Signature day for governor

first_img AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREGame Center: Chargers at Kansas City Chiefs, Sunday, 10 a.m.AB 1471 by Assemblyman Mike Feuer, D-Los Angeles, will require semiautomatic handguns made and sold in California to include crime-fighting technology that will microstamp each bullet fired from the gun. It’s also the first such measure in the nation. The NRA and other foes argued that the technique is not reliable and could be used to implicate innocent people. Schwarzenegger said, in his signing message, that he understands the technology is not perfect, but hopes it will provide law enforcement with a new tool to solve violent crimes. The law won’t take effect until 2010. The governor also signed AB 821 by Assemblyman Pedro Nava, D-Santa Barbara, banning lead ammunition in certain areas of the state where lead bullets are believed to be the source of poisoning of endangered condors. Copper ammunition will instead be allowed. Audubon California representatives praised the governor’s decision, calling the legislation a creative solution that allows wildlife protection and hunting to coexist. Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger signed legislation Sunday making California the first state in the nation to ban the use of a toxic chemical in baby toys, forging a theme of defying conservative interests as he pushed toward a midnight deadline to deal with more than 950 bills sent to his desk by state lawmakers. Despite industry opposition, the Republican governor signed AB 1108 by Assemblywoman Fiona Ma, D-San Francisco, prohibiting the use of phthalates to make plastic flexible. “When a child puts a phthalate-laden teether in her mouth,” said Rachel Gibson of Environment California, “it’s like sucking on a toxic lollipop.” Perhaps the biggest news over the weekend came when the governor signed two ammunition- related bills vigorously opposed by the National Rifle Association. But Lawrence Keane, of the National Shooting Sports Foundation, said that Schwarzenegger “has proven to gun owners and sportsmen that he is just another liberal anti-gun Hollywood actor.” And even though the governor, as expected, vetoed the most significant gay-rights legislation – a marriage bill by Assemblyman Mark Leno, D-San Francisco – he signed eight other measures backed by gay-rights advocates. They include implementing joint tax filing by domestic partners and reinforcing anti-discrimination laws for gay youth in schools. Ultimately, this year’s session paled in comparison with last year, when he teamed with Democrats to produce unprecedented legislation to curb global emissions and get $43 billion in infrastructure bonds approved by voters. A budget standoff eroded legislative efforts and a bipartisan atmosphere. Left out was health care reform, sentencing and parole reform as a means to ease overcrowding rather than just new construction, assisted suicide, water storage and redistricting reform. The governor has called lawmakers into special session in hopes of accomplishing what couldn’t be done in the regular session – health care reform and water storage – but it’s far from clear what, if anything, will emerge and it appears more likely that both sides will allow the voters to make the hard choices. Here’s a look at some of the bills the governor vetoed and signed, most of which will take effect Jan. 1: It’s a law Among the bills signed by the governor: SB 22, Sen. Ellen Corbett, D-San Leandro, will require bottled water manufacturers to list the source of their water on the label by 2009. SB 976, Sen. Tom Torlakson, D-Antioch, creates the San Francisco Bay Area Water Emergency Transportation Authority, which would oversee ferries. SB 880, Sen. Ron Calderon, D-Montebello, will end California’s ban on importing or selling kangaroo-skin products. The material is popular for products such as high-performance soccer cleats. SB 362, Sen. Joe Simitian, D-Palo Alto, prohibits employers and others from forcing anyone to have a radio frequency identification device implanted under their skin. SB 586, Sen. Bob Dutton, R-Rancho Cucamonga, sets aside $35 million statewide for housing trusts aimed at affordable housing. AB 236, Assemblyman Ted Lieu, D-Torrance, revamps policies regarding the purchase of vehicles for state and local government fleets in order to increase fuel efficiency and the use of alternative fuels. AB 221, Assemblyman Joel Anderson, R-El Cajon, prohibits the state’s pension funds from investing in companies with active business in Iran. AB 1470, by Assemblyman Jared Huffman, D-San Rafael, creates the Solar Water Heating and Efficiency Act of 2007 to provide incentives for attaining installation of 200,000 solar water heating systems by 2017. AB 34, Assemblyman Anthony Portantino, D-Pasadena, requires the creation of the Umbilical Cord Blood Collection Program and creates a special fund for federal monies and donations to public cord blood banks. AB 1381, Assembly Speaker Fabian Nu ez, D-Los Angeles, establishes the Office of Gang and Youth Violence Policy and requires it to administer various federal grants relating to juvenile justice and street gang crime prevention. AB 1291, Assemblyman Tony Mendoza, D-Artesia, requires, in some cases, that a parent of a minor involved in a first-time gang-related offense be ordered to attend anti-gang violence parenting classes. AB 162, Assemblywoman Lois Wolk, D-Davis, requires cities and counties to address flood-related matters in the land use, conservation, safety and housing elements of their general plans. It’s not a law The governor vetoed the following bills: SB 1, Sen. Gil Cedillo, D-Los Angeles, would have allowed illegal immigrants who are California high school graduates to be eligible for in-state tuition at public colleges and universities. SB 609, Sen. Gloria Romero, D-East Los Angeles, would have prevented what the author called wrongful “snitch” convictions in California. The bill would have provided that a defendant cannot be convicted purely on the uncorroborated testimony of an in-custody informant. SB 63 by Sen. Carole Migden, D-San Francisco, would have required that dairy and meat products from cloned animals intended for human consumption be clearly labeled. AB 45 by Assemblyman Sandre Swanson, D-Oakland which would have returned more powers to the Oakland Unified School District, which was taken over by the state when it went bankrupt. AB 1413 by Anthony Portantino, D-Pasadena, which was aimed at curbing salary hikes for California State University System officials. sgessinger@angnewspapers.com (916) 447-9302160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more

