Piketon farmer’s ingenuity scores him a U.S. Patent

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest One hot summer of dealing with the task of connecting his old 330 John Deere hay baler’s driveshaft to the PTO of his John Deere 6230 was quite enough for 80-year-old Roy Noel.As Noel was working on his rolling-hill farm in Pike County, he came up with a solution for this painstaking chore.“The first year I had that tractor, I could hardly turn the power take off shaft and the driveshaft on that baler is really heavy. It was all I could do to hold it up when I was connecting it,” Noel said. “By the time I tried to hold that driveshaft up, in line, and turn the tractor’s shaft to put it together, 20 minutes would go by.”The second year in the hay fields with those same green and yellow implements, Noel knew that there had to be a better, more productive way to get the job done.“I had a prototype of this tool I designed made at a shop in Waverly,” Noel said, as he showed off his “Y”-shaped, wrench type instrument with a thumb screw on one tip. “I used it all of that summer on my baler, bush hog and mower conditioner and it worked just fine.”Noel knew he had something that could make a difference on many other farms, like it did for his, so he called up a lawyer in Cincinnati. After 3 years, Noel’s ingenuity and hard work was recognized in the form of a U.S. patent. Patent number 9,009,943, to be exact, means Noel is the only one that can manufacture this particular design.“Research was done about this idea of mine all the way back to the 1800’s, and I found out that PTOs on tractors didn’t start until the 1920’s,” Noel said. “So I figured I had something unique, which surprised me because the concept is so simple.”Noel’s inventions give a farmer just enough leverage to turn the tractor’s PTO shaft to get any piece of equipment hooked up safely and much more efficiently, in about 10 seconds.The prototype still sits on Noel’s kitchen table, alongside one of 31 tools that have been manufactured for sale. Right now he is all sold out.This isn’t the first time that Noel, a retired machinist, has come up with an idea on his farm that has made the job more productive. Years ago, he designed a guard on a small bush hog to keep the weeds from wrapping around the shaft, but the idea of patenting that concept never came to mind and he says he wouldn’t mess with another patent now.As for the patent he did get, he doesn’t plan to keep it too much longer.“I’m not sure what it’s worth, but the plan is to sell this patent,” Noel said. “I’m dealing with a company in Arizona that specializes in selling patents like this and they will deal on the price with a company that wants to buy it. They’ll get a small percentage for selling it and I’ll get the rest.”When that day comes, Noel says he doesn’t have any big plans because he is too attached to the farm.While Noel waits for that little piece of paper to come in the mail, he is getting plenty of big items sent to him, including commendations from the Ohio Senate and the Ohio House of Representatives.“Between the patent letter and those two recognitions from Columbus, we have plenty of new frames to hang,” Noel said, as he looked along the walls lined with his prized deer heads. “But I guess we’ll have to move some of these first.”Trophies from a good day in the woods will soon be replaced by trophies from a lifetime of a job well done in the field.last_img read more

Army back in Darjeeling after 2 deaths

first_imgViolence erupted again in the Darjeeling hills on Saturday after two persons were killed, allegedly in firing by police and security forces. The Army was redeployed to control the situation, which turned volatile as pro-Gorkhaland supporters clashed with the police in Darjeeling town and adjoining areas. Tension gripped the hills after the death of Tashi Bhutia, a Gorkha National Liberation Front supporter, at Sonada. GNLF spokespers- on Neeraj Zimba said Bhutia was shot dead by security forces on Friday night. The police, however, said they did not have any report of firing. “We don’t have any report of police firing as of now. We are looking into the incident. We can give you details later,” a police officer said. Clashes erupted as the procession carrying Bhutia’s body turned violent and protesters attacked a police outpost at Sonada. A pitched battle ensued between the protesters and police. The protesters also set ablaze the Sonada station of the heritage Darjeeling Himalayan Railway. The violence soon spread to Darjeeling town with clashes at Chowk Bazar. Police resorted to tear gas shelling to disperse the mob, which allegedly tried to attack the office of Deputy Superintendent of Police. A second youth later succumbed to bullet injuries sustained during the violence. He is yet to be identified but is thought to be a resident of Singhamari. Clashes were also reported from Kalimpong where protesters set on fire property of the State Forest Department.Two columns of the Army, one at Sonada and the other in Darjeeling town, were deployed to control the situation. “One accident has happened at Sonada. This is because they attacked the police.. We will have to look into who is responsible,” Chief Minister Mamata Banerjee said at the State Secretariat. Urging pro-Gorkhaland supporters to shun violence, Ms. Banerjee said she was ready to hold meetings with political parties in the hills in the next 10-15 days. “I am asking the administration and the people to exercise restraint,” she said.She asked protesters to allow the government to send food and other supplies to the hills.last_img read more

