Kerala to bring in AntiSuperstition Bill draft bill submitted

first_img More Explained Related News Weather Forecast Today HIGHLIGHTS: Red alert in six Kerala districts, Delhi-NCR wakes up to light rain By PTI |Thiruvananthapuram | Published: July 15, 2019 7:15:20 pm Kerala student stabbing case: 2 SFI leaders arrested, CPM says won’t protect culprits Karnataka trust vote today: Speaker’s call on resignations, says SC, but gives rebel MLAs a shield Post Comment(s) The offenses punishable under this Act shall be “cognisable and non-bailable,” it said.Whoever commits any act in violation, shall on conviction, be sentenced for a term which shall not be less than one year and may extend to seven years and with a fine of Rs 5000 to Rs 50,000, it said.In case of a death of a person, the accused shall be deemed to have committed an offense under Section 300 of the Indian Penal Code (IPC), and shall be punished accordingly, the draft bill added.Further, it said performing any “inhuman” evil act, black magic or sorcery, parading naked or putting a ban on a person’s daily activity or using such alleged practice to extort, threaten or assault a person in search of precious things, are punishable offenses.However, the draft bill clearly states that it would not be applicable to any form of worshipper formed at any religious or spiritual places and the performance of religious rituals at home, temple, church, mosque or other religious places, which do not cause physical harm to any person.All religious celebration, festivals, prayers and processions and the advice with regard to ‘vasthusastra’ or advice by astrologers (unless such advice results in cheating, defrauding or exploiting any person) are also exempted, it said.The Anti-Superstition and Black Magic draft Bill assumes significance in Kerala, which is known for its high literacy rate and progressive outlook, in view of a number of shocking incidents and sinister practices in the name of black magic in the recent days.The death of a 27-year-old woman, from Karunagapally, allegedly due to starvation enforced by her husband and mother-in-law for dowry, had caused widespread public outrage in the state this April.There were allegations that her in-laws had performed black magic on the woman and she was denied proper food for days and survived only on soaked rice and sugar syrup al on the instruction of a black magician.In another incident, bodies of a man and three other members of his family were found stacked one over the other and buried in a pit in the backyard of their house in Kerala’s Idukki district in August last year. The Kerala Prevention and Eradication of Inhuman Evil Practices, Sorcery and Black Magic Bill, 2019 has been submitted to the CPI(M)-led LDF government for its consideration to pass as legislation.On the lines of the Anti-Superstition and Black Magic Bill, passed by Maharashtra and Karnataka, the state-run Kerala Law Reforms Commission has drafted the bill to fight superstition and eradicate “inhuman evil” practices propagated in the name of black magic.The draft bill, accessed by PTI, proposes stringent punishment for any kind of evil practice and cheating in the name of black magic, ranging from “expelling ghost” to isolating women for menstruation and postpartum. It also aims at raising social awareness in the society with a view to protecting people against fraudulent and exploitative practices thriving on ignorance.The legislative assemblies of Karnataka and Maharashtra had passed the Anti-Superstition Black Magic Bill in 2017 and 2013, respectively.“The draft bill is completed and we have submitted it to the state government,” K Sasidharan Nair, Vice Chairman, Kerala Law Reforms Commission, told PTI.“Unlike the bills passed by Maharashtra and Karnataka, we have given special thrust to a series of intense awareness programs in our bill for the government to implement. Because, superstition seems to be so deep-rooted in the minds of Keralite people nowadays,” he said. Police said the man had been practising witchcraft for the past several years and collecting money from local people promising to bring them luck and rid them of evil effects. Kerala, Kerala news, Anti-Superstition Bill in Kerala, Anti-Superstition Bill, Superstition in Kerala, Black magic in Kerala, Indian Express news The state-run Kerala Law Reforms Commission has drafted the bill to fight superstition and eradicate “inhuman evil” practices propagated in the name of black magic. (Representational Image)Kerala, which recently witnessed an alarming spurt in the number of black magic cases, is gearing up to bring in a legislation to curb “inhuman” practices and exploitation in the name of superstition. Advertising Advertising Cabinet asks finance panel to consider securing funds for defence Best Of Express Taking stock of monsoon rain World Bank to offer $250 million to Kerala for disaster management “While going through many instances of superstition, I feel whether we deserve to be called a civilised society? Only a few cases are reported in the media,” Nair, also a former law secretary, said.He said legislation and stringent punishment alone cannot make any changes in the mindset of the people.“As it is a very sensitive topic, we have drafted the bill very carefully. I personally feel that public opinion should be garnered before it is enacted as law by the government,” the vice-chairperson added.According to the draft bill, no person shall by himself or through any other person, promote, propagate or practice, black magic or sorcery. After Masood Azhar blacklisting, more isolation for Pakistan Advertisinglast_img read more

Momentum builds for joint USCuba study of mysterious maladies affecting Havana diplomats

first_img Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Jose Luis Magana/AP Photo Speaking at a press conference on 13 September after meeting with U.S. Department of State officials, Cuban neurophysiologist Mitchell Valdés-Sosa said there is no meeting of the minds on a potential explanation for what sickened U.S. diplomats in Havana. Momentum builds for joint U.S.-Cuba study of mysterious maladies affecting Havana diplomats By Richard StoneSep. 17, 2018 , 2:20 PMcenter_img Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe WASHINGTON, D.C.—Breaking a monthslong impasse, scientists and medical doctors from the United States and Cuba huddled here on 13 September to discuss what the U.S. Department of State has characterized as “health attacks” on some two dozen personnel stationed at the U.S. embassy in Havana, alleged to have occurred since the end of 2016. There was no meeting of the minds on a potential explanation for the diplomats’ symptoms, which included headaches, dizziness, and insomnia after hearing strange noises or feeling a sensation of pressure. But momentum is building for a joint study by the Cuban and U.S. science academies.Two research teams that have evaluated the diplomats assert that the symptoms are real and may have an underlying physical cause. In a report in The Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) in February, Douglas Smith, director of the Center for Brain Injury and Repair at the University of Pennsylvania (UPenn), and co-authors described a “constellation” of symptoms consistent with a concussion that they believe constitutes a new neurological syndrome. And Michael Hoffer, an otolaryngologist at the University of Miami in Florida, and his colleagues have gathered evidence of what they describe as a unique vestibular and cognitive disorder in the diplomats.The cause of the diplomats’ symptoms remains an enigma. In early 2017, when the U.S. embassy in Havana began to investigate the alleged incidents, its working hypothesis was that the victims were targeted by a long-range acoustic device. Hoffer’s team, working with the U.S. Office of Naval Research, is probing whether a directed energy weapon of some sort could have damaged the diplomats’ inner ears. Earlier this month, The New York Times, quoting Smith and others, declared microwaves are a “prime suspect.” Further fueling speculation, communications intercepted by U.S. intelligence agencies implicate Russia in the alleged attacks, NBC News, citing anonymous sources, reported last week. But a Federal Bureau of Investigation probe last year uncovered no proof of an attack; White House Press Secretary Sarah Sanders told CBS News last week that “no determination has been made and the investigation is still ongoing.” Email In late 2017, a Cuban expert panel reported that it had failed to uncover evidence of an attack. It contended that stressful conditions in the embassy community in Havana may have sickened the diplomats. That’s still the likeliest explanation, argues panel member Mitchell Valdés-Sosa, director of the Cuban Neuroscience Center in Havana. “We’re not saying the diplomats were hysterical, but we can’t rule out psychological contagion.”Valdés-Sosa, a neurophysiologist, and eight Cuban colleagues were here last week by invitation from the Department of State to discuss the incidents with Kenneth Merten, acting principal deputy assistant secretary in the Bureau of Western Hemisphere Affairs, several officers from its Bureau of Medical Services, and members of the Department of State’s Health Incidents Response Task Force. In the weekslong leadup to the first face-to-face meeting on the incidents between specialists from the two countries, the Cuban delegation had asked to examine medical data, including brain scans, of the diplomats, and had requested members of the UPenn team to be present to discuss their findings, Valdés-Sosa says. Instead, the State Department medical officials summarized the UPenn findings and said they could not share medical data because of patient confidentiality. The Cuban scientists flagged what they viewed as the study’s shortcomings and challenged its main conclusions. Although the two sides found little common ground, Valdés-Sosa says, “The very fact we engaged is positive.” Nevertheless, he says, with no clinical records to examine together and the JAMA study’s authors not in the room, the Cuban side viewed the encounter “as a wasted opportunity.”The State Department did not comment on Valdés-Sosa’s characterization of the meeting or answer Science’s questions about what State Department spokesperson Julia Mason terms “a general medical briefing about the injuries experienced by U.S. personnel who served in Havana.” “The health and well-being of our personnel remains our top priority,” Mason says.The Cuban scientists spent a day on Capitol Hill as well, meeting with several legislators including Senator Bob Corker (R–TN) and Representative Rick Crawford (R–AR). “We told them that we want this to be depoliticized,” Valdés-Sosa says. And he says they had a particularly fruitful dialogue here with officials at the U.S. National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine (NASEM) here. (The Cuban delegation was led by neurologist Luis Velázquez Pérez, president of the Cuban Academy of Sciences, who had to return to Havana soon after arriving on U.S. soil because of an illness in his family.)Earlier this year, the Cuban academy proposed a joint study with its U.S. counterpart on the alleged attacks. According to Valdés-Sosa, the NASEM officials told the Cubans they are open to such a study if a funder were to materialize. The discussions were “productive,” says Vaughan Turekian, executive director for policy and global affairs at NASEM. “We … appreciated the opportunity to hear their perspectives and learn about their initial analyses,” he says. “As our governments continue their work to better understand the nature of the issue, the U.S. National Academies stand ready to assist, as needed, in mobilizing our experts and expertise.”In the meantime, the Cuban scientists are conducting baseline studies on traumatic brain injury to complement the U.S. data. They are imaging the brains of individuals who suffered brain injuries of varying degrees of severity while playing sports, and comparing the scans to control subjects, says Valdés-Sosa, who says the study should be completed around the end of this year. The Cuban team has invited the U.S. investigators—including the scientists who examined the diplomats—to Havana to further probe the matter.last_img read more

