No savings at 40? I’d buy FTSE 100 dividend stocks in an ISA to retire on a passive income

first_imgNo savings at 40? I’d buy FTSE 100 dividend stocks in an ISA to retire on a passive income Peter Stephens | Tuesday, 18th February, 2020 Image source: Getty Images Peter Stephens has no position in any of the shares mentioned. The Motley Fool UK has no position in any of the shares mentioned. Views expressed on the companies mentioned in this article are those of the writer and therefore may differ from the official recommendations we make in our subscription services such as Share Advisor, Hidden Winners and Pro. Here at The Motley Fool we believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors. I’m sure you’ll agree that’s quite the statement from Motley Fool Co-Founder Tom Gardner.But since our US analyst team first recommended shares in this unique tech stock back in 2016, the value has soared.What’s more, we firmly believe there’s still plenty of upside in its future. 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Because we’re offering a full 33% off your first year of membership to our flagship share-tipping service, backed by our ‘no quibbles’ 30-day subscription fee refund guarantee. See all posts by Peter Stephens Enter Your Email Address I would like to receive emails from you about product information and offers from The Fool and its business partners. Each of these emails will provide a link to unsubscribe from future emails. More information about how The Fool collects, stores, and handles personal data is available in its Privacy Statement. Having no savings at age 40 doesn’t mean a passive income in retirement is beyond your reach. After all, there are still likely to be 25+ years left until you retire. During this time, you could build a generous retirement portfolio.One way of improving your chances of obtaining a worthwhile passive income in retirement is to invest in FTSE 100 shares. They currently appear to offer good value for money in many cases, and could produce significantly higher returns than other assets, such as bonds, cash and property.5G is here – and shares of this ‘sleeping giant’ could be a great way for you to potentially profit!According to one leading industry firm, the 5G boom could create a global industry worth US$12.3 TRILLION out of thin air…And if you click here we’ll show you something that could be key to unlocking 5G’s full potential…When purchased through a Stocks and Shares ISA, FTSE 100 companies could offer an even more impressive return due to an ISA’s tax efficiency. As such, now could be the right time to start investing for your retirement.Return prospectsBuying dividend shares may not appear to be the right move for someone who’s aiming to build a retirement portfolio over a 25+ year period. However, the track record of the FTSE 100 shows a large proportion of its total returns have historically derived from the reinvestment of dividends. As such, focusing your capital on higher-yielding shares, which have the potential to raise dividends at a fast pace over the coming years, could prove to be a shrewd move.In addition, the FTSE 100 seems to offer good value for money at the present time. It has a yield of 4.4%, which is above its long-term average, while sectors such as retail, resources and financial services continue to be unpopular among investors. As such, the companies operating within them may offer wide margins of safety which ultimately enable them to produce impressive returns in the long run.Relative appealOf course, it may be tempting to invest in assets such as cash, bonds and property. Historically, they’ve produced favourable returns in many cases. However, their outlooks appear to be less impressive than those of the FTSE 100.For example, low interest rates could persist in the coming years due to the risks associated with Brexit and a low rate of inflation. This may mean that obtaining a positive after-inflation return from cash and bonds is a tough task. Likewise, tax changes and question marks about the affordability of housing may mean buy-to-let investments become less attractive in terms of their return prospects.Investing todayTherefore, now could be the right time to start buying FTSE 100 shares through a tax-efficient account such as a Stocks and Shares ISA. It’s simple and cheap to open, and may improve your long-term returns.Even starting to invest with modest sums of money can lead to surprisingly large amounts in the long run. As such, even if you only have a small amount of spare cash available each month, gradually buying large-cap shares and allowing compounding to boost your returns could improve your retirement prospects.last_img read more

