Half-time: Fulham 0 Cardiff City 1

first_imgPoor defending from Fulham saw them go a goal down four minutes before the break.Despite having the better of the chances in the first half, the Whites were caught out when Aron Gunnarsson escaped the attentions of Richard Stearman and, with the outside of his right boot, clipped in a cross for Lex Immers, who was left totally unmarked to head in.Cardiff almost doubled their lead immediately afterwards as Sean Morrison’s header came back off the post.Fulham had had the better of the first half chances prior to the goal, with Emerson Hyndman and Ross McCormack both denied by Cardiff keeper David Marshall.Slavisa Jokanovic’s side, chasing a third league win in seven days, looked bright going forward and Moussa Dembele skied an early shot from the edge of the box.Cardiff, who need the points to keep in touching distance of the play-off places, responded with headers from Gunnarsson and Bruno Ecuele-Manga, which did not unduly threaten the home goal.Hyndman, who replaced the injured Tom Cairney in the starting line-up, showed the energy he can bring to the side when he intercepted a pass on the halfway line, strode forward 40 yards and then getting a shot away which Marshall palmed behind.Marshall was also equal to McCormack’s curling free-kick, but Fulham were left to rue lapses of concentration at the back when Cardiff went in front.Fulham: Bettinelli; Stearman, Madl, Amorebieta, Garbutt; Tunnicliffe, Parker, Ince, Hyndman; McCormack, Dembele.Subs: Lonergan, Fredericks, Burn, Baird, Christensen, Woodrow, Smith.Cardiff: Marshall; Peltier, Morrison; Ecuele-Manga, Malone; Noone, Gunnarsson, Ralls, Whittingham; Lawrence, Immers. Subs: Moore, Fabio, Connolly, Dikgacoi, O’Keefe, Zohore, Saadi.Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more

Hall of Fame QB Brett Favre a fan of the 49ers, sounds like he wants to join in the fun

first_imgBrett Favre recently turned 50. He hasn’t thrown a football in anger in nine years. But he still recognizes a good team when he sees one. When the talk turns to the 49ers, Favre’s a fan.“You know, in that (Saints) game, (Jimmy) Garoppolo, as well as (Kyle) Shanahan, we have to be perfect with our execution,” Favre said during a recent appearance on SiriusXM NFL Radio. “We have to come away with points almost every time.”How cool is that? Brett sounds fired up, practically inserting himself …last_img read more

