BMW Volkswagen Are 1 And 2 In PlugIn Car Sales In Europe

Nissan LEAF Leads Norway Car Sales In August Source: Electric Vehicle News Almost 7% Of BMW Group Car Sales Plugged In: August 2018 BMW Group currently sells the most plug-in electric cars in Europe.Nissan, Renault and Tesla sold the most all-electric cars in Europe during the first eight months of the year, according to research by AID analyst Matthias Schmidt (SchmidtMatthias.de).However, if we include plug-in hybrids, there is no competition for BMW Group (BMW & MINI brands) and Volkswagen Group (Audi, Porsche, Volkswagen). Those two already sold between 40,000 to 45,000 units each through the end of August in 2018, including less than 15,000 BEVs. BMW is slightly above Volkswagen, but the BEV/PHEV proportions seem close to the same.See Also As you can see in the graph below, big progress was achieved by Hyundai Group (Hyundai & Kia) too, which seems to be in fourth place.Far, far behind is hybrid-tycoon Toyota, which plays the game these days by suggesting it has no interest in plug-ins.BMW Group sold the most plug-in passenger cars in W-Europe during the opening 8-months of the year according to @AIDNewsletter data and https://t.co/9qMZNuIPzf research, accounting for 7% of their total sales in the region.@VWgroup were just behind with 43k sales pic.twitter.com/29NlmgCd8N— Matthias Schmidt (@auto_schmidt) September 25, 2018 Nissan LEAF Sales In Europe Dip Below 2,500 In August 2018 Author Liberty Access TechnologiesPosted on September 26, 2018Categories Electric Vehicle News read more

Whats It Like To Drive 900 Miles In A Hyundai Nexo Hydrogen

first_imgWith more than 300 miles of range on a tank and 5-minute refuel, it could be a perfect zero-emission car. However, there are only 36 hydrogen stations in California (not even talking about the hydrogen desert in other states). Furthermore, the gap between them sometimes forces one to change the route. That was the case in the review and likely in real life, too.“In some alternate reality, it’s not electric cars replacing gas-guzzlers on the nation’s highways, but hydrogen fuel cell vehicles. I recently got a glimpse of that alternate timeline, spending five days behind the wheel of Hyundai’s newest hydrogen car, the NEXO. My co-pilot: Joshua Vergara of JVTechTea. My mission? A 900-mile road trip from San Diego to Sacramento using nothing but hydrogen … and leaving nothing but water behind. Spoiler alert: we accomplished our mission, but not exactly the way we’d planned. Join Joshua Vergara and MrMobile for the Hyundai NEXO Review!”The other thing is that the cost of refueling was always above $80. NEXO can store up to 6.3 kg of hydrogen and if 1 kg cost more than $16, then, of course, it’s expensive to run. Combined with a price tag between $58,300 and $61,800, the NEXO will not be able to compete with electric cars at similar prices. Those cars have a solid fast-charging infrastructure and a much lower energy cost per mile.Separate relation from the trip by Joshua Vergara:For almost an entire week, MrMobile (Michael Fisher) and I spent time in a car basically from the future – the Hyundai NEXO. With all of the bells and whistles you could want in a road trip vehicle, our trip was propelled by a still new alternative fuel source: hydrogen. See how our journey unfolded on this trip from San Diego to Napa Valley wine country!.embed-container { position: relative; padding-bottom: 56.25%; height: 0; overflow: hidden; max-width: 100%; } .embed-container iframe, .embed-container object, .embed-container embed { position: absolute; top: 0; left: 0; width: 100%; height: 100%; }Hyundai Nexo specs:about 370 miles (595 km)0-60 mph in 9.5 seconds120 kW and 395 Nm electric motorfuel cell is able to provide around 95 kW of power, together with 40 kW from the battery. A total output of 135 kW is available The Fast Lane Car Check Outs Hyundai Kona Electric & Nexo Source: Electric Vehicle News Euro NCAP Award 5 Stars To First Hydrogen Fuel Cell Car Ever Tested Author Liberty Access TechnologiesPosted on December 25, 2018Categories Electric Vehicle News In a single word … expensive. In two words … expensive and difficult.It seems the lack of a hydrogen infrastructure limits the Hyundai NEXO capabilities.In a joint review of the Hyundai NEXO, Mr. Mobile [Michael Fisher] and Joshua Vergara, drove the car 900 miles (1,450 km) from San Diego to Sacramento over five days.The NEXO made a good impression and was considered the best hydrogen fuel cell model so far. (better than Toyota Mirai) It’s got great features and comfort.Hyundai NEXO news Hyundai’s Hydrogen-Powered Nexo SUV Priced From Nearly $60Klast_img read more