The Canon 5D Mark IV: The End of An Era

first_imgThe 5D was always for photographers. The Canon 5D Mark IV makes it official.All images and videos via Canon It’s finally here. The Canon 5D Mark IV has officially been announced and is available for pre-order. Photographers will be pretty happy, and videographers will continue to wonder what camera to get next.With an MSRP of $3499, the camera will still be a great option for photographers. The stills are great, and the upgrades from the Mark III are plentiful. Seeing that this is a community and blog focused on videographers, let’s talk about the video capabilities.We were pretty excited about the long overdue update, as detailed in the several camera rumor posts written this year. Yet with every new rumor, our interest waned. Now that the Canon 5D Mark IV is here, I know I’m personally full of disappointment. This camera’s video capabilities are the epitome of — MEH. Remember back in school when you really wanted that awesome new toy, and you annoyed your parents until they caved? Then when you got it, you played with it for a whopping two minutes before it broke or bored you? That is the Canon 5D Mark IV for me. Videographers clamored for 4K footage for years from a Canon DSLR, the 5D Mark IV delivers by shooting 4K video up to 30fps.This is credited as “the first full-frame Canon DSLR to shoot high-quality slow motion” if you need 120fps in 720p. Let’s be honest, this isn’t a slow-motion video camera. In fact, the Canon 5D Mark IV isn’t a video camera at all. It never was, and now we know it never will be. This DSLR was always built for photographers, and Canon just happened to luck into the video industry. If you want a Canon video camera, that’s why the Cinema EOS series exists.Canon released a whole series of videos for the launch of the 5D Mark IV. The video that got all the attention (and probably budget) promotes the camera’s photography specs and new internal updates. Take a look here.As far as videos promoting the video capabilities, the videos are lackluster at best. In fact, I can’t believe that most of these are officially released videos. Here is a short 3:20 clip (even though it feels much longer) showing off the 5D Mark IV at the beach.We know the photos will look great, so timelapse videos should look stellar. Why they released a demo timelapse video of a person building a wooden ship in a controlled studio environment that is in need of more light, I have no idea.I guess for those wanting to use the 5D Mark IV’s wifi capabilities with their phones to instantly post to social media, Canon released this vertical demo of slow-motion footage. It’s a very odd approach, as the footage doesn’t look much better had it been shot on the phone itself.These have to be the most bizarre product release videos I’ve ever seen from a major manufacturer. The only decent promo for the cameras video specs came from Bruce Dorn, who demonstrates shooting 4K and pulling stills from 4K footage.In the end, this camera will still make a ton of money, but I’m fairly certain that this iteration of the 5D will officially make videographers jump ship to the likes of Sony a Series or Panasonic Lumix G series.If you had any doubt on the camera’s intended audience, this should clear things up. This image is on the Canon Australia homepage. Actual Australian Ad via CanonFor photographers interested in specs, and videographers looking for something to complain about, here are all the camera details.Specs:Canon EF Mount30.4MP Full-Frame CMOS SensorDIGIC 6+ Image Processor3.2″ 1.62m-Dot Touchscreen LCD MonitorDCI 4K Video at 30 fps; 8.8MP Still Grab1080p up to 60fps720p up to 120fps61-Point High Density Reticular AFNative ISO 32000, Expanded to ISO 102400Dual Pixel RAW; AF Area Select ButtonDual Pixel CMOS AF and Movie Servo AF7 fps Shooting; CF & SD Card SlotsBuilt-In GPS and Wi-Fi with NFCWhat are your thoughts on the Canon 5D Mark IV? Share your opinions in the comment section below.last_img read more