Pills armed with tiny needles could inject insulin other important meds directly

first_img Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Pills armed with tiny needles could inject insulin, other important meds directly into the stomach By Robert F. ServiceFeb. 7, 2019 , 2:00 PM In 1922, a 14-year-old boy in Toronto, Canada, received the first injection of insulin to treat life-threatening diabetes. The same year, researchers began to test oral insulin formulations, hoping to relieve people with diabetes of daily shots. That effort failed, as have dozens of similar attempts. But realistic hope for oral insulin may finally be here. Researchers report in this issue of Science that they’ve engineered a capsule that, once ingested, pokes a tiny hole in the lining of the stomach to deliver insulin or other so-called biologic medicines that can’t be taken by mouth.Other research groups and companies have also made recent progress in delivering once-injected medicines orally, raising hopes that for many patients, painful injections may become a thing of the past. “This field is really at an exciting stage,” says Samir Mitragotri, a biomedical engineer at Harvard University. “I think it’s going to completely transform how patients take drugs.”Optimism has surged before. But the harsh environment of the stomach and intestine has thwarted many attempts to deliver complex, delicate drugs by mouth. “There are a lot of dead bodies in this space,” says Mir Imran, CEO of Rani Therapeutics, a San Jose, California, company working to commercialize oral biologics. “People keep trying because it’s such an important area.” Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Emailcenter_img Alex Abramson/MIT These pills were engineered to drive a tiny needle into the stomach lining. Unlike traditional pharmaceuticals, which are small molecules that the digestive tract easily absorbs, biologics are typically proteins: large, unwieldy molecules produced by microbes or other living cells. Biologics, which include seven of the 10 top selling drugs by sales in the United States, are more likely to hit a target molecule in the body without side effects because of their large size. But they’re also more liable to degrade in the stomach or be blocked from entering the bloodstream by thick layers of mucus and tightly packed epithelial cells that line the stomach and gut. Getting past these defenses “is honestly one of the biggest challenges and holy grails in drug development,” says Carlo Giovanni Traverso, a gastroenterologist and bioengineer at Harvard Medical School in Boston and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in Cambridge.In recent years, pharmaceutical companies have encapsulated several small proteins, called peptides, in chemicals called permeation enhancers that promote absorption by the small intestine. But most permeation enhancers allow less than 1% of peptides to cross into the bloodstream.Mitragotri’s team at Harvard is trying to improve on the approach. He and his colleagues reported in 2018 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences that they encapsulated insulin in a liquid that has the consistency of honey. When the capsule dissolves in the small intestine, the viscous liquid gloms onto the lining and briefly disrupts the lipid membrane of the cells on the surface, allowing the insulin or other drugs to be absorbed. Last week, Mitragotri and his colleagues formed a biotech company to commercialize the technology. Similarly, Oramed Pharmaceuticals, a Jerusalem-based biotech company, is testing insulin capsules containing components that shield the protein from digestive acids and enzymes and promote its absorption in the small intestine.Traverso, with Robert Langer, a drug delivery expert at MIT, and their colleagues turned instead to engineering. They developed a hollow pill with one flattened end. The shape, along with the capsule’s center of mass near the flat end, ensures that the pill rights itself in the stomach, with its flat surface facing the stomach lining. Just inside the pill’s flat end, which is made of sugar, sits a tiny tensed spring topped with a needle made from solid insulin. In the moist stomach, the sugar begins to dissolve, eventually allowing the spring to poke the insulin needle into the outer stomach layer, where it dissolves and enters the bloodstream.In rats and pigs, the pill could deliver essentially the same insulin levels into the blood as a subcutaneous injection. And histology studies showed no signs of lasting damage from daily internal needle punctures.”It’s a very smart design,” says Edith Mathiowitz, a biomedical engineer at Brown University. However, she adds, the team needs to ensure that creating even tiny perforations in the stomach doesn’t pose long-term health problems for patients, and that undesirable proteins or bacteria can’t wiggle their way in alongside the insulin.Rani Therapeutics is banking on similar ingenuity. Instead of a spring, Rani’s pills use a chemical reaction set off by the small intestine’s pH to generate carbon dioxide that inflates a tiny balloon. The balloon presses a needle packed with the drug through the intestinal lining. Although it has not published papers on its pills, Rani has completed more than 100 animal studies. In an initial safety study of pills without needles or drugs, people reported no awareness of the device’s balloon as it inflated, Imran says. This year, he adds, the company plans its first clinical trials of pills loaded with octreotide, a biologic that treats acromegaly, a dangerous enlargement of the face, hands, and feet.It could take years for any of these technologies to complete safety and efficacy studies. But because the engineered pills are intended to work with existing drugs, they could spread rapidly if approved, realizing a century-old goal—and the hopes of countless patients. Click to view the privacy policy. 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South Korea president calls Trump Kim meet an end to mutual hostility

first_img Related News During their third summit at the Korean Demilitarized Zone on Sunday, Trump and Kim agreed to resume nuclear talks. But neither side has indicated they are any closer to resolving sticking points that collapsed their previous summit.On Monday, however, South Korean President Moon Jae-in told a Cabinet meeting that the summit in the DMZ meant the two countries declared “an end of hostile relations” and the “start of an era of peace.”Moon, who briefly chatted with Trump and Kim on a DMZ village before they sat for a two-way meeting, described the Trump-Kim summit as “historic.” He also called the summit “the fruits of amazing indignation,” saying it was arranged due to Trump’s “unprecedented” Twitter offer for a meeting and Kim’s “bold” decision to accept it. Singapore will bear some costs of Donald Trump-Kim Jong Un summit, says Defence Minister Ng Eng Hen US detects new activity at North Korea factory that built intercontinental ballistic missiles By AP |Seoul | Published: July 2, 2019 12:18:34 pm US seizes North Korean ship amid tense moment in relations Advertising Post Comment(s) South Korea's president calls Trump Kim meet an end to mutual hostility President Donald Trump walks with Kim Jong Un, the North Korean leader, on the North Korean side of the Demilitarized Zone (Erin Schaff/The New York Times)South Korea’s president on Monday called a recent U.S.-North Korean summit at the Korean border an end of mutual hostility between the countries, despite skepticism that it’s was a just made-for-TV moment that lacked any substance. Moon, a liberal who took office in 2017, has lobbied hard to set up diplomacy between Trump and Kim to help find a peaceful settlement of the North Korean nuclear crisis. He met Kim three times last year, and their first and second summits happened at the same DMZ village called Panmunjom.During their meeting, Trump went across Panmunjom’s military demarcation line into North Korea, becoming the first sitting American president to step foot in the North’s soil since the end of the 1950-53 Korean War. Trump said he was “proud” to step over the borderline and thanked Kim for showing up for the meeting.North Korea’s state media described Kim’s meeting with Trump as “an amazing event” and that both leaders expressed great satisfaction over the result of their talks. Moon’s government has also said it hopes the diplomatic momentum created by the latest Trump-Kim meeting would help revive inter-Korean dialogue and engagement that stopped amid an impasse in nuclear negotiations between Washington and Pyongyang.The latest Trump-Kim summit may have created a momentum for further diplomacy, including working-level talks aimed at hammering out the terms of a mutually acceptable deal, but many experts say it remains unclear whether the negotiations would successfully address the fundamental differences between Washington and Pyongyang that were exposed in the second Kim-Trump summit in Vietnam in February.The Hanoi summit ended without any agreement after Trump turned down Kim’s request for major sanctions relief in return for dismantling his main nuclear materials-making complex while leaving his already manufactured nuclear bombs and long-range missiles intact. Advertisinglast_img read more