This Hyundai Kona Electric Review Entertains Educates

first_img Hyundai Kona Electric Buries Chevy Bolt, Leaves Nissan Leaf Author Liberty Access TechnologiesPosted on March 25, 2019Categories Electric Vehicle News Source: Electric Vehicle News The electric crossover gets its Australian review as deliveries are set to begin.This could be the most hilarious review of the Hyundai Kona Electric ever. And although it’s light-hearted, it’s also informative. Done in an Aussie accent — the electric crossover will be available Down Under after some paperwork gets taken care of — the CarsGuide host, Richard Berry, takes pains to answer his audience’s most pressing questions about the car, while demonstrating its significant abilities.More about the Hyundai Kona Electric Plugged In: First U.S. Kona Electric Delivery, Hyundai EV Strategy Paperwork Holding Up Hyundai Kona Electric Release In Australia The video begins by sharing the results of a poll that showed what viewers wanted to know most about the Kona Electric: its full-charge range, price, which features it offered, and then finally, its practicality. Berry answers those questions, of course, but begins by discussing styling, sharing several glamour shots from various angles and giving us a good look at the two-tone teal-with-white roof example. This includes a shot of the rear at the 1:48-minute mark which gives us a nice view of how the battery sits at the bottom of the chassis.We then get some bad news: the price. According to our host, the battery-powered beastie starts at $59,990 Australian dollars ($42,670). That, he notes, is a far cry from the cost of the petrol-powered version. The base price on the fossil fuel burner is $25,990 Australian dollars ($18,485). To make matters worse, the country isn’t known for its generous electric vehicle incentive programs, either.It’s worth pointing out that here that there are differences between the two versions that help close the perceived value gap, including performance, appearance, and environmental benefits. The internal combustion Kona is markedly slower and gets pretty lousy fuel economy for a small vehicle (27 mpg combined), for instance.Our protagonist pronounces that the Kona Electric gets 449 kilometers (279 miles) of travel from a full battery. As you can see on our Compare EVs page, this is a bit more optimistic than the EPA estimation of 415 km (258 miles). Now, this is where the comedy kicks in. To demonstrate its far-ranging capability, Berry takes the crossover on a journey, which he presents in a “dramatic re-enactment.” Emphasis on dramatic. The ends result? Some good laughs and an impressive return in range figures.There’s a lot packed into this review that clocks in at under 15 minutes. In the end, our host seems impressed by the car overall and gives it a great score: 8 out of a possible 10. If you’re interested in the Hyundai Kona Electric, or any other vehicle in this class for that matter, it’s probably worth the small time investment to hit that play button at the top of the page. Enjoy!last_img read more

VE Works on TPG Affiliates 220M IPO

first_img Lost your password? New York-based TPG RE Finance Trust, a REIT (real estate investment trust), said Monday evening that it priced its IPO at $220 million. The company is offering 11 million shares of common stock at $20 per share. It began trading today on the New York Stock Exchange under the ticker, “TRTX . . .You must be a subscriber to The Texas Lawbook to access this content. Password Remember mecenter_img Username Not a subscriber? Sign up for The Texas Lawbook.last_img

Updated Next Round in Hopper Familys 8B Probate Battle Against JP Morgan

first_img Lost your password? Remember me Not a subscriber? Sign up for The Texas Lawbook. Jo Hopper and her step-children won an $8 billion jury verdict against J.P. Morgan last year over the handling of her late husband’s estate. But a fight over attorneys’ fees in a Dallas probate court this week shows the real battle is just beginning. Natalie Posgate has the details in The Texas Lawbook.You must be a subscriber to The Texas Lawbook to access this content.center_img Password Usernamelast_img read more

