, “Where did Sir Humphrey stay on his first night in the archipelago?”Happy Humphrey created the creative geocache in 2009. The Woodsider IOM now owns and maintains the geocache.Part of the adventure is catching glimpses of wildlife as you search for the location of the geocache. Happy Humphrey writes, ‘Look out to sea on the way; whales, dolphins, seals and basking sharks are often seen here (there was a Minke whale in sight when I first researched the cache.)”Geocachers who logged a smiley on the cache write, “Brilliant cache just loved the first clue – never seen anything like it it before.”Clue from cache pageContinue to explore of some of the most engaging geocaches around the globe. Explore all the Geocaches of the Week on the Latitude 47 blog or view the Bookmark List on Geocaching.com. If you’ d like to nominate a Geocache of the Week, send an email with your name, comments, the name of the geocache, and the GC code to [email protected] with your Friends:Morelast_img read more