Kartarpur Corridor 54 immigration kiosks seating for 2000 part of passenger complex

first_img Kartarpur Corridor: Punjab CM Amarinder Singh appreciates Pakistan’s move on visa free travel kartarpur corridor, Kartarpur Sahib, Kartarpur Sahib pakistan, Dera Baba Nanak, Kartarpur Sahib passenger terminal, Kartarpur Sahib terminal Kartarpur Sahib (File Photo)The passenger terminal complex for pilgrims to Kartarpur Sahib at Dera Baba Nanak in Punjab will have a fully air-conditioned building of approximately 16000 sqm and will have 54 immigration counters to facilitate the travel of 5000 pilgrims per day. India, Pakistan move closer on Kartarpur corridor, pro-Khalistan leader dropped from panel By Express News Service |Attari | Published: July 15, 2019 4:24:50 am Post Comment(s) Related News According to a government release, the complex will have adequate seating capacity for 2,000 pilgrims and all necessary amenities like washrooms, childcare, first-aid, prayer room and snacks counters will be housed inside the main building.This apart, a spacious parking lot to accommodate 10 buses, 250 cars, and 250 two-wheelers and CCTV cameras are to be put into place.A 300-ft national monumental flag will also be installed at the International Border. Advertising Advertising The government has also envisaged a landscape area with water bodies, artefacts, sculptures of local culture, shaded seating spaces, canopies and benches.Architecture schools at Amritsar have been consulted for the display of the rich Punjabi heritage, the life and works of Shri Guru Nanak Devji in the state-of-art building and for the landscaping of the complex.The government has reiterated that construction work on the Rs 500-crore complex is on in full swing. The target to complete the project is October 31, before the commemoration of the 550th birth anniversary of Sri Guru Nanak Dev in November 2019.Earlier, Punjab minister and MLA from Dera Baba Nanak, Sukhjinder Singh Randhawa, had alleged that work at the site was progressing at a slow pace and may not be completed before the 550th birth anniversary celebrations. Pakistan increases land allotted to Kartarpur Gurdwara from 3 to 42 acres last_img read more

Dalit flogging A year later Una victims want cases to be withdrawn

first_img“As many as 15 people have been convicted and sentenced to three years imprisonment in Upleta taluka of Rajkot district and three others in a similar case in Bhayavadar in Upleta taluka. Cases are pending against Dalits in Shapar-Veraval and Gondal in Rajkot district, in Jamnagar and Amreli districts also. Many cases were filed in Ahmedabad and other districts too. Police have arrested Daltis and jailed them. But those who assaulted us in Mota Samadhiyala are out on bail and are roaming free. We demand that bail of all those accused of assaulting us in Mota Samadhiyala be cancelled,” Vashram told The Indian Express.Vashram said that of the 43 accused in the case, five were in judicial custody and the rest were released on bail.A group of cow vigilantes allegedly assaulted Vashram, his younger brother Ramesh, cousin Ashok and relative Bechar while they were skinning a dead cow in Mota Samadhiyala village in Una taluka of Gir Somnath district on July 11, 2016. The assailants accused the Dalits of slaughtering a cow. When Vashram’s father Balu and mother Kunvar tried to intervene, the accused assaulted them also. They attacked Arjan Babariya and Devshi Babariya, both resident of neighbouring Bediya village and relatives of Sarvaiya.The accused, from the neighbouring villages, then allegedly kidnapped Vashram, Ramesh, Ashok and Bechar in their SUV, took them to Una town and flogged them before abandoning them near Una police station. Videos of the accused beating half-naked Dalits went viral, causing a nation-wide outrage among Dalits. BSP chief Mayawati raised the incident in the Rajya Sabha.Dalits in the state went on protest for around a week that turned violent in many places and cases were filed against several protesters. The Sarvaiyas have been demanding withdrawal of cases for the past three years. A special court in Veraval. district headquarters of Gir Somnath, is scheduled to start hearing the Mota Samadhiyala atrocity case on daily basis from July 29. Una Dalit family says govt failed to keep promises, seeks mercy killing Dangerous situation… social injustice behind this: BJP MP Udit Raj on mass conversion of Dalits in Una Una Dalit victims seek mercy killing, write to President, say ‘government didn’t fulfill promises’ Advertising una, una dalit flogging, una dalits beatenm dalit atrocities, atrocities on dalits, dalits, gujarat news Sarvaiya (extreme left) with his sons last year. (Express Photo: Gopal Kateshiya)ON THE third anniversary of the Una Dalit atrocities case, the victim’s family repeated their demand that state government withdraw cases filed against the community members during the violence in the aftermath of the Una case. By Express News Service |Rajkot | Updated: July 15, 2019 6:05:23 am In a memorandum submitted to the sub-divisional magistrate of Una on July 11, Vashram Sarvaiya, one of the victims, said, “In 2016, people of Scheduled Castes in Mota Samadhiyala village of Una taluka were beaten up publicly by so-called gau rakshaks (cow vigilantes) and were subjected to atrocities by parading them. Rallies were taken out, memorandums were submitted and representations were made at many places in Gujarat as well as in many parts of India by people of Scheduled Castes, demanding immediate legal action against those so-called gau rakshaks and justice for the victims’ family. However, the state government filed false complaints against the protesters and jailed them.”Sarvaiya demanded that the government withdraw the cases filed against the community members in the aftermath of the attack on them on July 11, 2016. “After the atrocities on Dalits in Una, people from (our) community took out rallies and submitted memorandums in support of the victims. We demand that the government withdraw all the false cases filed against those who were part of the agitation. If false cases are not withdrawn against them and are instead sentenced, we Dalits of Mota Samadhiyala village who were subjected to atrocities, will serve such sentences,” the memorandum further said.At least seven cases of rioting and damaging public property as well as assault on police were registered in Saurashtra during the protest against the assault on Dalits in Mota Samadhiyala village. A policeman was killed during the clashes in Amreli and a few Dalits were booked for murder. Advertising Related News Post Comment(s)last_img read more

Panel of human antibodies developed to neutralize black mamba snake toxin

first_imgReviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Oct 3 2018IONTAS Limited (IONTAS), a leader in the discovery and optimisation of fully human antibodies, today announced a collaborative paper published in Nature Communications with the Technical University of Denmark, and the Instituto Clodomiro Picado of the University of Costa Rica describing the development of a panel of human antibodies that neutralise elements of black mamba snake toxin in an in vivo model.Each year, around two million people fall victim to snakebite envenoming, which leads to more than 100,000 deaths and approximately 400,000 cases of severe sequalae, such as amputation. Particularly, impoverished victims living in snake-infested areas of the tropics are at risk, and many bites are left untreated due to the unavailability of safe and effective antivenoms. Snakebite envenoming has recently been introduced on the World Health Organization’s list of neglected tropical diseases due to its high disease burden.Related StoriesNaturally occurring human antibody reveals hidden weakness in influenza virusScorpion venom contains compounds that could help fight Staph and tuberculosis bacteriaBreastmilk antibody necessary to prevent necrotizing enterocolitis in preterm infantsThe “proof of concept” research described in Nature Communications identified key components, including dendrotoxins, in the black mamba’s venom which contribute to venom toxicity. Human antibodies were generated to these dendrotoxins using IONTAS Phage Display Technology and cocktails of IgG-formatted human antibodies were then shown to protect mice from dendrotoxin-mediated neurotoxicity in vivo.Associate Professor Andreas Hougaard Laustsen, Technical University of Denmark, commented: “Current antivenoms are based on plasma-derived animal antibodies, which are effective in neutralising venom toxicity, but are also associated with serious adverse reactions, such as serum sickness, due to their non-human origin. With our work we have laid the first stone on the technological path towards the manufacture of a next-generation fully human antivenom, devoid of such drawbacks.”Professor José María Gutiérrez, Instituto Clodomiro Picado, Universidad de Costa Rica, said: “It is rewarding to see that classic techniques in toxinology and state-of-the-art methodologies of recombinant DNA could be successfully combined to demonstrate clear therapeutic potential. This recombinant antibody approach opens the door to the development of novel tools in the treatment of snakebites.”Dr John McCafferty, Founder and CEO, IONTAS said: “Snake envenomation is a particular burden among the world’s poorest people and the approach to treatment, based on poorly defined animal serum has not changed in decades. IONTAS were motivated to contribute our resources and experience in recombinant antibody technology towards this initial proof-of-concept study. We hope that this report will help encourage funders to support the scientific community and advance the treatment of snakebites using modern antibody engineering methods. Although many challenges remain in the development of safe, efficacious and cost-effective drug cocktails, it is an achievable goal with the ultimate reward of seeing science help improve human lives.” Source:www.iontas.co.uklast_img read more