‘My Pinoy grandpa inspired me to play’

first_imgRobredo should’ve resigned as drug czar after lack of trust issue – Panelo MOST READ FEU Auditorium’s 70th year celebrated with FEU Theater Guild’s ‘The Dreamweavers’ Trump strips away truth with hunky topless photo tweet Lacson: SEA Games fund put in foundation like ‘Napoles case’ Trending Articles PLAY LIST 00:50Trending Articles00:50Trending Articles00:50Trending Articles02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games National Coffee Research Development and Extension Center brews the 2nd National Coffee Education Congress Fernando, Mauricio split bikes race honors Like Christian, who went to University of Nebraska and then University of Hawaii, the sisters took their volleyball acts to the United States before returning to Germany after graduation to play in the regional leagues.Standhardinger applied for the 2014 NBA Rookie Draft but was not selected. (Like him, Jared Dillinger also played for the University of Hawaii Rainbow Warriors).The Filipino-German became available for the Gilas squad after his contract with SC Rasta Vechta in Germany’s ProA league expired. He was the league MVP last season.His trump card has always been his work ethic and how he plays the game.Gilas characterADVERTISEMENT “Christian plays hard all the way,” Gilas assistant coach Jimmy Alapag says. “He’s exactly the kind of player this team needs, the type of player that fits the Gilas character.”Standhardinger played his guts out in the Jones Cup, holding his own in a tough international field that saw the Philippines play against a European power in Lithuania, traditional Asian contenders like Iran, South Korea and Chinese Taipei and the experienced Canada 150 side that eventually won the championship.It’s evident in Taipei that Standhardinger is all heart on the court. In several interviews with the international media, he proudly yelled “Puso!”, the battlecry of the Gilas Nationals.Standhardinger will suit up in the Fiba Asia tournament in Beirut, Lebanon, replacing Andray Blatche—the country’s naturalized player since the 2014 World Cup in Spain—who refused to go with the team for the Aug. 8 to 20 showcase.After that, the pony-tailed National will head straight to Kuala Lumpur for the Southeast Asian Games, where the Philippines will try to win its 19th basketball gold and keep its supremacy in the region.Naturalized playerStandhardinger will play as a naturalized player in the Asian championship and as a Filipino in the SEA Games. His failure to get a Philippine passport before he turned 16 is the thing that’s keeping him from playing as a Filipino in tournaments supervised by the Fiba.But with dual citizenship, he is eligible to play in the PBA as a local. And that is certainly enticing news for any ball club rebuilding for the next season. Christian Standhardinger. Photo by Randolph B. Leongson/ INQUIRER.netChristian Standhardinger has been dribbling a ball ever since he was a small boy. In his early years, like most boys growing up in Germany, he did it with his feet in an open grass field.“I’m a late bloomer (in basketball),” Standhardinger told the Inquirer after Gilas Pilipinas finished fourth in the Jones Cup in Taipei, where he made his international debut for the country. “I have my grandfather to thank for that.”ADVERTISEMENT The 6-foot-8 forward from Munich took to basketball when he was 12, encouraged by Pablo Hermoso, the father of his mom, the former Elizabeth Santos Hermoso. It started his love affair with the sport.“My grandfather took me to parks whenever he played,” he said of Pablo Hermoso, who saw action for Shell in the CYMCA league in the 1950s. “He was the one who influenced me to [play] basketball. I played whenever he played.”FEATURED STORIESSPORTSSEA Games: Biñan football stadium stands out in preparedness, completionSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSWin or don’t eat: the Philippines’ poverty-driven, world-beating pool starsStandhardinger never forgot his heritage—especially the basketball part of it—that he finally considered a two-year-old offer by Gilas coach Chot Reyes to play for the national team.“I don’t know what the future brings, but right now, my heart is with my national team,” Standhardinger said.Volleyball-playing sistersIndeed, basketball has become a career for Christian, the eldest in a brood of three of Guenther Standhardinger and Elizabeth. His sisters, twins Kathrin and Kristin, are a year younger at 27 and play competitive volleyball. LATEST STORIES Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. 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