Investing in the Eastern Cape

first_imgThe Eastern Cape offers major cities, airports, ports as well as a dynamic manufacturing sector which includes the southern African bases of some of the world’s major companies.The Eastern Cape offers modern infrastructure for import and export, such as the deep-water Port of Ngqura near Port Elizabeth. (Image: Brand South Africa)John YoungThe Eastern Cape is on the south-eastern coast of Africa, a location that is proving to be an international asset. The allocation of two of South Africa’s five industrial development zones (IDZs) to the province is confirmation of the potential that is offered by the shipping traffic that operates between Europe and Asia and the Far East.Eastern Cape overviewEastern Cape governmentEastern Cape Development CorporationThe province is well served logistically, with two major airports in Port Elizabeth and East London, and several facilities serving smaller towns such as Mthatha and Bhisho. In addition, many farms and private game reserves have airstrips.The construction of the large new port at Ngqura, within the Coega IDZ, brings to three the number of effective ports operating in the Eastern Cape.The province’s road network is defined by the west-east axis of the coastal N2, with three other national routes (N9, N10 and N6) providing north-south routes through the region.The reopening of the Mthatha-East London line is a step along the path of revitalising the province’s rail network, a vital part of any rural upliftment plan.Varied topographical and climatic conditions contribute to a diverse agricultural offering that includes wool, mohair, dairy and forestry, and make for a superb tourist destination.The Eastern Cape is home to four of South Africa’s biggest automotive companies and several of the largest concerns in the automotive components and support sectors. The catalytic convertor industry is a world leader.Transformative projectsProjects that are due to come on stream at the Coega IDZ have the potential to transform the provincial economy. In the medium-term, Coega is the preferred site of a new oil refinery. Project Mthombo, set to be completed in 2017 according to the plan, would cost about R77-billion and create 18 000 jobs in the operational phase.The plan to locate a new manganese processing plant at Coega will similarly inject massive amounts of capital into the province, and have a sustained downstream effect on related industries and suppliers. Investment at the Port of Ngqura, part of the Coega IDZ, is scheduled to reach R4-billion in the period 2011-2016.Port Elizabeth’s port has for many years been the site of a manganese-exporting facility. The idea is to move that to Ngqura, together with the existing liquid-bulk terminal.Once these facilities are located away from the Port of Port Elizabeth, large parts of the harbour will be available for redevelopment for retail and leisure. This has been a plan for some time, part of a broader plan to revitalise the harbour and neighbouring beachfront.The Nelson Mandela Bay Metropolitan Municipality, through its Mandela Bay Development Agency (MBDA), has plans to spend R40-million on beachfront development. The MBDA has spent R250-million on upgrading Govan Mbeki Avenue and other parts of the inner city. It has also supported 67 tourism projects.The province’s automotive producers export just more than half of the motor vehicles produced in South Africa. The companies that operate in the Eastern Cape are Mercedes-Benz SA (East London), Volkswagen (Uitenhage), and General Motors South Africa and Ford, both in Port Elizabeth. The Ford plant assembles engines.All of these companies have invested heavily in increased production in recent years. These operations support many subsidiary industries such as pressed steel, plastics, and leather for car seats. Port Elizabeth has become a world leader in the production of catalytic converters.The Nelson Mandela Bay Logistics Park (NMBLP) serves as an automotive cluster, supplying logistical support and economies of scale for companies servicing the motor industry in Port Elizabeth and Uitenhage. National government has allocated R30- million to this project in its medium-term expenditure framework.The East London Industrial Development Zone has a similar initiative which is attracting automotive-supply companies.The province’s exports have been doing well in recent times, driven by a large increase in vehicle sales. Volkswagen Group South Africa won the Exporter of the Year in 2011, awarded by the Nelson Mandela Bay Business Chamber.Howden Donkin, a company making fans, blowers and accessories, won the award for exporting by smaller businesses. Morgan Cargo was acknowledged for its excellent service to exporters.Other major manufacturing sectors in the province are food and beverages (Cadbury, Nestle, SAB, Clover, Dairybelle) and pharmaceutical (Aspen).Key factsThe Eastern Cape extends over 169 580 square kilometres, representing 13.9% of South Africa’s land mass.The province has more livestock than any other province, with a fifth of the country’s cattle, a quarter of its sheep and nearly half its goats. Mohair is a speciality of the Karoo region.The province’s population of 6.9 million makes it the country’s third-most populous province, with about 15% of the national population.TourismTourism is a major growth industry. Addo Elephant National Park is the largest of the province’s four national parks and there are more than a dozen provincial parks and a growing number of private game farms, lodges and reserves.The province’s