Fearless mum braves Donegal’s rough seas to raise over €23,000

first_imgA Donegal-based mum braved the choppy waters of West Donegal to complete a hugely successful charity swim last weekend.Fiona Harrington (27) swam from Owey to Cruit Island on Saturday to raise money for the BUMBLEance children’s ambulance service.While she isn’t an experienced swimmer, Fiona ventured into the water for the 1km swim while her family and friends cheered her on. Speaking to Donegal Daily, Fiona admitted that she was a ‘bit sore’ the day after the swim but overwhelmed to raise more than €23,000 so far. Fiona Harrington’s charity swim from Owey-Cruit Island in aid of BUMBLEanceFiona Harrington’s charity swim from Owey-Cruit Island in aid of BUMBLEanceThe entire feat was inspired by Fiona and her partner Dwain Rodgers’ baby girl, Willow.Willow is seven months old and was born with a life-limiting condition called Smith-Lemli-Opitz.The birth defects caused by the disorder make travelling a huge challenge for the family. But the BUMBLEance service made Fiona and Dwain’s dreams come true in August when they helped them fly with Willow to Bere Island in Cork for a special visit to see Fiona’s parents.“Willow is on oxygen, a feeding tube and morphine. We would never have been able to drive to Cork ourselves. “BUMBLEance flew us from Carrickfinn Airport, which is just behind our house, to Kerry. Then they had a BUMBLEance for us on the runway and brought us to the ferry. It was so nice to bring her to my home. They made our dream come true.”Fiona, who is originally from Cork, was so amazed by the charity service that she wanted to do something to give back.She came up with the idea of an island-island swim, but never expected to raise so much money.So far, the total raised between online and offline donations is estimated at €23,000.Fiona Harrington’s charity swim from Owey-Cruit Island in aid of BUMBLEanceFiona said: “I can’t believe it. At the start, I only expected to get a thousand euro, maybe two.” Looking back on the swim, Fiona said that Saturday’s sea conditions were a challenge during the 40 minute journey.“It was a bit wavy out. I was definitely rougher than I thought it would be,” she said.“It took me a while to get into it at the start. We started on land and I had to swim out through a cove but there was a strong drag there.“I was joined by John Green from the Arranmore Fast Ferry and Judith, a woman from Belfast. “My dad was in a rib with the Arranmore Fast Ferry that came alongside us and he got in to swim beside me at the halfway point. And Dwain was in a rib on our other side taking photos.”Fiona Harrington’s charity swim from Owey-Cruit Island in aid of BUMBLEanceFiona had great support from the Arranmore Fast Ferry and said that she is thankful to every person who donated and helped with the charity swim.There is still time to donate and if you would like to support BUMBLEance, visit Fiona’s fundraising page here:https://www.justgiving.com/fundraising/fiona-harrington3Fearless mum braves Donegal’s rough seas to raise over €23,000 was last modified: November 5th, 2019 by Rachel McLaughlinShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)last_img read more

NCWIT, Compugirls: Building a Diverse Tech Future

first_imgRelated Posts Tags:#events#start audrey watters The NCWIT Summit on Women and IT is being held in Portland, Oregon this week and is providing an opportunity for its members to share resources and strategize on how to inspire girls to choose computing careers and support women to stay in those careers. NCWIT (National Center for Women in Information Technology) is a coalition of over 200 corporations, academic institutions, non profits, and governmental agencies working to address some of these challenges. NCWIT supports efforts within the workforce, in universities, and in K-12 education in order to increase women’s participation in IT – in the classroom, in startups, and in corporations. The Facts: Women in the Tech IndustryThe technology industry is one of the fastest growing industries in the U.S. The U.S. Labor Department estimates that technology job opportunities are predicted to grow by about 22% over the next decade, a faster rate than all other jobs in the professional sector.Recent studies have shown that despite the increase in the number of computing jobs, interest in computer science majors has steadily declined over the past few years. According to NCWIT, this decline is even more significant among women. In 2008, for example, women earned 57% of all bachelor’s degrees, yet they only earned 18% of computer and IT bachelor’s degrees – down from 37% in 1985. And in 2008, women held 57% of all professional occupations in the U.S. workforce but only 25% of all professional IT-related jobs – down from 36% in 1991. Not only does the industry fail to attract new talent, it also loses talent already interested and involved in technology. For example, 56% of technical women leave at the mid-point of their careers, more than double the attrition rate of men. Some of these women start their own tech companies, but many leave the industry altogether.The Future: Compugirls and Social Justice TechnologyAlthough there are certainly steps that the tech industry can take to attract and retain women, it’s important to promote computer careers to young girls long before they are set to choose college majors or careers. According to Kimberly Scott, associate professor at Arizona State University, by the eighth grade girls have fewer positive perceptions of computers than boys. Scott is the executive director of Compugirls, a social justice technology program for girls age 13 to 18 in under-resourced areas of Phoenix and in tribal communities.Scott notes that low-income African-American, Hispanic, and Native American students have less access to technology at home and in their schools than Caucasian families, and that women of color enter computing majors and careers at an even lower rate than white women. Compugirls is designed to encourage girls to be creators, not just consumers of technology. Compugirls is a year-round, two-year program that uses multimedia to enhance girls’ computational thinking and technology skills. Compugirls is designed not simply to advance technology, but to harness technology in service of the girls’ communities. Compugirls operates at two sites: one on the ASU campus and one on the Gila River Indian Community.Girls in the program learn tech skills, including some programming with Scratch and work in the Teen Second Life grid. According to Scott’s research, those involved in the program have a higher sense of self confidence – not just in technology, but in academia and in body image.Compugirls makes technology culturally relevant, giving the girls who participate the tools to become advocates for themselves and for their communities.The program emphasizes mentorship and peer-to-peer collaboration. These support systems are crucial not just for encouraging girls to become interested in technology, but as NCWIT and a recent Kauffman Foundation study have shown, an important part a larger effort on how to support the women to enter the tech industry – as college majors, as tech professionals, and as entrepreneurs. A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai…center_img Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic… 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Marketlast_img read more

