Mastercare Begins Trophy Defence in Asaba

first_imgThe second edition of the Delta State Principal’s Cup football competition for all secondary schools officially starts today in Asaba.The defending Champions, Mastercare International School Asaba will engage Comprehensive Secondary School, Ogwashi-Uku , in the kick off tie of what has been tagged Season 2 of the competition.All the local governments in the state will be represented in the tournament that will start with the zonal preliminaries before getting into the final knock out stage. The sponsors, Zenith Bank, will have Deputy Managing Director, Ebenezer Onyeagwu, representing the Group Managing Director, Peter Amangbo, while Delta State Governor, Ifeanyi Okowa, who has this programme on his heart, will be represented by the Commissioner for Basic and Secondary Education, Chiedu Ebie, at the opening ceremony.Okowa, it would be recalled at the closing ceremony of the first edition announced a scholarship award of N200,000 each for the individual winners throughout their secondary school education.Today’s kick-off will however be handled by Onyeagwu by 12noon at the St. Patrick’s Secondary School in Asaba to officially declare the tournament open.It was further learnt that the Local Organising Committee (LOC) for the tournament and the officials of the state government have been working round the clock to ensure a smooth take off of the developmental competition.“We are getting ready to stage a good event from all areas because our youths must be engaged and we have to boost their future through their talents,” Ebie said.Zenith Bank GMD, Amangbo, at the weekend promised that the Season 2 of the tournament would be more glamorous for the participants.“The enthusiasm of the players in the last edition was impressive and we also had good feedback about the skills exhibited in various centres during the competition and that is why we have to improve with every edition,” Amangbo said.Over 1,200 private secondary schools and 446 public government secondary schools took part in the maiden edition which had Mastercare International Secondary School emerging tops after beating Iderghe Secondary School 2-1 in the final.Share this:FacebookRedditTwitterPrintPinterestEmailWhatsAppSkypeLinkedInTumblrPocketTelegramlast_img read more

Valencia star good to go

first_imgValencia High’s Foothill League foes might have hoped to avoid Taryn Robertson, the league’s 2004 girls’ volleyball Player of the Year, who was questionable for Tuesday’s match against Hart because of a wrist injury. No such luck. Robertson, a UC Irvine-bound setter who pulled a ligament in her right wrist about a month ago, opted to play against the Indians, and Valencia remained undefeated in league. Robertson continued playing after suffering the injury, but the wrist was reevaluated last week, and the Vikings weren’t sure until Tuesday whether she would play this week. Robertson, her wrist taped, played in three of four games against Hart. She sat out the match’s second game, which Hart won 25-9, the first league game Valencia (14-2 overall) had lost this year. Robertson returned for the decisive game and she finished with 29 assists. AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREWalnut’s Malik Khouzam voted Southern California Boys Athlete of the Week Another injury: Hart’s Sara Ferrier suffered a sprained thumb in last week’s loss to Canyon. She sat out Thursday’s match against Burbank. Recruiting buzz: Robertson committed to UC Irvine before the season started, and recruiters are targeting many of her Valencia teammates. Middle blocker Asha Kakonde is considering Wyoming, and Cal State Bakersfield is a leading choice for opposite hitter Nicole Piva. Outside hitter Lauren Wells has heard from a few schools and is keeping her options open. Danielle Maricle also is being recruited, as a softball player, and has visited Villanova, Hawaii and North Carolina. She said she would like to continue playing volleyball but realizes it would take away from her softball training. “Most of them say it’s too hard,” said Maricle, who has been asked to concentrate on softball by the schools recruiting her. “If they’re paying for me to be there, I figure I owe it to them to do my best to be ready. I’ll need to focus on softball.” Honest answer: Maricle sounded embarrassed when explaining how she started playing volleyball, realizing hers is not the typical path on a team loaded with longtime club players. “I went to one of the boys’ games and saw they had cute guys,” she said. Figuring an easy way to hang out with the guys would be to play their sport, Maricle started playing volleyball as a sophomore. She contributed 11 kills in Tuesday’s victory over Hart. Busy week: Valencia played a makeup match Wednesday against Canyon, the first of three games on successive days. The Vikings are home today against Burroughs of Burbank. In the rankings: Area teams are well represented in the Southern Section rankings. Valencia is No. 5 in Div. I-AA, Saugus is No. 7 and Hart No. 10 in I-A, and Santa Clarita Christian is No. 8 in V-AA. Heather Gripp, (818) 713-3607 heather.gripp@dailynews.com 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more