beaches and waves are very popular, with adventure tourism luring in tourists wanting to go on 4×4 trails, jump off bridges or fly microlight aircraft.Alternative energiesThe Eastern Cape receives a lot of sunlight and it has areas along its coastline that can easily transfer wind into energy. These and other options in the alternative energy field, including biofuels, are being actively investigated with some sizable investments already having been made.InvestmentProvincial government expenditure in the Eastern Cape was 60.5% higher in March 2011 than it was in March 2010. This is according to the Eastern Cape Barometer, an economic tracking programme that is a joint initiative of Sake24 and BoE Private Clients.The biggest growth subsectors were agriculture, transport and manufacturing but it was the state spending that took the province’s Barometer growth index to its highest- ever point – 19%.According to the provincial Department of Economic Development and Environmental Affairs, total gross domestic fixed investment in the Eastern Cape has been dominated by the machinery/other equipment and building and construction sectors over the last 13 years. The machinery/other equipment sector contributed 44% of fixed investment in the period 1995-2008, with building and construction averaging 41% in the same period.Mega-projects such as the refinery and the manganese plant together with the huge amounts of money committed by motor manufacturers and suppliers are signs of the growing confidence in the Eastern Cape as an investment destination.Other significant investments made into the region in the course of 2009 and 2010 were:A diamond-beneficiation project in the East London Industrial Development Zone. This will help South Africa to beneficiate more of its own resources and create opportunities for skilled employment.The Sunningdale Dairy being established in the ELIDZ.The construction of the SAS Radisson Port Elizabeth (Radisson Blu Hotel), an investment of R320-million and a significant addition to the tourism offering of the region.A facility in the ELIDZ intended to produce 300 000 flat-panel solar-water heaters, as well as more affordable vacuum-based systems per year. The Eastern Cape Development Corporation (ECDC) holds 15% equity in a firm of mostly Taiwanese investors and is putting R20-million of the R33-million capital into the start-up. Some 250 direct and indirect jobs will be created.The opening of the R1.5-billion Hemingways Mall in East London. Put together by the Billion Group, at 210 000 square metres, it is the biggest shopping centre in the Eastern Cape.The investment in two call centres in the Coega IDZ.Several wind-farm projects are either being constructed or are under consideration. Belgian company Electrawinds has started installing 25 wind turbines at Coega Industrial Development Zone while Rainmaker Energy, an independent power producer (IPP), is planning two new wind-power projects in the Eastern Cape, the Dorper project and the AB’s project. Together, the two projects will generate 610 megawatts.Other municipalitiesAlfred Nzo District MunicipalityTowns: Matatiele, Mount Frere, Mount AyliffThe smallest district is located in the mountainous north-east, with hiking trails being an attraction for tourists. Subsistence agriculture and forestry are the major economic activities.Cacadu District MunicipalityTowns: Graaff-Reinet, Cradock, Humansdorp, Jeffreys Bay, GrahamstownThe western part of the province contains the biggest municipality and is one of the biggest contributors to provincial GDP. Large commercial farms in the Karoo produce quality meat, wool and mohair, while the coastal belt has dairy farming and some forestry. The Kouga Valley is a big deciduous fruit producer, while the area around Kirkwood/Addo is known for its citrus.Cacadu has three of the region’s national parks (Camdeboo, Tsitsikamma and Addo Elephant Park) and several private game farms. Grahamstown is the venue of the National Arts Festival, while Jeffreys Bay is among the top surfing spots in the world.Chris Hani District MunicipalityTowns: Middelburg, Molteno, Dordrecht, Queenstown, Lady Frere, ElliotSheep farming is an important part of the economy. Some coal is found in the north and tourist activities include fly-fishing. The Nola factory in Molteno manufactures Ouma rusks. The Grootfontein Agricultural College and Research Station is in Middelburg, and the Marlow Agricultural College is near Cradock.OR Tambo District MunicipalityTowns: Mthatha, Coffee Bay, Port St Johns, Qumbu, Bizana, FlagstaffOR Tambo District Municipality encompasses some of the province’s least-developed areas and contains one of South Africa’s most important ecological areas, the Pondoland Centre of Plant Endemism. Mining is already pursued in some areas, but plans to allow titanium mining on seaside dunes are being contested.There is great potential for tourism. A Wild Coast Spatial Development Initiative exists to plot further development. Magwa Tea Estate and forestry concerns are among the biggest employers.Joe Gqabi District MunicipalityTowns: Aliwal North, Burgersdorp, Lady Grey, Rhodes, Barkly East, UgieCattle and sheep farming make up 80% of land use, while commercial forestry is a big contributor to employment. The hot springs at Aliwal North and skiing at Tiffendell are two major tourist attractions.This is an edited version of an article published by Frontier Market Network. Republished here with kind permission. Copyright © Frontier Market Intelligence Ltd. All rights reservedReviewed: September 2013last_img read more

