Half-time: Fulham 0 Cardiff City 1

first_imgPoor defending from Fulham saw them go a goal down four minutes before the break.Despite having the better of the chances in the first half, the Whites were caught out when Aron Gunnarsson escaped the attentions of Richard Stearman and, with the outside of his right boot, clipped in a cross for Lex Immers, who was left totally unmarked to head in.Cardiff almost doubled their lead immediately afterwards as Sean Morrison’s header came back off the post.Fulham had had the better of the first half chances prior to the goal, with Emerson Hyndman and Ross McCormack both denied by Cardiff keeper David Marshall.Slavisa Jokanovic’s side, chasing a third league win in seven days, looked bright going forward and Moussa Dembele skied an early shot from the edge of the box.Cardiff, who need the points to keep in touching distance of the play-off places, responded with headers from Gunnarsson and Bruno Ecuele-Manga, which did not unduly threaten the home goal.Hyndman, who replaced the injured Tom Cairney in the starting line-up, showed the energy he can bring to the side when he intercepted a pass on the halfway line, strode forward 40 yards and then getting a shot away which Marshall palmed behind.Marshall was also equal to McCormack’s curling free-kick, but Fulham were left to rue lapses of concentration at the back when Cardiff went in front.Fulham: Bettinelli; Stearman, Madl, Amorebieta, Garbutt; Tunnicliffe, Parker, Ince, Hyndman; McCormack, Dembele.Subs: Lonergan, Fredericks, Burn, Baird, Christensen, Woodrow, Smith.Cardiff: Marshall; Peltier, Morrison; Ecuele-Manga, Malone; Noone, Gunnarsson, Ralls, Whittingham; Lawrence, Immers. Subs: Moore, Fabio, Connolly, Dikgacoi, O’Keefe, Zohore, Saadi.Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more

Created Designs for Good Health

first_imgScience keeps finding that good health is built into the Master Plan.The Outdoors Is Our EnvironmentSpending at least 120 minutes a week in nature is associated with good health and wellbeing (Nature Scientific Reports). Civilization has been a long process of insulating us from the outdoors. Much of it is for good reason, understandably (during blizzards and heat waves, for instance), but on good days, why bury your face in a computer screen or smartphone? Researchers monitored the well-being of almost 20,000 participants in the UK and found a peak value of about 2-3 hours per week of outdoor exposure was a significant contributing factor:Creation Safaris and other outdoor ministries help people escape to reality.Weekly contact was categorised using 60 min blocks. Analyses controlled for residential greenspace and other neighbourhood and individual factors. Compared to no nature contact last week, the likelihood of reporting good health or high well-being became significantly greater with contact ≥120 mins…. Positive associations peaked between 200–300 mins per week with no further gain. The pattern was consistent across key groups including older adults and those with long-term health issues. It did not matter how 120 mins of contact a week was achieved (e.g. one long vs. several shorter visits/week). Prospective longitudinal and intervention studies are a critical next step in developing possible weekly nature exposure guidelines comparable to those for physical activity.Our bodies are well designed for interaction with the environment. It’s a shame to deprive them of what they were made for. At The Conversation, lead author Matthew White stresses that the benefits are free to all. “Access to most parks and green spaces is free, so even the poorest, and often the least healthy, members of communities have equal access for their health and well-being, he says. “We hope that evidence such as ours will help keep them that way.”Sleep Is Vital to Our Mental HealthSleep increases chromosome dynamics to enable reduction of accumulating DNA damage in single neurons (Zada et al, Nature Communications). This technical paper answers a simple question: Why do we need to sleep? Everyone has probably wondered about that. It’s not just because of the dark at night, because many work late shifts. No, the answer is much more interesting and important: brain activity in waking hours puts a lot of strain on our neurons, and the sleep shift gives the repair crews time to work. Mourrain and Wang explain in a commentary on this paper in Current Biology:While most of our body cells are renewed during the course of our lives, we die with much of the neuronal cells we are born with. Thus, in contrast to a skin, blood or liver cells, which live from days to months, a neuron may need to preserve its integrity while maintaining its capacity to connect to other neurons in an ever-changing environment across decades. While it is unclear how neuronal tissues achieve such a feat, a recurring period of our lives may be critical for the survival and maintenance of our brain cells, including their genome — sleep. A recent study from Zada et al. shows at the single cell level that sleep increases chromosome dynamics in neuronal nuclei to repair DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) accumulated in the genome during wake.Double-stranded breaks are among the most dangerous of DNA injuries. They can lead to cell death or cancer. Complex molecular machines have to grab both loose ends and stitch them back together. The scientists found that genes for DSB repair proteins are up-regulated during sleep. As you lie down in sleep, think about those teams going to work to save your brain!Lack of sleep takes a severe toll on the body and mind. Another study reported by Medical Xpress showed that sleep-deprived firefighters risk exhaustion and mental health problems. About half of firefighters are affected, the study says; most fire stations require 24-hour shifts, sometimes for days in a row, and alarms can go off at any time. Researchers in Australia “suggest that reducing sleep and mental health disturbances should be a focus of fire departments’ occupational health screening programs, along with trialling interventions designed to maximise sleep.”Without enough sleep, the brain can also accumulate damaging molecules. Science Daily reported on another paper in the Journal of Neuroscience that found an association between lack of sleep and accumulation of beta-amyloid and tau proteins, the molecules that are diagnostic of Alzheimer’s Disease. For your protection in your old age, be sure you get enough sleep. Sleeping on your side is best, says Medical Xpress. That posture not only helps your repair machinery eliminate “brain waste” most efficiently, it also helps prevent neck and back strain.Your life will be richer if you live in harmony with the way your body and brain were designed. The Creator thought of everything. Even though the world is fallen from its original perfection, we have ample testimony of God’s design for our joy, peace and health, if we will learn from God’s word and obey it. Learn to love what is good for you, and be grateful. Gratitude increases as we learn about God’s designs, such as DNA repair during sleep and the benefits of natural environments for our eyes and minds. Our greatest need, however, is not bodily health. We need to be “born again” to have spiritual health and a proper relationship with our Maker. Even the most disabled person can have that greatest need fulfilled in his or her spirit. See our Site Map for trail markers on how to get on the straight and narrow path to the joy of the Lord.(Visited 245 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