‘All Saints’ movie details how refugees saved struggling Episcopal church

first_img Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Tags Submit a Job Listing The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Smithfield, NC Featured Events Featured Jobs & Calls Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Tampa, FL Rector Washington, DC TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Submit a Press Release Rector Knoxville, TN Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Martinsville, VA Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Refugees Migration & Resettlement Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Pittsburgh, PA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Press Release Service Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Submit an Event Listing Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Associate Rector Columbus, GA Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Albany, NY Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Director of Music Morristown, NJ By Amy SowderPosted Aug 25, 2017 Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI ‘All Saints’ movie details how refugees saved struggling Episcopal church Curate Diocese of Nebraska Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Belleville, IL Rector Hopkinsville, KY Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Bath, NC Besides Ye Win’s starring role, all the Karen parishioners in “All Saints” were real parishioners at All Saints’ Episcopal Church in Smyrna, Tennessee. Photo: “All Saints” via Facebook[Episcopal News Service] After a split over theology in the 1990s, there were only 12 members of the congregation left at All Saints’ Episcopal Church in Smyrna, Tennessee, a suburb south of Nashville. The church couldn’t pay its mortgage. By 2007, the church was in danger of closing.Today, 130 to 150 parishioners attend Sunday services. Many worshipers filling those pews – barefoot after leaving their flip-flops at the door – are Karen refugees, an ethnic minority from Burma (called Myanmar by its military government). The church’s mortgage is paid off. It even has a community farm now.At All Saints’, it was the refugees who saved the Americans.Los Angeles director Steve Gomer found the transformation of this struggling Southern congregation so inspiring that he moved his family to Nashville to create a fictionalized film about it. The Sony Pictures movie “All Saints” opened Aug. 25 in 800 theaters nationwide, starring John Corbett (“Northern Exposure,” “Sex and the City” and “My Big Fat Greek Wedding”) as the real-life Rev. Michael Spurlock, Cara Buono (“Mad Men” and “Stranger Things”) as Spurlock’s wife, Aimee Spurlock, and Nelson Lee (“Law & Order,” “Oz” and “Blade: The Series”) playing Ye Win, a Karen leader.Inspired by the Karen refugee story at All Saints’ Episcopal Church in Smyrna, Tennessee, the Sony Pictures film “All Saints” releases nationwide Aug. 25 and in Europe and United Kingdom the week afterward. Photo: “All Saints” via Facebook“The real story is remarkable. We had to change very little to make it dramatic,” Gomer told the Episcopal News Service. “You have these extraordinary people who went out of their way to say, ‘Yes, we’re here. Let’s form this community.’ I think the picture is moving but honest. It’s not saccharine.”A lifelong Anglican, like many Karen, Ye Win and other refugees showed up at the church in 2007, asking to farm some of the church’s 20 acres to feed their families. More than 100,000 Karen live in a refugee camp on the border of Thailand and Burma. The ongoing civil war has earned them refugee status in the U.S., and they receive government support for three months after arrival. Then, they’re largely on their own.The Trump administration’s temporary refugee ban makes this film even more timely, said the Rev. Robert Rhea, part-time vicar at All Saints’ since June 2016 and a full-time emergency-room physician. This is his first appointed post since graduating from Nashotah House Theological Seminary.“The film has a broader impact for all Christians and faith communities. What do we do with the refugees and immigrants in our midst? How do we reach out and welcome them as God wants us to?” Rhea asked.In the film, as in life, businessman-turned-pastor Spurlock had arrived recently at the church when Ye Win showed up. Spurlock had planned to close the struggling church. But the Karen’s farming of spinach, sour leaf and other foods not only fed their families, it helped the congregation. They were able to sell the extra crops at nearby markets to help pay the church’s bills. Yet everyone had to pitch in.“Nobody knew what we were getting in for, as far as labor,” the real Spurlock said in a clip. “It is back-breaking work.”The film crew shoots a church service for “All Saints,” a feature film out Aug. 25 in theaters across the United States. Photo: “All Saints” via FacebookTo research the film, Gomer attended services and family dinners. He participated in pastoral duties, such as transporting Karen people to doctor’s appointments and tutoring. Gomer is Jewish and active in his synagogue, but he’d been interested in doing a film that he cared about, something showing the difficulties clergy members experience.“At dinner at Ye Win’s house, my wife and I realized we were sort of in a time machine. We were sitting with our great-grandparents from Russia, who had a very similar experience in the 1890s as refugees and immigrants,” Gomer said. “That’s who the United States is. Building community. This is our story, and it’s any refugee’s story, although there are special circumstances in this story to make it even better.”These days, there’s one Sunday service with the homily preached in both languages, as are the prayers and hymns.Lisa Lehr moved to Smyrna in 2013. She wasn’t Episcopalian but decided to join the church after a Karen woman from All Saints’ hugged her on Palm Sunday in 2014.“They made me feel like I was there with them, that they were my community, or they could be my community if I accepted it, and I did,” said Lehr, a volunteer Christian educator and now a member of the All Saints’ Mission Council.The Episcopal Diocese of Tennessee, led by Bishop John Bauerschmidt, is sponsoring a special free showing of the film Aug. 26 for members of the diocese. At the premiere on Aug. 3, all the stars showed up on the red carpet, with cameras and hoopla. During the film’s credits, viewers can see clips of the real congregation and what they’re doing today.“People, not particularly Christian, I hope they will see it and be moved,” Rhea said. “This story is very, very appropriate for these times.”— Amy Sowder is a special correspondent for the Episcopal News Service, and a writer and editor living in Brooklyn, New York. Rector Collierville, TN Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Shreveport, LA last_img read more