Investing in the Eastern Cape

first_imgThe Eastern Cape offers major cities, airports, ports as well as a dynamic manufacturing sector which includes the southern African bases of some of the world’s major companies.The Eastern Cape offers modern infrastructure for import and export, such as the deep-water Port of Ngqura near Port Elizabeth. (Image: Brand South Africa)John YoungThe Eastern Cape is on the south-eastern coast of Africa, a location that is proving to be an international asset. The allocation of two of South Africa’s five industrial development zones (IDZs) to the province is confirmation of the potential that is offered by the shipping traffic that operates between Europe and Asia and the Far East.Eastern Cape overviewEastern Cape governmentEastern Cape Development CorporationThe province is well served logistically, with two major airports in Port Elizabeth and East London, and several facilities serving smaller towns such as Mthatha and Bhisho. In addition, many farms and private game reserves have airstrips.The construction of the large new port at Ngqura, within the Coega IDZ, brings to three the number of effective ports operating in the Eastern Cape.The province’s road network is defined by the west-east axis of the coastal N2, with three other national routes (N9, N10 and N6) providing north-south routes through the region.The reopening of the Mthatha-East London line is a step along the path of revitalising the province’s rail network, a vital part of any rural upliftment plan.Varied topographical and climatic conditions contribute to a diverse agricultural offering that includes wool, mohair, dairy and forestry, and make for a superb tourist destination.The Eastern Cape is home to four of South Africa’s biggest automotive companies and several of the largest concerns in the automotive components and support sectors. The catalytic convertor industry is a world leader.Transformative projectsProjects that are due to come on stream at the Coega IDZ have the potential to transform the provincial economy. In the medium-term, Coega is the preferred site of a new oil refinery. Project Mthombo, set to be completed in 2017 according to the plan, would cost about R77-billion and create 18 000 jobs in the operational phase.The plan to locate a new manganese processing plant at Coega will similarly inject massive amounts of capital into the province, and have a sustained downstream effect on related industries and suppliers. Investment at the Port of Ngqura, part of the Coega IDZ, is scheduled to reach R4-billion in the period 2011-2016.Port Elizabeth’s port has for many years been the site of a manganese-exporting facility. The idea is to move that to Ngqura, together with the existing liquid-bulk terminal.Once these facilities are located away from the Port of Port Elizabeth, large parts of the harbour will be available for redevelopment for retail and leisure. This has been a plan for some time, part of a broader plan to revitalise the harbour and neighbouring beachfront.The Nelson Mandela Bay Metropolitan Municipality, through its Mandela Bay Development Agency (MBDA), has plans to spend R40-million on beachfront development. The MBDA has spent R250-million on upgrading Govan Mbeki Avenue and other parts of the inner city. It has also supported 67 tourism projects.The province’s automotive producers export just more than half of the motor vehicles produced in South Africa. The companies that operate in the Eastern Cape are Mercedes-Benz SA (East London), Volkswagen (Uitenhage), and General Motors South Africa and Ford, both in Port Elizabeth. The Ford plant assembles engines.All of these companies have invested heavily in increased production in recent years. These operations support many subsidiary industries such as pressed steel, plastics, and leather for car seats. Port Elizabeth has become a world leader in the production of catalytic converters.The Nelson Mandela Bay Logistics Park (NMBLP) serves as an automotive cluster, supplying logistical support and economies of scale for companies servicing the motor industry in Port Elizabeth and Uitenhage. National government has allocated R30- million to this project in its medium-term expenditure framework.The East London Industrial Development Zone has a similar initiative which is attracting automotive-supply companies.The province’s exports have been doing well in recent times, driven by a large increase in vehicle sales. Volkswagen Group South Africa won the Exporter of the Year in 2011, awarded by the Nelson Mandela Bay Business Chamber.Howden Donkin, a company making fans, blowers and accessories, won the award for exporting by smaller businesses. Morgan Cargo was acknowledged for its excellent service to exporters.Other major manufacturing sectors in the province are food and beverages (Cadbury, Nestle, SAB, Clover, Dairybelle) and pharmaceutical (Aspen).Key factsThe Eastern Cape extends over 169 580 square kilometres, representing 13.9% of South Africa’s land mass.The province has more livestock than any other province, with a fifth of the country’s cattle, a quarter of its sheep and nearly half its goats. Mohair is a speciality of the Karoo region.The province’s population of 6.9 million makes it the country’s third-most populous province, with about 15% of the national population.TourismTourism is a major growth industry. Addo Elephant National Park is the largest of the province’s four national parks and there are more than a dozen provincial parks and a growing number of private game farms, lodges and reserves.The province’s