Salvadoran Air Force Teaches Youths Aeronautics and Discipline

first_img Full and partial scholarships offered “Everything is provided for our students: food, uniforms, and a quality technical education with training in line with current market demand,” ETAM Director Guadalupe Argueta said. “They also receive behavioral and physical education with military training. This makes the difference in their character.” “But if they have a stronger interest in the aeronautical world and want to expand their field of knowledge, they may enter CIMA’s School of Advanced Military Aeronautics (EPAM), where they could be promoted in their Military career.” “We graduate well-rounded people who join society with all the moral values of the military doctrine: discipline, respect, responsibility, honesty, love for their country and family… This is an advantage over other educational centers in the country.” “We graduate well-rounded people who join society with all the moral values of the military doctrine: discipline, respect, responsibility, honesty, love for their country and family… This is an advantage over other educational centers in the country.” Young people like Viscarra who are accepted into the program at ETAM live at FAES bases during the week and can visit their hometowns on weekends. To provide this opportunity to young people from all socio-economic backgrounds, the FAES General Staff grants full and half scholarships to outstanding students and others whose families have limited monetary resources. Carlos Viscarra, 16, is one beneficiary of the opportunities provided by ETAM. Since January, he has proudly worn the blue uniform for high school students studying aeronautical mechanics — a dream of his that has become a reality through discipline and dedication. For young people to achieve their goals, “the most important thing is discipline because it builds character,” he said. “Of course, we are instilled with values such as respect for national symbols, honesty, punctuality, and responsibility. I feel I’ve grown as a person and a professional; it has been demanding, but satisfying. I’m not the same person.” CIMA graduates are highly sought after by aeronautical companies due to the high standards of educational quality and training they receive, as well as the values they are instilled with. About 50 percent of the students who graduate from the high school program continue technical and aeronautical studies, either in the FAES or at private maintenance companies. Twenty-four percent of graduates choose to continue their training at Captain General Gerardo Barrios Military School, and the others go into private universities or accept jobs at international companies. “I am grateful to be studying what I really enjoy, and my parents are too because they see changes in my behavior,” he said. ” I am more disciplined and responsible. My goal is to join the Military, keep learning, and become a great aircraft mechanic.” Students graduating from ETAM may choose military tactics at the Captain General Gerardo Barrios Military School and become Cadets after two years. At that time, they have to decide which branch of the Armed Forces to continue with: the Army, Navy, or Air Force. If they are selected by the FAES after passing various aptitude tests, they may request to study at CIMA’s Military Aviation School (EAM), where they will graduate as second lieutenants and continue studying to become professional pilots. Young people like Viscarra who are accepted into the program at ETAM live at FAES bases during the week and can visit their hometowns on weekends. To provide this opportunity to young people from all socio-economic backgrounds, the FAES General Staff grants full and half scholarships to outstanding students and others whose families have limited monetary resources. “Our high school graduates are highly skilled in their knowledge of both areas, capable of directly entering a Military career with a specialty in aeronautics or a company with aircraft maintenance needs,” said Col. José Ernesto Aguirre, General Staff College graduate and aviator, and director of the Center. CIMA graduates are highly sought after by aeronautical companies due to the high standards of educational quality and training they receive, as well as the values they are instilled with. About 50 percent of the students who graduate from the high school program continue technical and aeronautical studies, either in the FAES or at private maintenance companies. Twenty-four percent of graduates choose to continue their training at Captain General Gerardo Barrios Military School, and the others go into private universities or accept jobs at international companies. Wow I’d like to be a professional flight pilot so my family could feel proud of me 🙂 By Dialogo May 08, 2015 For young people to achieve their goals, “the most important thing is discipline because it builds character,” he said. “Of course, we are instilled with values such as respect for national symbols, honesty, punctuality, and responsibility. I feel I’ve grown as a person and a professional; it has been demanding, but satisfying. I’m not the same person.” Carlos Viscarra, 16, is one beneficiary of the opportunities provided by ETAM. Since January, he has proudly worn the blue uniform for high school students studying aeronautical mechanics — a dream of his that has become a reality through discipline and dedication. “Our high school graduates are highly skilled in their knowledge of both areas, capable of directly entering a Military career with a specialty in aeronautics or a company with aircraft maintenance needs,” said Col. José Ernesto Aguirre, General Staff College graduate and aviator, and director of the Center. Full and partial scholarships offered “Everything is provided for our students: food, uniforms, and a quality technical education with training in line with current market demand,” ETAM Director Guadalupe Argueta said. “They also receive behavioral and physical education with military training. This makes the difference in their character.” Viscarra is not only working toward his dreams, but also steering clear of the gang violence which mars life in the the municipality of Zacatecoluca, Department of La Paz, where he lives with his parents. CIMA graduates are in high demand Viscarra is not only working toward his dreams, but also steering clear of the gang violence which mars life in the the municipality of Zacatecoluca, Department of La Paz, where he lives with his parents. Hundreds of young people who study aeronautics in high school have been invited to participate at the Salvadorean Air Force (FAES, for its Spanish acronym) Center for Military Aeronautical Training (CIMA, for its Spanish acronym). Through its Technical School for Aviation Mechanics (ETAM), CIMA trains people with significant theoretical knowledge and skills in the fields of Military aviation and aerospace mechanics. “But if they have a stronger interest in the aeronautical world and want to expand their field of knowledge, they may enter CIMA’s School of Advanced Military Aeronautics (EPAM), where they could be promoted in their Military career.” “I am grateful to be studying what I really enjoy, and my parents are too because they see changes in my behavior,” he said. ” I am more disciplined and responsible. My goal is to join the Military, keep learning, and become a great aircraft mechanic.” In addition to teaching aeronautics, the program instills important values. Students graduating from ETAM may choose military tactics at the Captain General Gerardo Barrios Military School and become Cadets after two years. At that time, they have to decide which branch of the Armed Forces to continue with: the Army, Navy, or Air Force. If they are selected by the FAES after passing various aptitude tests, they may request to study at CIMA’s Military Aviation School (EAM), where they will graduate as second lieutenants and continue studying to become professional pilots. In addition to teaching aeronautics, the program instills important values. That’s the goal of Gentleman Cadet Raúl Granados Romero, who is currently in his fourth year in the EAM. His dream is to become a pilot in the Air Force. That’s the goal of Gentleman Cadet Raúl Granados Romero, who is currently in his fourth year in the EAM. His dream is to become a pilot in the Air Force. CIMA graduates are in high demand Hundreds of young people who study aeronautics in high school have been invited to participate at the Salvadorean Air Force (FAES, for its Spanish acronym) Center for Military Aeronautical Training (CIMA, for its Spanish acronym). Through its Technical School for Aviation Mechanics (ETAM), CIMA trains people with significant theoretical knowledge and skills in the fields of Military aviation and aerospace mechanics. last_img

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