The Strange Tech Wars of 2019

first_imgThe tech market is defined by its battles: Microsoft vs. IBM; Apple vs. Microsoft; Netscape vs. Microsoft; Google vs. Microsoft. If Microsoft were a person, it likely would have PTSD. Then there was Apple vs. Google, and now the big one is Apple vs. Qualcomm.The screwy thing for me is that Huawei represents a far greater threat to both companies than they represent to each other. In fact, I’m really starting to wonder if Qualcomm isn’t a proxy for Google in this fight, with Apple changing dramatically what its own real goal is.I’ll focus on this battle royal this week, because Apple, which is in a jury trial in San Diego to determine damages to Qualcomm, apparently just attempted to influence the jury (tamper with?) and I just don’t think that is going to end well. Judges aren’t known for being stupid. Plus, I think Apple should be more worried about Huawei than Qualcomm right now anyway.I’ll close with my product of the week: the first flying motorcycle you now can order. Rob Enderle has been an ECT News Network columnist since 2003. His areas of interest include AI, autonomous driving, drones, personal technology, emerging technology, regulation, litigation, M&E, and technology in politics. He has an MBA in human resources, marketing and computer science. He is also a certified management accountant. Enderle currently is president and principal analyst of the Enderle Group, a consultancy that serves the technology industry. He formerly served as a senior research fellow at Giga Information Group and Forrester. Email Rob. Unintended Consequences Jetpack Aviation’s Speeder OK, we are clearly in the world of science fiction, because last week Jetpack Aviation opened up preorders for its diesel/kerosene-powered flying motorcycle, the Speeder.With a ceiling of 15,000 feet and a top speed of 150 mph and four turbojet engines, this thing is wicked cool. It only has 20 minutes of flying time, suggesting that if you are at 15,000 feet and a quarter tank you better like pancakes, because you are about to be one. Currently Huawei is executing far better than Apple is. I say this because it passed Apple in market share, and its market continues to expand, while Apple’s apparently has started to contract. Currently Apple, which once dominated the smartphone market, is lagging behind both Samsung and Huawei.Huawei’s success is largely because it builds a very competitive phone that provides more value than Apple’s iPhone does. Huawei also has developed more strategically, in that it builds both the phones and the switches that enable them, and it prices those switches very competitively.This means that once it gets to critical mass in a market about switches and phones, it could enable unique features that neither its switch nor its phone competitors can match.While both Apple and Huawei have been implementing lock-in strategies (where you capture the customers and keep them away from competitors), Apple focused on end users while Huawei focused on carriers. Since the carriers own their customers in most markets, this could make Huawei unbeatable, were it not for its one huge exposure.That exposure is the Chinese government, which owns a significant part of the company and creates the fear that it eventually will take control and turn it into a spying tool. Although I have seen no evidence that this has happened, the company’s ownership structure implies it could, and that has led the U.S. government to blacklist the firm, not only in the U.S. but across the Western world.However, law enforcement in most Western countries, and particularly in the U.S., isn’t based on whether someone could, or eventually will, break the law, but on whether they have broken it — and it doesn’t look as though Huawei has.We don’t live in a Minority Report world, where you can hold people accountable for what they might do in the future. Huawei has been significantly hampered, but with proper legal help, it should be able to get off the blacklist. That would be a problem both for Apple and Qualcomm. Huawei has its own 5G technology and doesn’t need Qualcomm’s, and the company it is trying to take out appears to be Apple. Apple’s sales have been under pressure, and Apple has stopped reporting sales volume in an apparent attempt to conceal that volume sales are declining and revenue growth is mostly coming from price increases.This is problematic, because there is undoubtedly a high limit to how much Apple can charge for its smartphones and related services. In other words, it can’t increase prices indefinitely, particularly as lower-cost vendors like Huawei continue to underprice it.At some point, Apple’s customers will start to hold on to their phones longer, which appears to be the case now, and eventually jump to another vendor to avoid being on an ever-increasing and noncompetitive price cycle.On top of that, the aggressive hostile actions against Qualcomm have cost the company millions, both in terms of legal costs and in lost iPhone sales, and the firm has been partially blocked from selling phones in China and Germany. As I write this, those blocks likely will be increased.In addition, Huawei, thanks largely to the U.S.’s incessant attacks on the company, has become a hero to the Chinese people, and Apple effectively has been blacklisted in China.If this trend continues, Apple could be locked out of China, the fastest-growing and biggest potential future market, , regardless of what Qualcomm does. That would crater Apple’s valuation and likely force an involuntary CEO change. In fact, I expect that if something doesn’t change, Tim Cook will be gone within 18 months.Apple appears to be getting more and more desperate. The obvious attempt to influence the San Diego jury, which really has an incredibly high risk associated with it, is a case in point. Apple also appears to be behind the FTC challenge against Qualcomm. The FTC eventually will figure out it has been acting against the interests of the nation, particularly given that it has been approached by both the U.S. Defense Department and the Department of Energy on that topic.Granted, the U.S. government does often seem to be at war against itself, but this seems unprecedented. Having Apple on the wrong side of the U.S. Defense Department is, in and of itself, problematic for the company. Apple (Is Qualcomm a Proxy for Google?) Huawei’s Success It is computer-operated, which means little or no training will be needed. (To me, that suggests you want to be watching one of these from a distance.) It even looks good — not like most flying vehicles in development, which are butt ugly.It doesn’t look like the most comfortable thing you could fly, but given the entire 20 minutes largely would be taken up with you saying to yourself “don’t crash, don’t crash, don’t crash, OMG I’m almost out of gas,” I don’t think that will be a huge problem. In fact, the lack of comfort might keep your mind off that whole pancake outcome thing.There is even a commercial-like video of the thing. Granted, it is rendered, which suggests actually getting the product is a couple of years out, but it looks like it also will have the ability to fly autonomously.At just under US$400K, this likely won’t have you trading in your Jet Ski or regular motorcycle anytime soon, but imagine pulling up to a party, campsite or event in this puppy. You’d be an instant celebrity, and $400K is pretty cheap for instant celebrity status.While I think I’ll hold off personally on putting my name on the list to buy one of these, it pretty much floats to the top of my lust list, making the Jetpack Aviation Speeder my product of the week. The opinions expressed in this article are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the views of ECT News Network. Wrapping Up What is very strange about Apple’s obvious attempts to put Qualcomm out of business is its rationale. Qualcomm isn’t a direct competitor. It provides much of the core technology that makes smartphones work — particularly high-end smartphones like the iPhone.What if Qualcomm is a proxy for Google? Google is massively powerful, and Apple’s attempts to carry out Steve Jobs’ wish that Google be punished for violating his trust largely have failed.However, the offending platform, Android, which Apple feels was stolen from it, depends on hardware technology — and the company that provides most of it is Qualcomm. Critical to this is that Qualcomm uses its revenue from licensing to do R&D, and that R&D is mostly carrying the high-end part of the Android platform.If you could cripple that, you likely could reduce the competition for iPhones dramatically. Given that much of that competition is lower-priced, it would take a ton of price pressure off Apple while creating an opportunity — a strong opportunity — for Apple’s expansion.Yet Huawei, as I noted above, doesn’t really need Qualcomm, and Huawei is a bigger threat to Apple than Samsung is, thanks to its position in China, which is the fastest-growing and arguably biggest potential market for smartphones.Qualcomm could be a better defense against Huawei, since its technology significantly exceeds what Apple currently has. Apple is depending on Intel in the short term, and Intel has been running around a year behind Qualcomm. Intel doesn’t have the industry power, and it’s likely that Apple accidentally crippled Intel when it allegedly gave Intel Qualcomm’s technology so Intel could close the 4G/5G technology gap.Qualcomm found out about it, and if Intel is found guilty, it may be knocked out of the cellular modem market. This is the danger when you steal technology; the downside to getting caught is that it can be catastrophic for the thief.All of this benefits Huawei, which has Apple in its sites. Huawei represents a massive threat to U.S. technology dominance. Efforts to brand the company as a bad actor clearly have had an impact, but Huawei has plowed right through them, indicating that if it could get the U.S. to stop, it likely would be unbeatable.Huawei appears to have a strong case for the U.S. to stop, and China could make leaving Huawei alone part of its deal to end the tariff war, which is going really badly for both countries at the moment (and could cost Trump the Presidency).Given that Apple is the aggressor, it really should rethink its battle with Qualcomm/Google and focus on the bigger long-term threats: its inability to increase prices indefinitely; and Huawei/China, which together massively outresource Apple.If something doesn’t change, tech market dominance likely will transition from the U.S. to China, with the Huawei/Apple battle being the harbinger of that change. Hopefully the next CEO at Apple will be able to intervene in time, but I doubt it. last_img read more

