China Lifts Ban on US Poultry Imports

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest By Todd NeeleyDTN Staff ReporterOMAHA (DTN) — Poultry exports from the United States to China will resume after the Chinese government lifted a four-year ban on Thursday, as the nation struggles to meet protein demands in light of the African swine fever outbreak.The lifting of the ban is effective immediately. China imposed the ban in 2015, responding to avian influenza outbreaks in the U.S.; the U.S. has been free of avian influenza since 2017.The news was welcome relief for U.S. poultry producers. The National Chicken Council, National Turkey Federation and the USA Poultry and Egg Export Council released a joint statement following the announcement.“Lifting the ban has been a top priority of the U.S. poultry industry for the past four years,” the groups said. “We thank President Trump, Agriculture Secretary (Sonny) Perdue, U.S. Trade Representative (Robert) Lighthizer, Treasury Secretary (Steve) Mnuchin, congressional leaders and their staffs, all of whom have worked tirelessly to reach an agreement with China and ensure the poultry industry has access to this market.”At its peak, annual poultry exports from the U.S. to China was a $71 million market for turkey and a $722 million market for chicken. The groups said renewed access to the Chinese market could result in $1 billion annually for “chicken paws alone.”In addition, they said there could be another $1 billion of potential exports of other chicken products, including leg and breast meat. Turkey exports could generate another $100 million in sales and poultry breeding stock at least $60 million more.“America’s poultry producers are committed to raising high-quality, nutritious products, and we are extremely pleased that we will once again have the opportunity to share these products with Chinese consumers,” the groups said.Lighthizer and Perdue issued statements regarding China’s decision.“The United States welcomes China’s decision to finally lift its unwarranted ban on U.S. poultry and poultry products,” Lighthizer said. “This is great news for both America’s farmers and China’s consumers. China is an important export market for America’s poultry farmers and we estimate they will now be able to export more than $1 billion worth of poultry and poultry products each year to China. Reopening China to U.S. poultry will create new export opportunities for our poultry farmers and support thousands of workers employed by the U.S. poultry industry.”Perdue said, “After being shut out of the market for years, U.S. poultry producers and exporters welcome the reopening of China’s market to their products. America’s producers are the most productive in the world and it is critical they be able to sell their bounty to consumers in other parts of the globe. We will continue our work to expand market access in important markets like China as well as other countries, to support our producers and U.S. jobs.”The U.S. exported more than $500 million worth of poultry products to China in 2013, prior to the 2014 avian influenza outbreak.The U.S. is the world’s second-largest poultry exporter, with global exports of poultry meat and products of $4.3 billion last year.Todd Neeley can be reached at [email protected] him on Twitter @toddneeleyDTN(SK/CZ)© Copyright 2019 DTN/The Progressive Farmer. All rights reserved.last_img read more

Sarovar dam-hit fishermen grapple with altering breeding patterns

first_imgHundreds of farmers, potters and fishermen from 178 villages that were submerged by the backwaters of the Narmada, marched to the office of the Narmada Valley Development Authority in Bhopal demanding rehabilitation and alternative employment on Saturday.Ever since the Sardar Sarovar dam downstream was filled to the brim, the Narmada has developed an erratic current and an unstable course, posing a challenge to fishermen in Madhya Pradesh. “When the backwaters swelled, the catch dwindled dramatically. And now, several species have become extinct in the river,” says Mansarovar Verma, 53, a fisherman of Chikhalda village in Barwani district. “We don’t want contractors from outside to take over water bodies. Local fishermen have a traditional right to them,” said Medha Patkar, of the Narmada Bachao Andolan, who led the rally and then staged a dharna with the protesters.Fall in catch “Water has entered forests, and dead leaves are detrimental to fish. Furthermore, garbage from submerged villages has caused a large-scale pollution of the river,” said Mr. Verma.He now catches 2-4 kg of fish a day, earning only up to ₹400 a day. Three months ago, he netted 8-10 kg, bringing home ₹1,000 a day. “We want compensation or land for the loss incurred. We don’t want to work for a fishing contractor, who’ll set terms for us,” he said. Earlier, a drop in the water level after the monsoon gave them an opportunity to cultivate muskmelon and watermelon on the river banks around the month of January. After the water level rose, this too became impossible. The government has opened 32 societies for fishermen in Dhar, Barwani and Khargone districts, which share the river’s banks, to dispel the fears about contractors taking over fishing. Several species, including ‘mahseer’, has gone extinct.last_img read more