Active citizenship in memory of Mandela – Bachelet

first_imgOn stage at the Cape Town city hall for the Nelson Mandela Annual Lecture 2014, from left: Chilean President Michelle Bachelet, Mandela’s widow Graça Machel, Nelson Mandela Centre of Memory chief executive Sello Hatang, Cape Town mayor Patricia de Lille, and veteran South African actor John Kani. (Image: Nelson Mandela Centre of Memory)• Nelson Mandela Centre of Memory+27 11 547 5600info@nelsonmandela.org107 Central StreetHoughton2198South AfricaLorraine KearneyThe challenges of social integration were increasing, and it was essential to update democracy. “We must take on the challenges of the future, not just consolidate our wins.”Chilean President Michelle Bachelet expressed these sentiments in delivering the 12th Nelson Mandela Annual Lecture, in the City Hall, Cape Town, on Women’s Day – 9 August.The lecture was particularly significant as it was from the City Hall that Mandela first addressed South Africans and the world following his release from prison on 11 February 1990. It was also the place from where he first spoke to South Africans as their president on 9 May 1994. And it was also particularly poignant as it was the first annual lecture to be given since his death on 5 December last year – a fact mentioned by more than one speaker.Women’s Day, a national public holiday, commemorates the day in 1956 when about 20 000 women of all races marched to the Union Buildings in Pretoria to demand that women not be required to carry passes.Watch Chilean President Michelle Bachelet deliver the 12th Nelson Mandela Annual Lecture:The topic of Bachelet’s lecture was “Building social cohesion through active citizenship”. She also focused on education and community participation in democracy.She paid tribute to Mandela, saying his life had been based on a “profound certainty that there are no differences that justify discrimination, violence, abuse or oppression”. He had shown that the only viable path was one of cohesion and unity. She also honoured Archbishop Emeritus Desmond Tutu, one of the many dignitaries in the audience, for having convened the Truth and Reconciliation Commission, and for the similar process in Chile.It was one of several historical similarities between the two countries on their path to democracy that she listed: “It can be said we share a common wound, a common pain, but we also share a sense of common pride.”In speaking about democracy today, Bachelet said: “Economic growth and reducing inequality are essential, but are not enough. The growing new middle class brings new challenges that pose new tasks. Confidence in institutions is weakening – this is a global trend. This puts at risk our democracy… Society has changed, the world has changed, and people around the world are asking more of their governments,” she said. “Today, legitimacy and justice are more than just legality. More and better democratic policies of inclusion are needed.”And to get there, changes must be driven by society. Representative democracy was no longer enough; people were now demanding participation. “But to take part requires more than just voting. This is key to modern democracy.” Indeed this was the core of her lecture: society was opening spaces and forums where these new demands could be reflected. It was time for structural changes, but there was no magic recipe for this. “But the wrong path is denying citizens their participation.”Bachelet pointed out that sub-Saharan Africa had experience strong economic growth in recent years, but half the population still lived on less than $1.25 a day “This strong economic performance is not filtering down. It is the same in Latin America and the Caribbean. There is some encouragement in the growth of the middle class, but the inequality gap is high and is growing.