Hepatitis Cinfected thoracic organs can be safely transplanted study finds

first_imgReviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Apr 4 2019Infectious diseases experts and transplant physicians and surgeons at Brigham and Women’s Hospital have blocked the transmission of hepatitis C from infected organ donors to recipients in need of hearts or lungs. The DONATE HCV Trial Team reports that hepatitis C-infected thoracic organs can be safely transplanted, detecting no signs of the disease and good outcomes for the transplanted organs in all patients treated with a preemptive, short course of antivirals. In a paper published in the New England Journal of Medicine, the team describes a four-week antiviral treatment regimen started within hours of organ transplantation surgery, preventing establishment of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection in all patients, and, in so doing, expanding the pool of eligible heart and lung donor organs.”There was a 100 percent success rate in terms of HCV treatment and six-month graft survival,” said corresponding author Ann Woolley, MD, MPH, of the Division of Infectious Diseases at the Brigham. “Direct acting antivirals have revolutionized the field of hepatitis C treatment and have also created an opportunity to transplant organs from hepatitis C positive donors. While transplants from hepatitis C positive donors have previously been done, the best approach to doing this — when to initiate treatment and how long to treat patients after transplant — as well as the outcomes for heart and lung transplant recipients have not previously been systematically studied. This is the largest clinical trial to date for HCV thoracic organ transplantation and provides clear evidence that this shortened regimen, initiated within hours of transplant, can prevent the establishment of hepatitis C in the recipients and lead to excellent outcomes for patients.”In their paper, the researchers present data on the 35 patients who had enrolled in the study by February 2018. Each of those 35 patients met the trial’s primary endpoints — all had undetectable hepatitis C viral loads and functioning transplanted organs six months or more after transplant surgery. Given the study’s successful outcomes, enrollment continues and the team has now enrolled a total of 69 participants to date.The team found that nearly all of the patients who received organs from HCV viral load positive donors had evidence of HCV virus immediately post-transplantation. However, very early preemptive treatment prevented HCV from establishing infection, despite the fact that patients were taking high-dose, induction immunosuppressive medications as part of the transplant process. All recipients cleared the virus by about two weeks and hepatitis C viral loads remained undetectable thereafter.”It was critically important to us to determine that this treatment not only prevented transmission of hepatitis C but also didn’t worsen outcomes for our transplant patients,” said co-author Steve Singh, MD, former surgical director of the Heart Transplantation and Mechanical Circulatory Support in the Department of Cardiac Surgery. “Our short-term findings to date suggest that graft survival is just as excellent in patients who were transplanted with thoracic organs from hepatitis C positive donors as it was in those who received thoracic organs from non-hepatitis C positive donors during the same period.”Related StoriesResearchers identify new subtypes of motor neurons and microglia present in ALS patientsUIC researchers aim to find how mining dusts contribute to black lung diseaseOrlando Health ORMC offers new lung valve treatment for patients with severe emphysemaAlthough the number of organ transplants in the U.S. has increased over the last five years, it is estimated that about 1,000 patients die every year waiting for a lung or heart transplant. Drug intoxication deaths have led to a rise in available organs for transplantation, but donor hepatitis C viral infection has been a leading reason that otherwise medically suitable organs are deemed ineligible for transplantation.Direct-acting antivirals, such as sofosbuvir/velpatasvir, are used to treat patients infected with hepatitis C. Standard treatment for people who are chronically infected with hepatitis C is typically 8-to-12 weeks, depending on the treatment regimen used. Other studies have found that it is feasible to treat kidney and liver transplant patients with these drugs early after transplantation, and such treatments are beginning to be used to treat heart and lung transplant recipients. Woolley and colleagues set out to treat a much larger cohort of patients with a shortened course of therapy and collected data on outcomes over a longer period of time.The authors noted the importance of a shorter duration of antiviral treatment leading to successful outcomes for patients.”HCV infection has been a long-standing reason to decline donation of suitable organs,” said co-author Lindsey Baden, MD, director of Clinical Research in the Division of Infectious Diseases at the Brigham. “What the data show is that transmission does occur, but a short, four-week course of antiviral therapy led to rapid HCV clearance. These data demonstrate how preemptive therapy can stop transmission thus decreasing medication burden, drug interactions, and cost.”The team also analyzed safety outcomes, finding that there were no hepatitis C-attributable adverse events. The researchers reported a numerical increase in acute cellular rejection among lung transplant patients, but this trend was not statistically significant.”This study provided a unique opportunity to explore the utilization of thoracic organs from hepatitis C positive donors for transplantation, which to date have been underutilized despite being relatively common in the current donor population,” said co-author Hilary Goldberg, MD, MPH, the medical director of the Lung Transplant Program and the former lead for the Solid Organ Transplant Quality Assurance and Process Improvement Program at the Brigham. “I am very encouraged by the results so far, and the potential that this study may allow us to provide transplantation successfully to the many recipients who might otherwise never have access to it.” Source:https://www.brighamandwomens.orglast_img read more

Britains BT scrubs Chinas Huawei from 4G network

first_imgAlex Younger, head of Britain’s MI6 foreign intelligence agency, had earlier this week warned Huawei poses a potential threat andhad publicly questioned if it should be involved in the 5G platform Britain’s largest mobile provider revealed on Wednesday it was stripping the equipment of China’s telecoms giant Huawei from its core 4G cellular network after similar moves by the United States and New Zealand. Explore further Citation: Britain’s BT scrubs China’s Huawei from 4G network (2018, December 5) retrieved 17 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-12-britain-bt-china-huawei-4g.html © 2018 AFPcenter_img This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. US urging allies to shun Huawei: WSJ BT’s announcement comes with Washington reportedly pushing its allies to shun Huawei equipment and technology as they roll out next-generation 5G platforms.It also follows a warning from the head of Britain’s MI6 foreign intelligence service about the potential threat Huawei poses to national and corporate security.Huawei—one of the world’s largest mobile equipment and service providers—has long been under scrutiny over its allegedly close ties to China’s state intelligence services.Both Beijing and the company deny the link.BT said it has been in the process of removing Huawei equipment from instrumental parts of its 3G and 4G mobile networks since 2016.It said in a statement that the decision was made “as part of network architecture principles in place since 2006″.”We’re applying these same principles to our current RFP (request for proposal) for 5G core infrastructure,” the British group added.”As a result, Huawei have not been included in vendor selection for our 5G core.”‘State or corporate espionage’The Wall Street Journal reported last month that Washington has asked its allies to cut ties with Huawei because its equipment posed strong cybersecurity risks.The pressure is forcing companies and governments to finely balance their positions because of the enormous political and economic influence of both Washington and Beijing.New Zealand’s government last week insisted that it was not banning Huawei from its 5G network rollout because it was Chinese.BT likewise stressed that “Huawei remains an important equipment provider outside the core network, and a valued innovation partner”.It added that Huawei would still be part of its secondary “5G Radio Access Network”.The FT said BT in 2005 became one of the first companies outside China to sign a landmark supply agreement with Huawei.Its decision not to use the Chinese firm for its “core” services came the following year.But it had to resume actively removing Huawei from the 3G and 4G networks used by the EE telecoms company it acquired in 2016.The Wall Street Journal said the UK government is currently reviewing the makeup of its entire telecommunications equipment market.Britain’s MI6 head Alex Younger publicly questioned on Monday whether Huawei should be involved in the 5G platform.”We need to decide the extent to which we are going to be comfortable with Chinese ownership of these technologies and these platforms in an environment where some of our allies have taken a very definite position,” he said in a rare public address.He said a report by a security committee of the US Congress has concluded that China could exert sufficient pressure on companies such as Huawei to achieve strategic security goals.Beijing could “force Chinese suppliers or manufacturers to modify products to perform below expectations or fail, facilitate state or corporate espionage, or otherwise compromise the confidentiality, integrity, or availability,” Younger said.BT used to be known as British Telecom—the government-run provider of fixed line services in the United Kingdom.It changed its name and was privatised between 1991 and 1993. BT reports offering various services in around 180 countries.last_img read more

Apple puts brakes on car team but keeps eye on road

first_img © 2019 AFP Apple acknowledged Thursday that it has trimmed its team devoted to self-driving car technology but stressed that its still in the race. Citation: Apple puts brakes on car team but keeps eye on road (2019, January 24) retrieved 17 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2019-01-apple-car-team-eye-road.html Apple is reorganizing its secretive unit working on autonomous cars but the California giant remains committed to the technology, according to a statement Apple sees autonomous cars as ‘core’ technologycenter_img Explore further Apple’s comment came in response to a CNBC report that the staff of a secretive Project Titan was reduced this week by more than 200 people, some of whom were transferred to jobs elsewhere at the California-based technology group.”We have an incredibly talented team working on autonomous systems and associated technologies at Apple,” the company said in a released statement.”We continue to believe there is a huge opportunity with autonomous systems, that Apple has unique capabilities to contribute, and that this is the most ambitious machine learning project ever.”Apple added a former Tesla executive to a leading role on the self-driving vehicle tech team last year, and the staff cut came with internal reorganization.”As the team focuses their work on several key areas for 2019, some groups are being moved to projects in other parts of the company, where they will support machine learning and other initiatives, across all of Apple,” the statement said.Notoriously tight-lipped Apple revealed its autonomous vehicle technology aspirations late in 2016 in a letter to the US National Highway Traffic Safety Administration offering the company’s opinion about regulations for the sector.Chief executive Tim Cook later said he saw autonomous driving systems as a “core technology” for the future, and that Apple wants to move into the automotive sector because “there is a major disruption looming” from new technologies.Instead of designing and producing a complete self-driving car, the group was to concentrate on developing underlying technologies for autonomous vehicles.Most major auto manufacturers and many technology groups are currently developing autonomous vehicles, considered to be the future of the automobile, along with electric power.The latest move comes as Apple faced pressure to show its fortunes are not tethered solely to iPhone sales. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