beaches and waves are very popular, with adventure tourism luring in tourists wanting to go on 4×4 trails, jump off bridges or fly microlight aircraft.Alternative energiesThe Eastern Cape receives a lot of sunlight and it has areas along its coastline that can easily transfer wind into energy. These and other options in the alternative energy field, including biofuels, are being actively investigated with some sizable investments already having been made.InvestmentProvincial government expenditure in the Eastern Cape was 60.5% higher in March 2011 than it was in March 2010. This is according to the Eastern Cape Barometer, an economic tracking programme that is a joint initiative of Sake24 and BoE Private Clients.The biggest growth subsectors were agriculture, transport and manufacturing but it was the state spending that took the province’s Barometer growth index to its highest- ever point – 19%.According to the provincial Department of Economic Development and Environmental Affairs, total gross domestic fixed investment in the Eastern Cape has been dominated by the machinery/other equipment and building and construction sectors over the last 13 years. The machinery/other equipment sector contributed 44% of fixed investment in the period 1995-2008, with building and construction averaging 41% in the same period.Mega-projects such as the refinery and the manganese plant together with the huge amounts of money committed by motor manufacturers and suppliers are signs of the growing confidence in the Eastern Cape as an investment destination.Other significant investments made into the region in the course of 2009 and 2010 were:A diamond-beneficiation project in the East London Industrial Development Zone. This will help South Africa to beneficiate more of its own resources and create opportunities for skilled employment.The Sunningdale Dairy being established in the ELIDZ.The construction of the SAS Radisson Port Elizabeth (Radisson Blu Hotel), an investment of R320-million and a significant addition to the tourism offering of the region.A facility in the ELIDZ intended to produce 300 000 flat-panel solar-water heaters, as well as more affordable vacuum-based systems per year. The Eastern Cape Development Corporation (ECDC) holds 15% equity in a firm of mostly Taiwanese investors and is putting R20-million of the R33-million capital into the start-up. Some 250 direct and indirect jobs will be created.The opening of the R1.5-billion Hemingways Mall in East London. Put together by the Billion Group, at 210 000 square metres, it is the biggest shopping centre in the Eastern Cape.The investment in two call centres in the Coega IDZ.Several wind-farm projects are either being constructed or are under consideration. Belgian company Electrawinds has started installing 25 wind turbines at Coega Industrial Development Zone while Rainmaker Energy, an independent power producer (IPP), is planning two new wind-power projects in the Eastern Cape, the Dorper project and the AB’s project. Together, the two projects will generate 610 megawatts.Other municipalitiesAlfred Nzo District MunicipalityTowns: Matatiele, Mount Frere, Mount AyliffThe smallest district is located in the mountainous north-east, with hiking trails being an attraction for tourists. Subsistence agriculture and forestry are the major economic activities.Cacadu District MunicipalityTowns: Graaff-Reinet, Cradock, Humansdorp, Jeffreys Bay, GrahamstownThe western part of the province contains the biggest municipality and is one of the biggest contributors to provincial GDP. Large commercial farms in the Karoo produce quality meat, wool and mohair, while the coastal belt has dairy farming and some forestry. The Kouga Valley is a big deciduous fruit producer, while the area around Kirkwood/Addo is known for its citrus.Cacadu has three of the region’s national parks (Camdeboo, Tsitsikamma and Addo Elephant Park) and several private game farms. Grahamstown is the venue of the National Arts Festival, while Jeffreys Bay is among the top surfing spots in the world.Chris Hani District MunicipalityTowns: Middelburg, Molteno, Dordrecht, Queenstown, Lady Frere, ElliotSheep farming is an important part of the economy. Some coal is found in the north and tourist activities include fly-fishing. The Nola factory in Molteno manufactures Ouma rusks. The Grootfontein Agricultural College and Research Station is in Middelburg, and the Marlow Agricultural College is near Cradock.OR Tambo District MunicipalityTowns: Mthatha, Coffee Bay, Port St Johns, Qumbu, Bizana, FlagstaffOR Tambo District Municipality encompasses some of the province’s least-developed areas and contains one of South Africa’s most important ecological areas, the Pondoland Centre of Plant Endemism. Mining is already pursued in some areas, but plans to allow titanium mining on seaside dunes are being contested.There is great potential for tourism. A Wild Coast Spatial Development Initiative exists to plot further development. Magwa Tea Estate and forestry concerns are among the biggest employers.Joe Gqabi District MunicipalityTowns: Aliwal North, Burgersdorp, Lady Grey, Rhodes, Barkly East, UgieCattle and sheep farming make up 80% of land use, while commercial forestry is a big contributor to employment. The hot springs at Aliwal North and skiing at Tiffendell are two major tourist attractions.This is an edited version of an article published by Frontier Market Network. Republished here with kind permission. Copyright © Frontier Market Intelligence Ltd. All rights reservedReviewed: September 2013last_img read more