Olympics Online: Who Wins The Gold Medal For Best Website?

first_imgThese guides not only explain the various Olympics sports – very helpful for sports like fencing and equestrian, which only enthusiasts follow outside of the Olympics – but they encourage you to give the sports a go yourself.Runners-UpThe Official London 2012 Olympics WebsiteWhile not a media website per se, the London 2012 Olympics website is a good place to get the latest news and photos. It features Facebook integration, including the dreaded frictionless sharing (“Your friends will see the articles you’ve read and the events you’ve celebrated.”). The official site has been active too on its Facebook and Twitter accounts – we’ve noticed athletes re-tweeting the official account a lot. Tags:#design#web We’re well into the second week of the London 2012 Olympics, so which media website is winning with its online coverage? NBC fell at the first hurdle with its TV scheduling, but did the network get back into the race with its website? What about the New York Times, with its muscular web development? Or hometown favorite the BBC, with the crowd behind it – not to mention the wallet of the British taxpayer. In this post we’ll compare the main media outlets and see which ones are medal-worthy.Gold: The New York Times The TelegraphThe British daily has a comprehensive website, including some interesting infographics.USA Today USA Today brings its trademark strengths of storytelling and explanatory graphics to the Olympics, with an informative website. We recommend you check out the interactive section.NBCNBC’s Olympics website was the place to go for American viewers who wanted to watch the Olympics live. Alternatively people could access live coverage online in other, sometimes less legal, ways. Apart from the live video though, NBC’s website is solid but unexciting.ESPNESPN has a nice collection of video commentaries and written opinion pieces, if you can stand the eye-scorchingly bright red background of its Olympics subsite.YahooYahoo’s coverage is fine, but there are better places to get your Olympics news and results. It does though have some useful athlete profiles, along with a sappy “Team Mom” section (featuring interviews of mothers of athletes).ReutersReuters has a standalone website, in addition to partnering with the NYT. Its own website is well designed, but seems devoid of the personality of other media sites.Of course there are many other media websites out there which have good coverage of the Olympics. If we missed your favorite, please add it to the comments!See also: Social Olympics: Does The Gold Medal Go To Facebook, Twitter or Google+? 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Market Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting It’s a relatively simple graph showing when Yang won the race (the last quarter). Below that is a geographical view of previous winners of this event. I was able to click on my country, New Zealand, to see Danyon Loader’s name pop up for 1996. Although I was unable to click on Loader’s name – or Yang’s for that matter – to find out more details about the swimmer.Here’s another example, which is more in-depth. It’s a bubble-based view of the medal table. The host nation’s public broadcaster, the BBC, has been widely praised for its television coverage. There are up to 24 live channels devoted to the Olympics at any one time. As for its website, the coverage is solid – if unspectacular. There is plenty of Olympics news and photos, with a bias towards Team Great Britain (as to be expected with any national publication).One of the more interesting features is the BBC’s Event Guides. Related Posts Hover over a country and you see its medal tally. Click on it and the data underneath the graph changes to show all of that country’s medal results.Silver: The Guardian The New York Times Olympics website is as sleek and good looking as an American track athlete. The site is a compelling combination of facts and figures, news analysis, interactive graphs and multimedia (video and photos). It’s also beautifully laid out, with clear navigation. Not only did the NYT build an Olympics site for itself, it partnered with Reuters to syndicate the data and content to other publications.A highlight of the NYT website is its data-based graphics. Here’s an example from the 400m freestyle swimming race, won by China’s Sun Yang: A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai… Just about anything the Guardian does on the Web is innovative and polished – and its Olympics coverage has been no exception. The NYT seemed slightly more satisfactory to us in terms of breadth and depth of stories, and ability to move around the site, but the Guardian does have some outstanding features. In particular, a “second screen” subsite. The New Zealand team ranked third, by population. That’s something for this author to be proud of.Bronze: BBC It’s a browser website, but it works best on a tablet. The idea is to offer real-time information – news, statistics, photos, tweets and more – on your tablet device while you watch the Olympics on TV. Very handy!Like the NYT, the Guardian makes a good attempt at offering interactive data services. For example, a daily updated Olympic medal table ranked by GDP, population and team size. 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