Future millimeter wave networks set to deliver the best features of high

first_img More information: Pablo Jimenez Mateo et al. A Comprehensive Study of Low Frequency and High Frequency Channel Correlation In: International Conference on Computing, Networking and Communications (ICNC 2019), 18-21 February 2019, Honolulu, Hawaii, USA. Fig. 1. Angle of arrival (AoA) estimation at Low Frequency (2.45GHz). The set-up includes an antenna array of 4 elements. We use the algorithm MUSIC in order to estimate the AoA of the signal received. Credit: © IMDEA Networks Institute Explore further Provided by IMDEA Networks Institute Dr. Joerg Widmer, the Principal Investigator on the project and Research Director at IMDEA Networks, describes the challenge his group tackled. “A signal’s path loss increases significantly with its frequency. So, High Frequency (HF) communications, like millimeter wave systems which offer the speed and capacity that 5G and 802.11ad-standard Wi-Fi networks require, demand directional antennas in order to overcome the resulting attenuation. This results in high signaling overheads, since both ends of the communication have to continuously update their antenna steering as nodes move and blockages interrupt the line-of-sight path. These problems are avoided in low frequency (LF) networks, with their rich multi-path environment and much lower attenuation rates.””We’ve explored how to use low frequency bands to infer the channel characteristics of high frequency millimeter-wave bands and to support the network in terms of beam tracking, angle of arrival estimation, and location information. By studying this approach and other LF-HF channel correlations that may enable LF to assist HF, we’ve been able to develop techniques that improve performance in the millimeter-wave band and reduce the control overhead required to operate the network. We demonstrated that the mechanisms and algorithms we developed work not only in theory but also in real-world wireless networking environments during the experimental evaluation phase of the project.”Widmer is clear about the significance of the project. “To my knowledge, this was the first time that these two systems have been studied together, in depth. Our team of experts achieved some really interesting results, developing techniques that will enable operators to improve their performance in the millimeter-wave band and thereby reduce the control overhead they require to operate their present and future networks. Our work has already resulted in two patent applications, with a third currently being evaluated for viability.” This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Fig. 2. Angle profile correlation depending on the number of antennas used (16 antennas in this figure). Credit: © IMDEA Networks Institute Fig. 3. Angle profiles for LF and HF. The graph shows the intensity of signal received depending of the angle for each point. Also, it is included the correlation between the angle profiles at the two frequency bands under study. Credit: © IMDEA Networks Institutecenter_img “One of the most important challenges was to study the channel correlation that may enable LF to assist HF,” continues Widmer. “We had to consider a lot of variables in this study, such as the scenarios, power, and delay of the signal, number of paths, and the number of antennas of each system. The IMDEA Networks team was comprised of researchers with backgrounds in math, programming languages, material physics, radio frequency propagation and communication standards. The application of this diversity of expert knowledge, with the wealth of technical resources at our disposal, all helped to ensure our success in achieving our goals for this project.” Project delivers low-cost future network architecture for mobile operators Fig. 2. Angle profile correlation depending on the number of antennas used (16 antennas in this figure). Credit: © IMDEA Networks Institute Fig. 3. Angle profiles for LF and HF. The graph shows the intensity of signal received depending of the angle for each point. Also, it is included the correlation between the angle profiles at the two frequency bands under study. Credit: © IMDEA Networks Institute Citation: Future millimeter wave networks set to deliver the best features of high and low frequencies (2019, April 23) retrieved 17 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2019-04-future-millimeter-networks-features-high.html Future high-speed communication networks based on millimeter-wave (30-300GHz) technology will be more robust and efficient in delivering extremely high speed, high quality video, and multimedia content and services thanks to the results of a ground-breaking research project. The recently-concluded project was a collaboration between Huawei Technologies and IMDEA Networks Institute, the Madrid-based research body pioneering many technologies that are being deployed in the new 5G landscape.last_img read more

Missing Interstellar Iron May Just Be Good at Hiding

first_img Originally published on Live Science.by Taboolaby TaboolaSponsored LinksSponsored LinksPromoted LinksPromoted LinksYou May LikeVikings: Free Online GamePlay this for 1 min and see why everyone is addicted!Vikings: Free Online GameUndoTruthFinder People Search SubscriptionOne Thing All Liars Have in Common, Brace YourselfTruthFinder People Search SubscriptionUndohear.comThese German hearing aids are going viralhear.comUndoGundry MD Total Restore SupplementU.S. Cardiologist: It’s Like a Pressure Wash for Your InsidesGundry MD Total Restore SupplementUndoKelley Blue Book2019 Lexus Vehicles Worth Buying for Their Resale ValueKelley Blue BookUndoFinance DailySeniors With No Life Insurance May Get Up To $250,000 If They Do This…Finance DailyUndo In Images: Rising ‘Phoenix’ Aurora and Starburst Galaxies Light Up the Skies Interstellar space should be filled with iron — one of the most common elements in the universe — but scientists have detected only very low amounts of it to date. Now, a new study suggests iron may not be missing, but just really good at hiding. A group of researchers proposes that interstellar iron combines with a certain type of carbon chain to form molecules called iron pseudocarbynes. But because these iron pseudocarbynes register the same signature as carbon molecules on scientists’ detection devices, the sneaky iron remained hidden, according to a statement from Arizona State University (ASU). “We are proposing a new class of molecules that are likely to be widespread in the interstellar medium,” lead author Pilarisetty Tarakeshwar, research associate professor at ASU’s School of Molecular Sciences said in the statement.Headbutting Tiny Worms Are Really, Really LoudThis rapid strike produces a loud ‘pop’ comparable to those made by snapping shrimps, one of the most intense biological sounds measured at sea.Your Recommended PlaylistVolume 0%Press shift question mark to access a list of keyboard shortcutsKeyboard Shortcutsplay/pauseincrease volumedecrease volumeseek forwardsseek backwardstoggle captionstoggle fullscreenmute/unmuteseek to %SPACE↑↓→←cfm0-9接下来播放Why Is It ‘Snowing’ Salt in the Dead Sea?01:53 facebook twitter 发邮件 reddit 链接https://www.livescience.com/65913-missing-interstellar-iron-found.html?jwsource=cl已复制直播00:0000:3500:35  In the extremely cold temperatures of interstellar space, carbon chains might condense onto iron clusters to form these iron pseudocarbynes, they reported. Over billions of years, the iron pseudocarbynes would combine with other elements and form even more complex molecules. Tarakeshar and his team examined the structure and properties of these molecules in the lab. They used infrared spectroscopy to look at the molecule’s signature spectra, or the pattern of light that gets reflected off from them. “We calculated what the spectra of these molecules would look like, and we found that they have spectroscopic signatures nearly identical to carbon-chain molecules without any iron,” Tarakeshar said. “Previous astrophysical observations could have overlooked these carbon-plus-iron molecules.” What’s more, the iron pseudocarbynes might explain how complex molecules of carbon exist in interstellar space. Carbon chains of more than nine atoms of carbon are unstable, according to the statement. But these iron clusters might be sticking onto them and stabilizing them with their grip. The findings were published on June 26 in the Astrophysical Journal. 15 Amazing Images of Stars 11 Fascinating Facts About Our Milky Way Galaxylast_img read more