Tips for finding workable farm financial solutions

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Evan HahnA conversation with…Evan Hahn, Vice President of Credit, Farm Credit Mid-AmericaOCJ: There is growing concern for some farms with regard to securing enough loan funding to be able to plant a crop in 2016. What broad factors have contributed to this situation for some farms?Evan: With the end of the commodity super-cycle, farmers are now faced with commodity prices less than half of what they were just two years ago. At the same time, inputs, equipment and land rents have not dropped as quickly as commodity prices. This has heightened the need for farmers to maintain an adequate working capital position to help them weather periods of adverse economic activity.Farmers will need to proactively assess their financial position and determine if changes need to be made to their business model. If changes are necessary, I would encourage them to work with their lender to look at options and decide which ones may have the most beneficial impact for meeting both the short and long term goals of the farm.OCJ: What is your take on the farm lending situation for 2016 and beyond?Evan: This will be a challenging year for many farmers. Tighter margins will require farmers to closely examine each line item expense as well as capital needs, marketing and income strategies. This may well be the norm for a year or more, as producers adjust to lower prices and margins. The producers who are able to adjust quickly and in meaningful ways will be in a better position to handle continued adversity.Many younger or beginning farmers have not experienced a period of time with tighter margins. At Farm Credit Mid-America, we have a program for young, beginning farmers to obtain credit, as we understand the challenges they face. The program focuses on providing young farmers with tools to help them improve management skills, financial training, business plans and peer networking. All of these learning tools are available to customers who participate in the program.OCJ: What types of farm situations pose the highest risk of not being able to secure enough credit?Evan: Farms without sufficient working capital will find themselves in a difficult spot, and they may find it necessary to operate entirely on borrowed funds. While that isn’t necessarily a bad decision, it does limit options for farmers as they do not have the cash to make operational decisions throughout the production year.Other situations that cause concern are with those who cannot adjust their expenses or fixed costs quickly enough to avoid multiple years of true cash losses. While the recent past has resulted in tremendous earnings potential, we are now seeing farms that are experiencing significant year-over-year losses.OCJ: What on-farm factors are important to you as a lender in formulating credit allocation decisions?Evan: Management ability is an intangible that is always difficult to discern. However, management capabilities on the farm are crucial during times of economic stress. The ability of a farm manager to effectively incorporate risk mitigation strategies such as marketing plans, crop insurance, and the ability and willingness to adjust to the changing economic environment is vital to the success of the farm. This all starts with a deep understanding of their financial position, their risk appetite and the discipline to put together and follow a detailed plan to weather the current ag economic conditions.OCJ: In these times of tight margins, what short-term advice do you offer the farmers you work with?Evan: Be proactive in talking with your lender, don’t wait until the situation is in dire shape before having that conversation. Often, by having that conversation early in the process, there are multiple solutions that can be identified to provide relief to the farm. As time goes on and circumstances deteriorate, the options available may be fewer and more difficult to accept.Step back and objectively scrutinize all aspects of your farm operation and determine capital and expenses that are absolutely necessary, those that are beneficial, and those that are not vitally important to the ongoing success of the farm.OCJ: How does crop insurance fit into the mix?Evan: Crop insurance should be a key risk mitigation strategy for every grain farmer. With tighter margins and lower commodity prices, I would highly encourage producers to seek out a qualified crop insurance agent that can tailor a policy to their needs. This is another tool available to farmers to help them mitigate risk and formulate their marketing plan.OCJ: What are sound long-term strategies farms should employ for weathering tough financial storms?Evan: Know your break-even cost of production and have a marketing plan developed that will enable you to lock in a profit. If you find that your break-even is below the current commodity price, analyze ways that you can improve your margins by cutting expenses, improving production or marketing more effectively.Also, build and maintain a level of working capital that will enable you to weather periodic downturns in the ag economy. A minimum level of working capital we would expect to see is 20% of your gross farm income. During times of adversity, higher levels of working capital will provide a farm operation with more options.OCJ: Relationships are important in securing credit. What steps should farmers take to develop better relationships with their lenders?Evan: Be proactive in knowing and understanding where you stand with your lender. Find out what key financial ratios are important to them and update them annually at a minimum.Additionally, set goals for your operation and share them with your lender. Knowing where you want to be three, five, or 10 years down the road will help your lender understand your operation and can then provide feedback in ways to help you achieve your goals.OCJ: What is the toughest part of your job in all of this? I would guess tough lending decisions are no fun for anyone involved.Evan: Working with customers during times of stress can be challenging. It is important to recognize that farming is not only their livelihood, but for many, it is a way of life.  Treating customers with respect and being open, honest, transparent and realistic about issues is important. The lender cannot be all things to all customers at all times, but by being proactive, working together and treating each other with integrity we can oftentimes find workable solutions for both the farm and Farm Credit Mid-America.  The rewarding part of the job is finding ways that we can work with our customers.last_img read more