Sibella, Karoo’s queen of the cheetahs, dies

first_img15 September 2015Sibella the cheetah died early in the morning in the Samara Private Game Reserve near Graaff-Reinet after a clash with a duiker buck it was hunting. The cheetah suffered a deep wound to its abdomen.Born wild in North West province, Sibella was rehomed in Samara in 2003. It had been captured and tortured by hunters at the age of two. Sibella died on Friday, 11 September.“Lying at death’s door, she was fortunate enough to be rescued by the De Wildt Cheetah and Wildlife Trust. She owes her life to the five-hour surgery and dedicated rehabilitation that ensued,” said Margie Varney, Samara general manager, said at the time of the relocation.Sibella began a new chapter in December 2003, when it was released on to the Samara game reserve. The release surpassed all expectations.Samara Private Game Reserve lies 20km southeast of Graaff-Rienet in Eastern Cape. It encompasses not only the Karoo mountain complex and parts of the Great Escarpment, but also sweeping plains to create a unique area for wildlife, including four of South Africa’s seven natural biomes. It is home to a variety of buck, birdlife and smaller carnivores, including the African wild cat and brown hyena, but is most famous for its Cheetah Metapopulation Programme, managed by the Endangered Wildlife Trust, of which Sibella was the most fruitful participant.Sibella reared an astonishing 20 cubs in four litters at Samara, alone contributing to a 3% increase in the wild cheetah population in South Africa.According to Varney, Sibella was a consummate mother, giving birth on steep mountain slopes to evade other predators, and always making sure the cubs had enough to eat and were well-protected before going out on their own.Sibella had shared an extraordinary bond with humans. “With the birth of each new litter, when the cubs were old enough to leave their den, this wild cat dutifully presented to her human guardians her latest bundles of fur. The degree of trust she vested in human beings, walking to within just a few metres of them, was simply astounding – her past suffering at the hands of her tormentors all but forgotten,” Varney said.On the official Samara blog, a simple message from Varney and the rest of the reserve team offered some final words on the loss of Sibella: “We mourn her loss but seek comfort in knowing that she lived and died in a wild environment. We feel incredibly privileged to have been witness to the life of this exceptional cat.”On social media, wildlife photographers, conservationists and ordinary people from around the world posted heartfelt messages and photos of Sibella, queen of the Karoo cheetahs.Rest in Peace, Sibella . @samarakaroo #cheetah #SouthAfrica http://t.co/WW1CxNXHLC— Marcy Mendelson (@MendelsonImages) Septemb er 11, 2015Iconic “matriarch’ Cheetah Sibella dies http://t.co/6bleCsbg55#Op4Cheetahs #Sibella pic.twitter.com/HmBxga9Enk— #Op4Cheetahs (@Op4Cheetahs) September 12, 2015Ah. But what a legendary cheetah she was! Samara’s Sibella is no more. http://t.co/KRYpECB9Fs— Julienne du Toit (@KarooSpace) September 12, 2015SAinfo reporterlast_img read more