“We need more equal distribution of wealth.” To get there, the public sector needed strengthening.Archbishop Emeritus Desmond Tutu, Michelle Bachelet and Sello Hatang at the lecture. (Image: Nelson Mandela Centre of Memory)Gender equalityIn building a socially cohesive, democratic society in which all people participate meaningfully, there needs to be equality between the sexes. Yet, Bachelet pointed out, cultural, economic, social and political discrimination against women remained one of the “most scandalous unequal situations on the planet”. Six out of 10 poor people were women; 75% of women could not get a bank loan because they were in unstable or unpaid jobs. Sexism was rife and there was a lack of representation in business.She spoke about policies being set up in Chile to assist women. “[Equality] needs to be promoted in every country. We need to make gender equality a state objective.” But to do so “requires us to rethink our ways of cultural identity. We need to ask: ‘How can we make living together possible?’ It is a complex task in permanent evolution.”Chile, and the world, had a lot to learn from South Africa, and from Mandela’s attempts to build a unified nation. To get there, structural changes were needed – and effort had to be made to make cultural changes. “Above all, we must build a culture that allows us to recognise our self in others. To do this requires active citizens … Chile is proposing that people take this responsibility to grow social cohesion.”Importance of educationBachelet also spoke about improving education, as a crucial tool to ensure a democratic, socially inclusive nation. The challenge was “not only access to education, but also quality education”. Structural changes were needed to achieve this; it should be an economic, social and political goal simultaneously.She quoted Mandela, saying that education was the most powerful weapon to change the world, but added that action was needed to reach this goal. Non-negotiable was passion, the ability to listen and the active participation of citizens who could also listen to constructive criticism.In ending her lecture, Bachelet referred to South Africa as the cradle of humanity: “In this land that is the birthplace of the human species, we can dream of a new humanity… We have hope to build a common future.”At the press conference after the lecture, she said: “Mandela has been the leader who inspired me all my life. He has taught us so much.”Returning to education, she announced that in 2015, Chile would launch 50 Nelson Mandela scholarships for post-graduate students from Africa to attend Chilean universities. A statue of Mandela would also be commissioned for a public park in Santiago, and Chile planned to convene a “conversation” involving South Africa, Chile and other Latin American countries going through a transitional justice process so that they could learn from each other.Her lecture was well-received by an audience that consisted of dignitaries, activists and ordinary folk, as well as Nkosi Zwelivelile Mandla Mandela, Mandela’s grandson. The Nelson Mandela Foundation website reported that he found the lecture to be insightful. Bachelet made it clear that being an elected official meant you had to continue to speak on behalf of people, the Mvezo chief said.“This is to ensure service delivery and to be a true reflection of what is happening in the country… We must strive to make a better world. Her excellency has called us back to the drawing board, and has raised questions: have we done enough to recognise indigenous people? Is there still a role in post-apartheid South Africa for traditional leaders?” he said.Archbishop Emeritus Desmond Tutu, who delivered the Nelson Mandela Annual Lecture in 2004, was also upbeat as he walked out of the hall. Showing the victory sign, he said the lecture had been “wonderful to listen to”, and Bachelet had been “fantastic”.last_img read more