China Lifts Ban on US Poultry Imports

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest By Todd NeeleyDTN Staff ReporterOMAHA (DTN) — Poultry exports from the United States to China will resume after the Chinese government lifted a four-year ban on Thursday, as the nation struggles to meet protein demands in light of the African swine fever outbreak.The lifting of the ban is effective immediately. China imposed the ban in 2015, responding to avian influenza outbreaks in the U.S.; the U.S. has been free of avian influenza since 2017.The news was welcome relief for U.S. poultry producers. The National Chicken Council, National Turkey Federation and the USA Poultry and Egg Export Council released a joint statement following the announcement.“Lifting the ban has been a top priority of the U.S. poultry industry for the past four years,” the groups said. “We thank President Trump, Agriculture Secretary (Sonny) Perdue, U.S. Trade Representative (Robert) Lighthizer, Treasury Secretary (Steve) Mnuchin, congressional leaders and their staffs, all of whom have worked tirelessly to reach an agreement with China and ensure the poultry industry has access to this market.”At its peak, annual poultry exports from the U.S. to China was a $71 million market for turkey and a $722 million market for chicken. The groups said renewed access to the Chinese market could result in $1 billion annually for “chicken paws alone.”In addition, they said there could be another $1 billion of potential exports of other chicken products, including leg and breast meat. Turkey exports could generate another $100 million in sales and poultry breeding stock at least $60 million more.“America’s poultry producers are committed to raising high-quality, nutritious products, and we are extremely pleased that we will once again have the opportunity to share these products with Chinese consumers,” the groups said.Lighthizer and Perdue issued statements regarding China’s decision.“The United States welcomes China’s decision to finally lift its unwarranted ban on U.S. poultry and poultry products,” Lighthizer said. “This is great news for both America’s farmers and China’s consumers. China is an important export market for America’s poultry farmers and we estimate they will now be able to export more than $1 billion worth of poultry and poultry products each year to China. Reopening China to U.S. poultry will create new export opportunities for our poultry farmers and support thousands of workers employed by the U.S. poultry industry.”Perdue said, “After being shut out of the market for years, U.S. poultry producers and exporters welcome the reopening of China’s market to their products. America’s producers are the most productive in the world and it is critical they be able to sell their bounty to consumers in other parts of the globe. We will continue our work to expand market access in important markets like China as well as other countries, to support our producers and U.S. jobs.”The U.S. exported more than $500 million worth of poultry products to China in 2013, prior to the 2014 avian influenza outbreak.The U.S. is the world’s second-largest poultry exporter, with global exports of poultry meat and products of $4.3 billion last year.Todd Neeley can be reached at todd.neeley@dtn.comFollow him on Twitter @toddneeleyDTN(SK/CZ)© Copyright 2019 DTN/The Progressive Farmer. All rights reserved.last_img read more