The lowdown on farm loan waivers

first_imgWhat is it?Farm loan waivers are not new to the Indian economy. In 2008-09, the UPA-I government announced a farm loan waiver of ₹60,000 crore (that was the initial estimate, which went up to over ₹70,000 crore later). It hit the exchequer, and not the banks, but it distorted the credit culture since it discouraged farmers from paying up their dues. In addition, when one State offered a waiver, it raised expectations in other States too. Since the BJP took office in May 2014, starting with Andhra Pradesh, several States have joined the farm loan waiver bandwagon, with Uttar Pradesh and Maharashtra being the most recent ones, despite Union Finance Minister Arun Jaitley’s stand that the States would have to foot the bill.Mr. Jaitley had shown resolve to maintain fiscal discipline during his budget speech earlier this year, which was lauded by industry and investors. Hence, he told the States that the Centre would not pay for the waiver. On the other hand, the Reserve Bank of India (RBI) warned about the deteriorating fiscal position of the States. “We need to create consensus so that such loan waiver promises are eschewed. Otherwise, sub-sovereign fiscal challenges in this context could eventually affect the national balance sheet,” RBI Governor Urjit Patel said. He pointed out that if on account of loan waivers, the overall government borrowing went up, yields on government bonds would also be impacted. In a cascading effect, this would crowd out private borrowers as higher government borrowing could lead to an increase in the cost of borrowing for others.How did it come about?Two successive years of below normal rainfall, in FY14 and FY15, are being seen as the main reason for the loan waiver demand. But the recent farmers’ unrest in Madhya Pradesh took place despite a good monsoon that resulted in a bumper crop. However, the prices of farm produce came under pressure because of demonetisation as there were ‘fire sales’ of vegetables — a fact which was acknowledged by the RBI. The sharp decline in food prices in the consumer price index-based inflation was evident. Retail inflation dropped to 2.18% in May as the decline in the prices of food and beverages was sharper in May than April (-0.22% in May against 1.21% in April).Why does it matter?The loan waiver will have a significant impact on the States’ finances. According to a report by the State Bank of India, the impact on Punjab will be the maximum, with the State’s fiscal deficit jumping by an additional 4.8% of the GSDP. The report says that the States will make provisions for farm loan waiver in their budgets in multiple years. In its recent report on the States’ finances, the RBI also pointed to the worsening position of their financial health. It noted that the consolidated finance of the States had deteriorated in recent years, with the gross fiscal deficit to GDP ratio averaging 2.5% in the last five years (from 2011-12 to 2015-16), compared with 2.1% during the previous five-year period.The RBI observed that the State governments faced severe resource constraints as their non-debt receipts were often insufficient for fulfilling their development obligations. There is one positive aspect of the current loan waiver schemes, as highlighted by some economists: the schemes announced in several States have emphasised that loans should be waived only up to a specified threshold limit (mostly ₹1 lakh), and any amount over that will have to be paid.What next?More such schemes will possibly follow as the States going to the polls have started upping the ante for a farm loan waiver. There are protests in several parts of Gujarat demanding a waiver. The State will go to the polls later this year.Bankers have been concerned about this. As SBI Chairman Arundhati Bhattacharya put it: “In case of a farm loan waiver, there is always a fall in credit discipline because the people who get the waiver have expectations of future waivers. Future loans given often remain unpaid.”last_img read more