Nimitz-Class Aircraft Carrier USS Carl Vinson Celebrates Christmas at Sea

first_img View post tag: Aircraft View post tag: Navy Training & Education Share this article View post tag: Carl View post tag: Carrier View post tag: News by topic View post tag: Nimitz-Class View post tag: sea View post tag: celebratescenter_img View post tag: Naval View post tag: Christmas December 28, 2011 Back to overview,Home naval-today Nimitz-Class Aircraft Carrier USS Carl Vinson Celebrates Christmas at Sea View post tag: Vinson Nimitz-Class Aircraft Carrier USS Carl Vinson Celebrates Christmas at Sea View post tag: USS Sailors assigned to Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Carl Vinson (CVN 70) and embarked Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 17 celebrated the holiday at sea with a Christmas dinner Dec. 25.More than 4,000 Sailors gathered to feast on 6,000 pounds of food, ranging from roast pig and poached shrimp to mashed potatoes and stuffing.“What we do is a morale booster for the crew,” said Master Chief Culinary Specialist (SW/AW) Wilfred Cheong, Supply Department’s S-2 Division leading chief petty officer. “I hope for all who celebrate Christmas, it will bring back memories of home.”The enlisted mess decks were adorned with red and green table cloths, Christmas trees and lights. Chief petty officers donned aprons and greeted each Sailor as they helped the galley crew serve the meal.Electronic Attack Squadron (VAQ) 134 Command Master Chief (CMDCM) (SW/AW) William Goforth, volunteered his time to help in the scullery, collecting and washing dishes and utensils.“I did my mess duty 29 years ago,” he said. “I remember the scullery being a hard spot to work in so I took on the challenge of helping in one of the hardest jobs in the galley for Christmas. It shows we do know how tough it is, and it’s a good way to say Happy Holidays.”As the crew satisfied their hunger with honey glazed ham and candied yams, holiday greetings from family members and friends back home played over the ship’s internal television system. For many Vinson Sailors this was their second consecutive Christmas deployed.“Despite being away from my family, this Christmas turned out really well,” said Machinist’s Mate 3rd Class Clive Lindsay, assigned to Reactor Department’s Damage Control Division. “I spent time with my friends doing holiday arts and crafts, and we made a point to have Christmas dinner together.”Carl Vinson and CVW 17 are currently underway on a Western Pacific deployment.[mappress]Naval Today Staff , December 28, 2011; Image: navylast_img read more

Msgr. Tom Hartman, of God Squad Fame, Dies

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York Msgr. Thomas Hartman, the Roman Catholic priest from Long Island nationally known as half of the God Squad, a popular television show about religion, died following a years-long battle with Parkinson’s disease. He was 69.Father Tom, as he was known, became a household name with Rabbi Marc Gellman following the success of the TV show they co-hosted for 20 years on Telecare, the faith-based cable network that Hartman ran for the Diocese of Rockville Centre. The show led to a nationally-syndicated newspaper column, as well as regular TV and radio appearances on shows with larger audiences than their own, such as Good Morning America. After his diagnosis, Hartman stepped back from the spotlight and founded a charity that donated millions to find a cure for Parkinson’s.“Our friendship produced many words, but it never needed words,” Gellman wrote in his Newsday column Wednesday eulogizing Hartman. “Tommy taught me that smiles are more important than words, and I do not need words now to remember that transformative wisdom.” Hartman grew up in East Williston before entering the Hempstead seminary when he was in the ninth grade after passing up his dream of becoming a baseball player and instead joining the clergy like his uncle, aunts and cousins before him. He was ordained in 1971 and eight years later graduated with a Doctor of Ministry degree from the Jesuit School of Theology at Berkley.Hartman was also a parish priest at St. Vincent de Paul in Elmont and a chaplain for the Nassau County Police Department. Hartman joined forces with Gellman, the Rabbi Emeritus of Temple Beth Torah in Melville, after the two met while discussion religion on News12 Long Island. The next day, they formed the God Squad, in which the straight-laced Hartman and quick-witted Gellman discussed morality and religion.The duo eventually became LI’s best-known clergymen, making appearances on national cable news networks. They were even animated for an HBO children’s special based on their book of the same name, How Do You Spell God? But if they ever struggled to balance their fame and their duties, it never showed.”I’m definitely the straight man,” Hartman told The New York Times during the height of their fame in the ‘90s. ”Marc is much funnier than I and more vocal. I’m quieter. I want Marc to be the star. To some degree I’ve had more fame. Initially he had to gain it. So it was bigger in his mind. And in many ways he’s more talented than I.”In 2003, Hartman broke the news of his diagnoses in his newspaper column, which had only launched a year prior. He had kept it secret for four years by that point. Gellman still writes the column for Tribune Media Services, but visited Hartman weekly at the nursing home where Father Tom lived until his passing.Hartman’s charity donations led to the formation of the Thomas Hartman Foundation for Parkinson Research  in the Department of Neurobiology & Behavior at Stony Brook University. Funeral arrangements have not yet been announced.last_img read more