Why Are Dead People Liking Stuff On Facebook?

first_imgI started tracking these unlikely likes, taking screenshots and following up with IMs to my friends. I asked Nicolala if she had indeed “liked” Walmart, and her answer was succinct: Brendan sent me this info in response to a request I had made on Facebook to my friends. Not long ago I asked people to send me screenshots of weird or suspicious behavior. I did this after noticing some bizarre things happening on Facebook —such as friends of mine showing up as “liking” things that I know they don’t like, such as liberals “liking” Mitt Romney and a guy with no car who “liked” Subaru.When I contacted these people they swore they had never liked these brands, and they had no idea that this stuff was going out under their names.So what is going on?The Mystery Of The Unintended LikesFull disclosure: I’m an active Facebook user, and I really enjoy it. I use Facebook to stay in touch with my friends and family who are scattered across the country and world. I also use Facebook to promote the arts magazine I publish, Sensitive Skin.The first sign I saw that something was not quite right was that after I’d spent a lot of time getting people to “like” the Sensitive Skin page, fewer and fewer people were seeing my posts.More people had been seeing my posts six months earlier, last winter, when I only had 800 likes, than this past summer, when I had more than 2,000.Then I heard about Facebook’s latest idea, getting users to pay to “promote” our own posts, so that more people would see them.Many people find promoted posts egregious, and the blowback has been well documented. A site called Dangerous Minds called promoted posts “the biggest bait and switch in history.” Mark Cuban complained in an article on The Huffington Post and made the same case here on ReadWrite.Nevertheless, in August I decided to give Sponsored Posts a try to promote Sensitive Skin. That’s when the weirdness began.Strange Results From Sponsored PostsMy number of post views did indeed go up, according the statistics provided to me by Facebook. But these likes didn’t seem like “quality” views or likes. I was getting likes from folks in South America, the Middle East and Eastern Europe. Comments were posted not only in languages I couldn’t understand, but in alphabets I didn’t recognize.This was suboptimal — not to mention extremely weird — for a literary magazine written in English.Then I started noticing something else. “Sponsored Posts” were popping up near the top of my newsfeed, and some of them made no sense. A number of my liberal friends supposedly had “liked” Mitt Romney, for instance. And my friend Nicolala, a high school English teacher from San Francisco, had “liked” WalMart. Then he said that he went to his profile and “unliked” Subaru. I asked, shocked, wait, you mean Subaru actually went and “liked” themselves for you, without your knowledge? Tags:#Facebook#social media Facebook is Becoming Less Personal and More Pro… Last month, while wasting a few moments on Facebook, my pal Brendan O’Malley was surprised to see that his old friend Alex Gomez had “liked” Discover. This was surprising not only because Alex hated mega-corporations but even more so because Alex had passed away six months earlier.The Facebook “like” is dated Nov. 1, which is strange since Alex “passed [away] around March 26 or March 27,” O’Malley told me. Worse, O’Malley says the like was “quite offensive” since his friend “hated corporate bullshit.”Here’s a screenshot: The Plot ThickensOK, that’s pretty messed up, I thought. I put out a notice on my Timeline, asking my friends if they’d seen any unusual behavior regarding “likes” and ads.The response was overwhelming.Patti Walsh, a teacher who lives in Minnesota, was not pleased to see she’d inadvertantly liked a household disinfectant, since she had never “liked” this brand. “It’s counterfeit! I’m vegetarian and it’s actually offensive!” I See Dead People … Liking ThingsBut at least those people were alive when they fake-liked something.Emma Kumakura, a game designer in Palo Alto, Calif., was outraged to see her friend Alice Mizer Stewart, who had passed away in March, shilling for a tea company. Bart was doubtful that his friend, a committed anarchist (hey, it’s Holland) had actually liked a bunch of corporate brands. Related Posts Guide to Performing Bulk Email Verification Emma took a look at Alice’s profile and