The Last Transition…or Not

first_imgReflections on Todd & Peggy Podcast #3By Karen Shirer, Associate Dean The audio recording below is the third part of a conversation with Todd, a lieutenant commander in the United States Navy Nurse Corps, and his wife Peggy, an elementary school teacher. Peggy and Todd generously shared some of their experiences as a military family, to help those of us serving military families have a better understanding of what they go through. Below the recording you’ll find a blog post reflecting on this part of Todd and Peggy’s story. This is part 3 – The Last Transition…or Not Audio Player/files/2016/03/MFLN-FT-Todd-and-Peggy-3-2.mp300:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume. Listen to Todd & Peggy Podcast #2 Listen to Todd & Peggy Podcast #1 The Last Transition … or Not“When one parent in a family serves in the military, the whole family serves. Military life requires great commitment and sacrifice not only for the service member but also the spouse, children and other family members.”The above thought occurred to me as I listened to podcast #3 where Todd and Peggy reflect back on their experiences as a couple and a family with children as he pursued his military career. Military service with its deployments, weekend trainings and other demands impact the whole family and not just the service member.In this podcast, Todd and Peggy discuss their next transition – retirement from the military. Their experience shows how important it is for couples to discuss not only the timing of this transition but also what it means for their relationship and their family.As a couple, Todd and Peggy agreed that he will retire from the military either in 5 years or if he is deployed again. They decided that as a family they did not want to go through the experience of another deployment.  However, both Todd and Peggy recognized that after retirement, the military will remain an important part of their everyday lives.Military service itself is not so difficult – military members train for it – but separation from family can be very difficult. It takes a toll on the children who tend to become more connected with the stay-at-home parent. Peggy talks about being a single parent during deployments and Todd described feeling that his relationship with his children at times was not as “tight” as Peggy’s.Long deployments also can negatively impact a couple’s marriage. Todd notes that many marriages do not survive the separations of military service. Couples not only need to spend time preparing for the financial aspects of deployment but also for the relational and emotional aspects.  Todd believes that the military could do more to prepare service members for these latter challenges.Todd and Peggy were the fortunate ones; the podcast interview shows that they weathered those difficult transitions and developed an even stronger marriage. However, significant numbers of military marriages do not survive.When asked to give one word to describe his military service, Todd said “service” to country and that he dedicated his life to the military. Peggy responded with the word “pride,” saying that she was proud of everything Todd has done. Despite the hardships, both Todd and Peggy were proud of his accomplishments and felt that the sacrifice was more than worth it.In your work with military members and their families, consider how you might help young service members who are just marrying and beginning their families to prepare for the impacts of military service. What steps can they take now to ensure that they are like Todd and Peggy as they approach retirement with pride and meaning?Karen Shirer is a member of the Military Families Learning Network Family Transitions Team and the Associate Dean with the University of Minnesota, Extension Center for Family Development. Karen is also the parent of two adult daughters, a grandmother, a spouse, and a cancer survivor.last_img read more

Yashwant to visit Gujarat on Congress invitation

first_imgBJP leader Yashwant Sinha, who had recently caused a flutter by criticising the Centre for its handling of the economy, will be on a three-day tour of poll-bound Gujarat starting November 14, on an invitation from an NGO supported by the Congress party.The former Union Finance Minister would interact with the business community and deliver lectures in Ahmedabad, Rajkot and Surat, a Congress leader said on Thursday.The events are slated to be organised by the Loksahi Bachao Andolan (Save Democracy Campaign), an NGO supported by the Congress.Economic featsMr. Sinha, whose son Jayant Sinha is a Minister in the Narendra Modi government, is likely to speak about demonetisation and the GST, the two steps being showcased as major economic achievements by the current dispensation.Former Finance Minister and Congress leader P. Chidambaram had recently interacted with the traders of Rajkot on the GST and on the subject of ‘State of Economy’, though not under the banner of any political party.In a recent newspaper article, Mr. Sinha criticised the Centre and Union Finance Minister Arun Jaitley in particular for the handling of the economy, which he said was on a “downward spiral and is poised for a hard landing”.Mr. Sinha had also written that many people in the BJP were aware of this reality, but not speaking up out of fear.last_img read more

Injured Sushil Kumar to skip Asiad

first_imgWorld champion and Commonwealth Games gold medallist Sushil Kumar will be missing next month’s Asian Games in Guangzhou, China. Sushil has opted out of the Asiad because of a shoulder injury. The wrestler had won the gold medal in the 66 kg freestyle wrestling category at the Commonwealth Games that concluded on Thursday.  Having earlier won a bronze medal at the Beijing Olympics and the world championships in Moscow, much was expected from Sushil during the Asian Games.last_img