Modern Humans Failed in Early Attempt to Migrate Out of Africa Old

first_img In Photos: Bones from a Denisovan-Neanderthal Hybrid This is the oldest known modern human skull in Eurasia, dating to about 210,000 years ago. Here, you can see the partial skull (right), its virtual reconstruction (middle) and a virtual side view. Credit: Copyright Katerina Harvati/Eberhard Karls University of Tübingen A prehistoric, broken skull is revealing the secrets of ancient humans, divulging that early modern humans left Africa much earlier than previously thought, a new study finds. The skull, found in Eurasia and dating back 210,000 years, is the oldest modern human bone that anthropologists have discovered outside Africa, the researchers said. This skull, however, had an unusual neighbor: a 170,000-year-old, possibly Neanderthal skull that was found resting next to it, in a cave in southern Greece. Given that the Neanderthal skull is a solid 40,000 years younger than the modern human skull, it appears that this particular human’s early dispersal out of Africa failed. There are no living descendants of this enigmatic human alive today, and this person’s group was replaced by Neanderthals, who later lived in that very same cave, the researchers said. [Photos: See the Ancient Faces of a Man-Bun-Wearing Bloke and a Neanderthal Woman]Headbutting Tiny Worms Are Really, Really LoudThis rapid strike produces a loud ‘pop’ comparable to those made by snapping shrimps, one of the most intense biological sounds measured at sea.Your Recommended PlaylistVolume 0%Press shift question mark to access a list of keyboard shortcutsKeyboard Shortcutsplay/pauseincrease volumedecrease volumeseek forwardsseek backwardstoggle captionstoggle fullscreenmute/unmuteseek to %SPACE↑↓→←cfm0-9接下来播放Why Is It ‘Snowing’ Salt in the Dead Sea?01:53 facebook twitter 发邮件 reddit 链接https://www.livescience.com/65906-oldest-modern-human-skull-eurasia.html?jwsource=cl已复制直播00:0000:3500:35  “We know from the genetic evidence that all humans that are alive today outside of Africa can trace their ancestry to the major dispersal out of Africa that happened between 70[,000] and 50,000 years before present,” study lead researcher Katerina Harvati, a professor of paleoanthropology at the University of Tübingen in Germany, told reporters at a news conference. Other earlier modern-human dispersals out of Africa have been documented at sites in Israel, including one based on the discovery of a 194,000- to 177,000-year-old modern human jaw from Misliya Cave and others tied to early human fossils dated to about 130,000 to 90,000 years ago at the Skhul and Qafzeh caves. But “we think that these early migrants did not actually contribute to modern humans living outside of Africa today, but rather died out and were probably locally replaced by Neanderthals,” Harvati said. “We hypothesize this is a similar situation with the Apidima 1 [the newly dated modern human skull] population.” Photos: Looking for Extinct Humans in Ancient Cave Mud Discovery in Greece The two ancient skulls were unearthed in the late 1970s by researchers at the Museum of Anthropology at the University of Athens. Given that the skulls were found in Apidima Cave, the researchers named them Apidima 1 and Apidima 2. Both skulls, neither of which had a lower jaw, were found side by side in a block of breccia, angular pieces of rock that were cemented together over time. However, neither skull was in good shape; the damaged Apidima 1 included only the back of the skull, and at the time, researchers weren’t sure what species it came from. Apidima 2, which preserved the facial region of the skull, was identified as Neanderthal, but it was broken and distorted. For years, the skulls sat at the Museum of Anthropology in Athens until they were finally cleaned and prepared from the breccia block in the late 1990s and early 2000s. In the new study, Harvati and her colleagues put both skulls in a CT scanner, which generated 3D virtual reconstructions of each specimen. Then, they analyzed the features of each. As in previous analyses, the team concluded that Apidima 2, which had a thick, rounded brow ridge, was from an early Neanderthal. Identifying Apidima 1 was more challenging because of its fragmentary remains, but the researchers were able to create mirror images of its right and left sides, which gave them a more complete reconstruction. [In Photos: Oldest Homo Sapiens Fossils Ever Found] Several clues, such as the rounded back of the skull (a feature unique to modern humans), indicated that Apidima 1 was an early modern human, or Homo sapiens, the researchers said. Dating the skulls Next, the researchers dated the skulls. Previous analyses had estimated that the skulls were roughly from the same time period, given that they were discovered next to each other, suggesting that they lived around the same time. But by using a method known as uranium-series dating, the new team found that the skulls were not from the same time period. At 170,000 years old, the Neanderthal skull fit within the range of other Neanderthal remains found in other parts of Europe. But the modern human skull was an unexpected outlier, predating the next-oldest H. sapiens remains in Europe by more than 150,000 years, the researchers found. Uranium-series dating is one of only a few ways to date such ancient bones, “but it’s not without some pitfalls,” said Larry Edwards, regents professor in the Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences at the University of Minnesota, who was not involved in the study. In effect, the method works because uranium decays into thorium. The more thorium there is in a sample, the older it is, Edwards told Live Science. However, bones and teeth don’t contain much of their own uranium; rather, they absorb it from the environment over time. “That then requires you to make interpretations on how and when the uranium was picked up and whether or not the uranium was lost,” he said. But although this technique isn’t ideal for dating skulls such as Apidima 1 and 2, it can still provide useful data, Edwards said. “I think it’s pretty solid, their [dating] conclusions,” he said. Out-of-Africa implications Despite the skull’s title as the “oldest known modern human fossil in Eurasia,” the new finding does not rewrite the fundamentals of human evolution, said Eleanor Scerri, an associate professor and leader of the Pan-African Evolution research group at the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History in Jena, Germany, who was not involved in the study. Those fundamentals are that humans first evolved in Africa and then ventured out into the rest of the world. “The oldest human fossils still come from Africa and are about 100,000 years older than the Apidima fossil,” Scerri told Live Science in an email. “That is roughly 4,000 generations — ample opportunity to move around.” That said, “if we want to ask questions specifically about the early history of our species in Eurasia, then this study may confirm the arguments made for multiple, early dispersals,” Scerri said. In addition, this finding supports the view that the population of “early Homo sapiens was fragmented and dispersed,” she said. [Top 10 Mysteries of the First Humans] Previous studies have suggested that “Homo sapiens left Africa every time the Saharan and Arabian deserts shrunk, which happened broadly on 100,000-year cycles,” roughly agreeing with dates from this study, she noted. What’s more, if modern humans truly had reached Eurasia by at least 210,000 years ago, then “we can no longer assume that ‘Mousterian’ stone tool assemblages found across large regions of Eurasia are necessarily being produced by Neanderthals,” she said. There are many avenues open to researchers hoping to learn more about the Apidima skulls. For instance, the skulls could contain ancient DNA or primordial proteins that could verify their species, Eric Delson, who was not involved with the research, wrote in an accompanying perspective published online today (July 10) in the journal Nature. Delson is a professor and the chair of the Department of Anthropology at Lehman College and The Graduate Center at the City University of New York. Moreover, researchers could study the cave’s paleo-environment and climate to figure out what conditions were like when Apidima 1 and 2 lived there. Today, the cave is on a cliff facing the sea, reachable only by boat, Harvati said. The study was published online today in the journal Nature. Photos: Newfound Ancient Human Relative Discovered in Philippines Originally published on Live Science.by Taboolaby TaboolaSponsored LinksSponsored LinksPromoted LinksPromoted LinksYou May LikeVikings: Free Online GamePlay this for 1 minute and see why everyone is addictedVikings: Free Online GameUndohear.comThese German hearing aids are going viralhear.comUndoTruthFinder People Search SubscriptionOne Thing All Liars Have in Common, Brace YourselfTruthFinder People Search SubscriptionUndoGundry MD Total Restore SupplementU.S. Cardiologist: It’s Like a Pressure Wash for Your InsidesGundry MD Total Restore SupplementUndoKelley Blue Book2019 Lexus Vehicles Worth Buying for Their Resale ValueKelley Blue BookUndoLivestlyThe List Of Dog Breeds To Avoid At All CostsLivestlyUndolast_img read more

Sivaganga a highprofile constituency that cries for development

first_imgPublished on COMMENTS Elections 2019 Tamil Nadu SHARE SHARE EMAIL April 12, 2019 SHARE COMMENT Sivaganga constituency in southern Tamil Nadu draws attention in every election. It is from where P Chidambaram, former Union Finance Minister and Congress leader, has been elected seven times..With more than 14lakh voters, the constituency comprises six Legislative Assembly segments, and is witnessing a fierce contest between Chidambaram’s son Karti and H Raja of the BJP..Raja, national secretary of the BJP, is trying his luck from here for the third time, while this is the second election for Karti Chidambaram of the Congress. Both are in search of their maiden victory. In the 1999 Lok Sabha election, Raja came second, polling about 24,000 votes lesser than the winner from the Congress. P Chidambaram, who was then part of Tamil Manila Congress, secured the third position and his votes were less by 95,000 when compared with Raja.In 2014, the AIADMK, which contested alone, won. The DMK was the runner up. Raja, who came third, secured about 1.34 lakh votes when compared with 1.05 lakh garnered by Karti on behalf of the Congress, which contested without an alliance.But this time, both Raja and Karti, who are sons of the soil, are part of big alliances on their respective sides.Sivaganga constituency is facing many issues such as water scarcity, infrastructure development and lack of jobs.“While rainfall was poor and that has left most of the ponds and water tanks in the district dry, cyclone Gaja caused severe damage in Pudukkottai district. We are facing severe water shortage this time,” says D Selvaraj, a farmer from Arimalam village.People in several villages near Pudukkottai and Sivaganga blame the political parties and government officials for not doing anything to desilt water bodies in order to improve storage levels. Roads in Karaikudi and Pudukkottai are in poor condition.Though Karaikudi has Alagappa University, students graduating from the institution have to move to other locations in search of jobs. No industrial project has come to this area despite the availability of barren lands.While Raja is known for his hardcore Hindutva style of politics, people are disappointed with the performance of P Chidambaram and Karti Chidambaram, for not working adequately for the constituency. But, the big vote banks of Dravidian parties — the AIADMK and the DMK — are a plus for the respective candidates this time. While Raja is blaming Chidambaram for not developing the constituency, Karti preferred to portray the election as a means to remove the ‘fascist’ BJP government.However, the TTV Dhinakaran-led Amma Makkal Munnetra Kazhagam (AMMK) may play a spoilsport. If AMMK splits the AIADMK votes, it is likely to help the DMK. Also, since the AMMK has roped in Muslim political outfit the Social Democratic Party of India (SDBI), there could be a split in votes of Muslims too, which may cut into Karti’s vote share.Both Raja and Karti dismiss those arguments and hope for their first victory.last_img read more

Congress must find a new president at the earliest says Scindia

first_img COMMENT SHARE SHARE EMAIL SHARE This is a serious time for the Congress, he said Congress leader Jyotiraditya Scindia on Thursday said that the party needs to “reinvent” itself and stressed on finding a new president “at the earliest”.“We had never imagined that Rahul Gandhi, who not only led the Congress but also the country’s people, would leave his post. This is a serious time for the Congress,” Scindia told reporters in reply to a question here.New leadership The former union minister said efforts to persuade Gandhi to continue leading the party had failed. “Our effort was to convince Rahulji to continue. But, Rahulji remains firm on whatever decision he takes and I am proud of that. We have to search a new party president. A lot of time has elapsed. Now, we cannot allow more time to pass,” said Scindia, who himself lost the Lok Sabha election from his traditional seat Guna in Madhya Pradesh.Scindia said the decision on a new Congress chief should be taken “at the earliest” and opportunity given to a leader who can infuse a new energy into the party.Asked about his name figuring in the race for AICC president, Scindia said, “Deciding about the party president would be a collective decision. The Congress Working Committee would take a decision. We all have to take a decision together,” he said.Asked about the future role of Gandhi, Scindia said, “Rahul ji will decide his own role. The Congress party wanted to see him as party president but his decision has also to be respected.”Time to ‘reinvent’ On the way forward for the country’s oldest political party, Scindia, who had resigned as AICC General Secretary citing accountability, said the Congress now needs to reinvent and revive itself. “A time comes when every organisation needs to reinvent and reinvigorate itself and this time has come for the Congress. We must win faith, love and blessings of the people of the country.”Before talking to reporters in the Vidhan Sabha premises, Scindia watched the proceedings of the state assembly, which is having its monsoon session, for about an hour from the speakers gallery. Published on Jyotiraditya Scindia, Congress leader (File photo)center_img July 11, 2019 politics Indian National Congress COMMENTSlast_img read more

