Premier Oil shares: Is it time to buy or sell?

first_imgPremier Oil shares: Is it time to buy or sell? Simply click below to discover how you can take advantage of this. With Brent crude now priced at over $40, it’s evident that oil has made a decent recovery. This resulted in the Premier Oil (LSE: PMO) share price rising over 300%, to 54p. It is currently around 42p. While there has been a slight recovery in the oil sector, problems still abound. As such, is the Premier Oil share price a definite buy or is it destined for a decline?Balance sheet weaknessPremier Oil has one of the weakest balance sheets in the oil sector, and I believe this could weigh heavily on its share price. Currently, the firm has $1.97bn of debt, compared to just over $200m of cash, and $1.1bn in shareholder’s equity. This is an excessive amount of debt in normal times, but in the current economic climate it’s a significant worry. Royal Dutch Shell and BP have recently had to write down the value of their assets. Similar action could be a major problem for Premier Oil, especially because its debt-to-equity ratio already stands at around 180%.5G is here – and shares of this ‘sleeping giant’ could be a great way for you to potentially profit!According to one leading industry firm, the 5G boom could create a global industry worth US$12.3 TRILLION out of thin air…And if you click here we’ll show you something that could be key to unlocking 5G’s full potential…What does the future hold in store?The oil major has recently announced the acquisition of BP’s Andrew Area and its Shearwater assets in a deal worth up to $565m. This was slightly lower than the original price, and only $210m will have to paid up front. It is also stated that the new assets will be “immediately cash generative” and will therefore help the firm reduce its debts.While this sounds good in principle, I do have some concerns about the deal. For example, it seems an odd time to be making expensive acquisitions, especially in the firm’s indebted position. As a result, many analysts believe that it will have to raise funds from shareholders in order to complete the deal. Equity funding has the result of diluting existing shareholders, and the Premier Oil share price should fall as a result.Is the Premier Oil share price too cheap to ignore?Premier Oil shares are down around 60% this year, with key metrics proving it’s a significantly undervalued stock. For example, it has a current price-to-earnings ratio of 2.7 and a price-to-book ratio of just 0.4.But I’d take both of these values with a pinch of salt. Firstly, earnings should drastically decrease over the next few years, and this means that the current price-to-earnings ratio is not an accurate representation. The price-to-book ratio also doesn’t take into account the fact that many of the assets on the balance sheet are also overvalued.In this respect, I believe that Premier Oil shares are too risky. While there is significant potential upside, bankruptcy is also a genuine worry. This would leave shareholders with nothing. If I were to bet on an oil recovery, I’d buy Royal Dutch Shell shares instead. Stuart Blair | Thursday, 23rd July, 2020 | More on: HBR I’m sure you’ll agree that’s quite the statement from Motley Fool Co-Founder Tom Gardner.But since our US analyst team first recommended shares in this unique tech stock back in 2016, the value has soared.What’s more, we firmly believe there’s still plenty of upside in its future. In fact, even throughout the current coronavirus crisis, its performance has been beating Wall St expectations.And right now, we’re giving you a chance to discover exactly what has got our analysts all fired up about this niche industry phenomenon, in our FREE special report, A Top US Share From The Motley Fool. Stuart Blair owns shares in Royal Dutch Shell. The Motley Fool UK has no position in any of the shares mentioned. Views expressed on the companies mentioned in this article are those of the writer and therefore may differ from the official recommendations we make in our subscription services such as Share Advisor, Hidden Winners and Pro. Here at The Motley Fool we believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors. Our 6 ‘Best Buys Now’ Shares Enter Your Email Addresscenter_img “This Stock Could Be Like Buying Amazon in 1997” Click here to claim your copy now — and we’ll tell you the name of this Top US Share… free of charge! Renowned stock-picker Mark Rogers and his analyst team at The Motley Fool UK have named 6 shares that they believe UK investors should consider buying NOW.So if you’re looking for more stock ideas to try and best position your portfolio today, then it might be a good day for you. Because we’re offering a full 33% off your first year of membership to our flagship share-tipping service, backed by our ‘no quibbles’ 30-day subscription fee refund guarantee. Image source: Getty Images. I would like to receive emails from you about product information and offers from The Fool and its business partners. Each of these emails will provide a link to unsubscribe from future emails. More information about how The Fool collects, stores, and handles personal data is available in its Privacy Statement. See all posts by Stuart Blairlast_img read more

Charlie Hebdo editor’s acquittal in Mohammed cartoon case hailed as positive for French society

first_img RSF denounces Total’s retaliation against Le Monde for Myanmar story to go further FranceEurope – Central Asia FranceEurope – Central Asia June 4, 2021 Find out more A Paris criminal court today cleared Philippe Val, the editor of the French satirical weekly Charlie Hebdo, of “publicly abusing a group of people because of their religion” by publishing cartoons of the Prophet Mohammed. Reporters Without Borders welcomes the verdict and hopes it will set a judicial precedent. Help by sharing this information Receive email alerts News Use the Digital Services Act to make democracy prevail over platform interests, RSF tells EU News “We’ll hold Ilham Aliyev personally responsible if anything happens to this blogger in France” RSF says March 22, 2007 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Charlie Hebdo editor’s acquittal in Mohammed cartoon case hailed as positive for French society RSF_en Organisation Follow the news on France News June 2, 2021 Find out more News Reporters Without Borders hailed a Paris criminal court’s decision today to clear Philippe Val, the editor of the French satirical weekly Charlie Hebdo, of “publicly abusing a group of people because of their religion” by publishing cartoons of the Prophet Mohammed a year ago. The case was brought by the Paris Grand Mosque, the Union of Islamic Organisations of France (UOIF) and the World Islamic League.“The court’s verdict accords with the French republic’s values and is good for French society as a whole,” the press freedom organisation said. “We hail the judges’ finding that the limits of free expression were not exceeded in this case. This ruling is a victory for press freedom and in no way is a defeat for a community. We hope it will set a judicial precedent.”The UOIF announced that it would appeal, but the Paris Grand Mosque said it would not.The outcome of this key trial for the defence of press freedom follows a similar decision by Danish judges acquitting the editors of the Danish daily Jyllands-Posten, the first newspaper to publish controversial cartoons of Mohammed.In the French case, the three plaintiffs had demanded 30,000 euros in damages from Charlie Hebdo, while the French public prosecutor’s office had recommended acquittal. Val had additionally faced a possible sentence of six months in prison and a fine of 22,500 euros. As he left the court today, he expressed his satisfaction and confidence in the French judicial system, commenting: “We have been vindicated by the court.”Val had received strong backing not only from French journalists but also many politicians, including UDF presidential candidate François Bayrou and French Socialist Party leader François Hollande, who voiced their support for the weekly during the two-day trial on 7 and 8 February. Interior minister Nicolas Sarkozy, the UMP presidential candidate, had also indicated his support, commenting that he preferred “an excess of cartoons to a lack of cartoons.”The lawsuit concerned three of the six Mohammed cartoons which the weekly published on 8 February 2006. Two of the three had appeared in Jyllands-Posten in 2005. One of them showed Mohammed wearing a turban in the form of a bomb about to explode. The other showed him saying: “Stop, stop, we have run out of virgins.” The third, which was on the cover, was by French cartoonist Jean “Cabu” Cabut. It showed Mohammed with his head in his hands saying: “It is hard to be loved by idiots.” May 10, 2021 Find out morelast_img read more