Wimbledon 2011: Teenage qualifier Tomic marches into last 8

first_imgAustralian qualifier Bernard Tomic came up with amazing passing shots towards the close to prevail over Xavier Malisse 6-1, 7-5, 6-4 and enter the quarter-finals on Monday.Riding on the support from a sizeable Aussie crowd, Tomic, who was born in Germany before emigrating to Gold Coast, Australia, played with freedom and passion.Having dumped fifth seed Robin Soderling in straight sets on Saturday, Tomic needed just an hour and 21 minutes to do the damage.Standing at six feet four inches, Tomic loved the big match pressure on Court 18 where people could watch the action from close. The last time a qualifier reached this far was in 2000 when Vladimir Voltchkov was on song.With this success, Tomic replaces Lleyton Hewitt as the Australian No. 1 in rankings, though after winning junior Grand Slam titles, he was always tipped to be a player with potential.Malisse argued a lot over the line calls in the first set and was unhappy with his racquet string tension.”Maybe the stringer is Australian,” the Belgian said to the chair umpire at one point.Xavier Malisse returns to Bernard Tomic during their fourth round match at Wimbledon on Monday. AP”I never thought I would be here in the second week. I am looking forward to playing on Wednesday and I have never been happier,” said Tomic.The 18-year-old Australian qualifier is the youngest quarter- finalist since Boris Becker in 1986.In the next round, Tomic will face Novak Djokovic, who defeated France’s Michael Llodra 6-3, 6-3, 6-3.advertisementSecond seed Djokovic beat an out-of-form Llodra.Local favourite Andy Murray also made it to the last eight with a 7-6(3), 6-3, 6-2 victory over Frenchman Richard Gasquet.Murray, the fourth seed, didn’t have much problems with the 30- degree Centre Court heat as he made short work of 17th seed Gasquet.Murray, attempting become Britain’s first men’s Wimbledon champion since Fred Perry in 1936, has now reached his fourth consecutive quarter-final.In the last eight, Murray will clash against Spain’s Feliciano Lopez, who beat Polish qualifier Lukasz Kubot five sets.Lopez, who put out three-time runner-up Andy Roddick in the third round, recovered from two sets to love down defeat Polish qualifier Kubot 3-6, 6-7(5/ 7), 7-6(9/ 7), 7-5, 7-5.”I thought it was good. think I served well, and I got a lot of free points off that,” said Murray, who is yet make a Wimbledon final.Murray also admitted was left red- faced by his unkempt appearance when he was introduced to the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge.”If I’d known they were coming, I would have shaved. I was thinking myself as I came off.”I was sweaty and very hairy. I said to them, ‘I’m sorry, I’m a bit sweaty’. But, yeah, it was really nice,” said the Scot.Results:Men’s singles fourth round: Andy Murray (GBR x4) bt Richard Gasquet (FRA x17) 7-6 (7/3), 6-3, 6-2; Feliciano Lopez (ESP) bt Lukasz Kubot (POL) 3-6, 6-7 (5/7), 7-6 (9/7), 7-5, 7-5; Bernard Tomic (AUS) bt Xavier Malisse (BEL) 6-1, 7-5, 6-4; Novak Djokovic (SRB x2) bt Michael Llodra (FRA x19) 6-3, 6-3, 6-3last_img read more

NS man charged with sexual assault against children spanning two decades

first_imgPETIT-DE-GRAT, N.S. – A 90-year-old Nova Scotia man has been charged with multiple historical sexual offences against children spanning two decades.Delmore Boudreau of Petit-de-Grat has been charged with 12 sexual offences that occurred on the southeastern island of Isle Madame between 1966 and 1986.Police say nine victims, aged four to 12 at the time of the abuse, have been identified and they expect more victims could come forward.Richmond District RCMP in Arichat launched an extensive eight-month investigation into allegations of historical sexual assaults after a victim came forward to police.It’s unclear what Boudreau’s role was in the small coastal community.Police would not say what his position may have been in order to protect the identity of the victims.“What we’re trying to do here is protect the identity of the victims,” Cpl. Jennifer Clarke said Wednesday. “It’s a very small community and a huge issue for that community and those are serious offences.”Boudreau is expected to be in court in Port Hawkesbury on May 28.“It’s a very courageous thing for a victim to come forward,” Clarke said. “The purpose of the release for us is that there may be more victims out there.”last_img read more