‘Glitches are a part of big events’

first_imgArrival of athletes from competing countries may have been disrupted amid concerns about security and organisational problems, but Indian triple jumper Renjith Maheshwary feels glitches are a part and parcel of multi- discipline events like Commonwealth Games, Asian Games and Olympics. Having represented India at the 2006 Asian Games and the 2008 Beijing Olympics, Maheshwary believes no major sporting event can be 100 per cent organised and according to plan.”I do agree that we shouldn’t have waited till the eleventh hour to complete the preparations, but minor hiccups are synonymous with mega sporting events.Although media reported the dilemma among competing countries regarding the safety and preparedness of our country, I was always confident that the Games would take place,” he told Mail Today .”The whole process of preparing the city for the mega event might have been slow, but trust me, the facilities are of international standards and the Games will be completed successfully.”Maheshwary said the athletes in the national camp in Patiala are focussed on the target. “We were never under the delusion that the Games would be cancelled. So we sweated it out at the camp.Being a part of the host country, we have to ensure that we put up a commendable performance. As a result, we concentrated on making use of the training facilities at Patiala rather than losing focus and concentrating on the turmoil in Delhi,” he said.”Also, the fact that we had a feel of the Jawaharlal Nehru Stadium – which is world- class to say the least – during the Asian All- Star Athletics Meet in July, further strengthened our belief that the Games would take place.” Many feel that the facilities at the National Institute of Sports ( NIS) are the best in the country.advertisementMaheshwary also feels that as sportspersons from different disciplines got to spend quality time together augurs well for India.”The authorities also ensured that we got to train according to our competition timings and never complained. For example, I have my event in the evening at the Games, so I used to train once in the morning and once at 7 pm in the evening. Although the tracks are generally closed at that time, they used to happily accommodate me,” he said.”But above everything else, the fact that we got to spend quality time with athletes from different disciplines like boxing, wrestling and women’s hockey team, among others, also proved to be fruitful. We got to know each other really well.” Maheshwary said interacting with the likes of boxer Vijender Kumar inspired him.”I personally interacted with Vijender and he shared his experience of competing at the various ‘A’ class competitions like the Beijing Olympics and World Championships last year.Just hearing those episodes was inspirational.” Maheshwary last represented India in the VTB Bank Continental Cup in Split, Croatia, as part of preparations. Although he finished seventh, he isn’t disheartened.”My major intention behind participating in this event was to compete with the likes of Britain’s Phillips Idowu and not (necessarily) to win the gold,” he stressed.”Although he is not participating in the Games, initially I had considered him to be my toughest competitor.But Idowu’s withdrawal doesn’t mean that it will be an easy walk in the park for me. I expect tough competition from the African and remaining British jumpers.” Maheshwary is aiming for the gold. “I hope to win nothing but the gold medal,” he said.Although people feel that the pullout of the foreign athletes has come as a dampener, he feels they have lost an opportunity to get a taste of the Indian culture.”Even though it is their personal decision to pull out, it won’t affect the credibility of the Games. Every mega event has a few stars pulling out if not for security reasons then due to injury. So this isn’t something new,” he felt.”I think they missed out on an opportunity to come and get a feel of our culture, warmth and hospitality.”last_img read more