Grappling with urban exodus and GST Kalamkari hub faces a fast fadeoutGrappling

first_imgAndhra Pradesh SHARE SHARE EMAIL May 16, 2019 RELATED textile and clothing (industry) 0 Against 30% in 2011, just 5% of Pedana villagers are now engaged in handloom small scale industry Published on SHARE COMMENT Six yards and a twist The streets are narrow and empty. Most homes appear shut, except a few where you find weavers and artisans working meticulously, stealing an occasional glance at passersby.Pedana, a village in Andhra Pradesh’s Krishna district, known for handloom weavers and Kalamkari specialists for the past four centuries, has lost the exuberance that it held as recently as 10 years ago.“About a decade ago, there were 10,000 handlooms here, but now there are hardly 1,500,” Joganda Rao, the only handloom weaver who operates a shed now, with 30 looms, told BusinessLine. The others are individual single-loom operators. Apart from a weaver, each looms indirectly supports at least four other workers for various related functions. Pedana, a municipality with 17 wards, has a population of about 31,000, according to Census 2011. This means that from about 30 per cent of the total population, the number of weavers has dropped to a little over 5 per cent now.“You should probe this further and ensure help rather than merely writing about it,” said Rao, an unmistakable streak of irritation in his voice.The weaves of Pedana had travelled to global shores in the 16th and 17th centuries, when the Machilipatnam port was flourishing under Qutub Shahi rule at Golconda. It was also a favourite of European trading companies. Multiple challengesThe challenges today are several, an interaction with the villagers revealed. These include the poor availability of formal credit, the lure of taking up screen-printing for a quick buck, and the migration of the youth to urban areas in search of jobs.Pitchika Srinivas, a manufacturer of natural colour handblock-printed Kalamkari, another traditional art of Pedana, rues the exodus of workers from the handblock technique to automated screen-printing. “Problems have increased manifold for Kalamkari exports after the introduction of GST,” he said. “We are not eligible for input tax credit. Since June 2018, incentives such as Rebate on State Levies (ROSL) have been pending.”The imposition of 5 per cent GST on handlooms and Kalamkaris is resulting in losses for the weavers, further weaning them away from their traditional craft, said industry watchers. Both handlooms and Kalamkari are on the decline; this should be stopped to protect the rich historical and business legacy of Pedana, observed Srinivas. Textile Ministry provides Rs 1,972 cr as subsidy under tech upgrade fund GST A Kalamkari artisan at work in Pedana village (file photo)   –  THE HINDU COMMENTSlast_img read more

Pi Datacenters setting up facility in Kochi

first_imgSHARE computing and information technology COMMENT Published on SHARE SHARE EMAILcenter_img July 07, 2019 Pi Datacenters, a data centre and enterprise cloud organisation, is setting up Pi-Kochi, Kerala’s first Uptime Institute Tier-4 certified datacentre, in Infopark.This will be the company’s second facility in India, with the company’s flagship data centre and Asia’s largest Uptime Institute TIER IV certified facility based in Amravati, Andhra Pradesh.The Pi-Kochi project was launched in the presence of M Sivasankar, Secretary IT; S Suhas, District Collector of Ernakulam, and Hrishikesh Nair, CEO, Kerala IT Parks.The modern, greenfield datacentre is being set up in Infopark Phase 2, at a planned investment of Rs 400 crore. Pi-Kochi is slated to be a world-class facility with innovation as key, and is expected to be fully operational by March 2020.Driven by the vision to cater to the digital needs of the nation, Pi Kochi is envisaged as a one-stop shop for all the IT infrastructure needs of enterprises across verticals, in the government, public and private sectors. The data centre would address the growing demand for a high quality, optimal cost data centre and cloud services in the country,” said Kalyan Muppaneni, Founder and CEO, Pi Datacenters.“We plan to generate direct employment for up to 300 qualified professionals and promote indirect employment for more than 1,000 individuals in Kerala. With the highly dynamic and experienced individuals at the helm of Pi Datacenters, Pi Kochi will grow to be a leader in the data centre and cloud space. Pi Kochi will raise the credibility, standard and profile of Infopark” said Geo Kurian, Director & Head – Kerala, Pi-Kochi. COMMENTSlast_img read more

Perak MCA Stop saying Paul Yong is innocent

first_img Nation 11 Jul 2019 Perak exco member Paul Yong back to work on Friday, says aide (updated) {{category}} {{time}} {{title}} “There have been many who have voiced out for Yong, but has there been anyone who voiced out for the maid?” she added.It was reported that a police report was lodged against Yong by the maid, alleging rape.Ting said the people should show support and encouragement for rape victims, especially those with lower social and financial status.”Do not shame or blame the rape victims because even if it’s an indirect participation, your hands will be as dirty,” she said.Related stories:Case probed under rape, Perak exco member out on bailPerak exco member Paul Yong says shocked and baffled by rape allegationSuspend implicated Perak exco man until rape investigation complete, says Perak PAS YouthRape accused maintains innocenceWanita MCA: Paul Yong must go on leave or be suspendedLGE: Any action in Paul Yong rape allegation to be taken after police probePerak exco member Paul Yong back to work on Friday, says aide (updated)Perak exco man may be asked to take leave if probe drags on, says MB‘Yong may be asked to go on leave’MCA calls for exco member’s suspension, Umno wants a fair probeI’ve done nothing wrong – Perak exco member Paul Yong clocks in IPOH: The people should stop saying state executive council member Paul Yong Choo Kiong is innocent because public opinion will affect the ongoing investigation into the sexual assault case.Perak MCA Bahasa Malaysia bureau chairman Cally Ting said this was not fair on the 23-year-old Indonesian maid who alleged she was raped by Yong.”There are parties saying that Yong is not guilty, so are they calling the maid a liar?” she asked.”This is still a 50-50% case. We are still not sure whether it really happened or not,” she told a press conference here on Friday (July 12). Related News Nation 10 Jul 2019 Perak exco member Paul Yong says shocked and baffled by rape allegationcenter_img Nation 2d ago I’ve done nothing wrong – Perak exco member Paul Yong clocks in Tags / Keywords: Related News Paul Yong , Rape , Crime , MCA , Politicslast_img read more

US mum arrested after sharing clip of daughter licking clinic tongue depressor

first_img {{category}} {{time}} {{title}} Nation 08 Jul 2019 ‘Sex video probe still ongoing’ Tech News 08 Jul 2019 US police issue warning on ‘ice cream challenge’ after making another arrest A 30-year-old US mum has been arrested for recording and sharing a clip showing her daughter licking a tongue depressor and putting it back into a container at the doctor’s office. According to US news website News4Jax, the video was recorded on Tuesday (July 9) at the All About Kids & Families Medical Centre in Jacksonville, Florida.The woman identified as Cori Ward had originally uploaded the video onto Snapchat and her account was set to private. She claimed to have only 20 followers, but that did not stop the video from being copied and then shared onto other social media platforms.A police investigation was then initiated after the medical centre discovered the clip. Snapchat , Ice Cream Challenge , Viral Video , Social media Related News In an interview with News4Jax, Ward said she was “just being silly” with her children after waiting for a long time at the clinic. Her daughter who was recorded in the video is underage. The incriminating video also included an on-screen caption that said “Don’t tell me how to live my life”. “It’s ruined my life right now. That’s how I feel at least. I just care about my kids and how this is going to affect them,” she told News4Jax.Ward will be looking at a possible felony charge of tampering with a consumer product without regard for possible death or bodily injury. If convicted, she could end up spending up to 30 years in prison and paying a US$10,000 (RM41,130) fine. A crime and safety expert, Ken Jefferson, told News4Jax believes that US police are looking to make a serious statement with Ward’s arrest.”Simply because of all of the communicable diseases that can be floating around by virtue of this kind of act. I think the message is loud and clear, if this sort of thing continues to go on, they’re going to continue to make arrests.”The medical centre involved said it taken important measures to remove and resanitise all material in the exam room. “This type of behaviour is not tolerated at All About Kids and Families Medical Center. Each year, we serve thousands of patients, and providing quality care and ensuring their safety is our top priority,” it said in a statement.Recently, a string of videos depicting the act of tampering with products such as licking ice cream and putting it back on the supermarket shelves have gone viral on social media. US police have warned others against taking part in the so-called ‘ice cream challenge’.  Tags / Keywords: Another day, another ‘licking items and putting it back where it came from’ video menace. This time, a US mum landed herself in trouble after uploading a video to Snapchat showing her daughter licking a tongue depressor and putting it back at the doctor’s office. — Screengrab from News4Jax video Nation 10 Jul 2019 Man in viral paedophile video did not surrender, was nabbed near Gopeng Related Newslast_img read more