it appears that she did, in fact, like The Republic of Tea. Nevertheless it’s kind of disturbing to have people liking brands from beyond the grave.Moreover, Emma saw that she herself supposedly had “liked” Budweiser. But Emma doesn’t drink and hates beer.Facebook’s ExplanationA Facebook spokesman says the “likes” from dead people can happen if an account doesn’t get “memorialized” (meaning someone informs Facebook that the account-holder has died). If nobody tells Facebook that the account-holder is dead, Facebook just keeps operating on the assumption the person is alive.In that case, someone’s “likes” from months and months ago can still keep surfacing in the news feeds of their friends, since Facebook recycles “likes” long after they first occur. Who knew?Thing is, according to my pal Brendan O’Malley, there’s no way that his late friend Alex, who “hated corporate bullshit,” would have “liked” Discover.And what about all these other “likes” from living people, the ones where someone is credited with “liking” something and they swear they didn’t do it?The Facebook spokesman says it’s possible those people “liked” something by accident, by inadvertently pressing a button, perhaps on the mobile app. In response to the specific example of Nicolala liking Walmart, Facebook insists it really did happen: “We show that the Like happened on 10/01 at 6:46 p.m.,” the spokesman says.Fair enough. But these accidents seem to be happening a lot. Are there really that many people accidentally claiming to like stuff that they actually don’t like at all?It’s hard to imagine that Facebook would start “liking” stuff on people’s behalf without their knowledge or consent. Even for Mark Zuckerberg, the guy who once said of his members, “They trust me — dumb fucks,” this would be a stretch.But are the brands themselves doing it? Or are third-party services selling fake “likes” to brands? Supposedly Facebook has been trying to crack down on fake likes. Nevertheless they seem to keep popping up.This might be funny except that it’s also kind of disturbing. I mean, isn’t the enormous market valuation of Facebook predicated on its vast store of information about users, and its ability to use that information to precisely target ads?If Facebook can’t get this under control, what does that say about the value of its data? The persistence of these fake likes is an unnerving thing for Facebook users and investors alike.center_img I asked E.V. if he’d pressed the “like” button for Subaru, and he replied: “No, I did not press like. Maddening. I look at Facebook less and less because it lies more and more.” Bart’s anarchist friend even liked Shell Oil! Now that’s a bit unusual. I found it odd that my friend E.V. Grieve, who writes an anti-gentrification blog about New York’s East Village, would “like” Subaru. bernard meisler “I did not `like’ San Pellegrino. This stuff is making me want to get off the FB.”  The Dos and Don’ts of Brand Awareness Videos Ruby Ray, a photographer from San Francisco, and Bart Plantenga, a radio host from Amsterdam, were also perturbed.  In response to my inquiry, Martin Sarna, a graphic designer from New York City, started checking around among his friends. He too came up with a number of aberrant ads involving the movie “Life of Pi,” San Pellegrino water and McDonald’s.He annotated the screen grabs with comments from his friends and sent them to me: A Comprehensive Guide to a Content Auditlast_img

Gimbal Reviews: Gudsen’s New Moza & a CAME-7800 Update

first_imgThe gimbal market gets more crowded with the new Gudsen Moza and a CAME-7800 update. Get the scoop with these Johnny Wu gimbal reviews.The gimbal market is crowded with options, and one of them, the CAME-7800, recently received an update. Meanwhile, Gudsen just introduced the Moza. Both are fairly inexpensive options. The CAME-7800 comes in at $1380 for the full bundle, and the Moza is releasing at around $2245. To give you an overview of each gimbal, we’ve rounded up a group of videos by Johnny Wu from MDI.Here’s Wu going over the CAME-7800.Next, Wu goes a bit more in-depth and shows you how to calibrate the CAME-7800.In this video, Wu shows us how easy it is to switch out cameras on the CAME-7800.Let’s take a look at the Moza Gimbal.Finally, Johnny runs both gimbals side by side.Thinking about adding either of these gimbals to your gear? Let’s talk about it in the comments below.last_img read more