Suspect in US2 Chase Forced Vehicles Off HighwayTransportation Budget Signed By GovGas

first_imgSheriff’s Deputies finally caught an 18 year old man last Saturday who eluded them by driving into oncoming traffic and exceeding 100 mph from Wenatchee to Coles Corner.The Wenatchee World reported the Chelan County Sheriff’s Office said no one was injured when the suspect, Salvador Esquivel-Montez reportedly forced several vehicles off the road to avoid a collision.  Deputies and State Patrol were involved but backed off on their pursuit as the suspect approached Leavenworth.The suspect and his 19-year-old girlfriend Itzayana Morfin of Pasco were arrested when the pickup ran out of gas.The couple is suspected of stealing a pickup in Pasco and vehicle prowls in Ellensburg last week.  The truck was spotted in Wenatchee on Saturday morning.Esquivel-Montez is being held in Chelan County on suspicion of possession of stolen property and theft charges and attempting to elude police.   Morfin is being held at Kittitas County Jail on suspicion of trafficking stolen property and vehicle prowl.last_img read more

Study identifies new genes linked to heart function and development

first_img Source:https://www.sgul.ac.uk/news/news-archive/researchers-discover-new-genes-associated-with-heart-function Jul 17 2018A new study from an international research team, led by Dr Yalda Jamshidi at St George’s, University of London, has identified new genes associated with heart function and development.An electrocardiogram (ECG), which records a heart’s rhythm and electrical activity, can be used to identify life-threatening heart problems which often have a strong genetic basis. The team compared ECGs and the genetic makeup of almost 200,000 individuals to gain insight into the genetics that underlie heart rhythm. This was done using large-scale genetic association studies focusing on protein-coding parts of the genome. They chose to focus on rare variants that are often missed in large scale population studies, for follow-up.The results, published in Genome Biology, confirmed previously-known associations between genetic regions and the heart’s electrical signature, but also highlighted rare gene variants found in less than 1% of the population.The team focused on one particular protein, ADAMTS6, to investigate further. Very little is currently known about its function. In a series of experiments in cells, to characterize the consequences of carrying a rare genetic variant in ADAMTS6, they found that the protein is not secreted as well as a fully functional copy of the gene.Furthermore, using mouse models, the study showed that carrying only one copy of a poorly functioning gene resulted in a decrease in Connexin 43, the molecule that transmits the electrical signal between adjacent heart cells and is essential for the cells to communicate. This decrease could be responsible for the subtle changes in heart rhythm seen in the population study.Related StoriesResearch opens possibility of developing single-dose gene therapy for inherited arrhythmiasMaternal proximity to oil and gas areas associated with congenital heart defects in babiesStroke should be treated 15 minutes earlier to save lives, study suggestsHowever, when both copies were not functional, it resulted in complete absence of Connexin 43 and serious problems in heart development.Dr Yalda Jamshidi, Reader in Genomic Medicine, said: “These findings increase our knowledge of the genes involved in regulation of heart rhythm, and suggest that whilst carrying a single rare damaging variant in ADAMTS6 may result in only subtle changes in electrical activity of the heart, carrying two copies could be a cause of congenital heart defects which affect up to 8 in every 1,000 babies born in the UK.”Greater knowledge of the genes determining normal heart rhythm will support efforts to develop new drugs to treat abnormal heart rhythms, but first “further work will be needed to fully characterize the function of the genes identified in our study” said Dr Jamshidi.Professor Jeremy Pearson, Associate Medical Director at the British Heart Foundation, which funded the study, said: “Right now, we estimate that there are around 620,000 people in the UK carrying any one of dozens of faulty genes that could kill them – genes that put them at higher risk of premature coronary heart disease or sudden cardiac arrest.””BHF-funded research has led to identification of many of these genes but there is still an urgent need for better diagnosis of genetic heart conditions so that people get the advice or treatment they need to prevent a tragedy. The results from the current study are another step towards achieving that goal.” ​last_img read more

Review Omega 3 supplements do not reduce risk of heart disease stroke

first_imgJul 18 2018New evidence published today shows there is little or no effect of omega 3 supplements on our risk of experiencing heart disease, stroke or death. Omega 3 is a type of fat. Small amounts of omega 3 fats are essential for good health, and they can be found in the food that we eat. The main types of omega 3 fatty acids are; alpha­linolenic acid (ALA), eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). ALA is normally found in fats from plant foods, such as nuts and seeds (walnuts and rapeseed are rich sources). EPA and DHA, collectively called long chain omega 3 fats, are naturally found in fatty fish, such as salmon and fish oils including cod liver oil.Increased consumption of omega 3 fats is widely promoted globally because of a common belief that it will protect against heart disease. There is more than one possible mechanism for how they might help prevent heart disease, including reducing blood pressure or reducing cholesterol. Omega 3 fats are readily available as over-the-counter supplements and they are widely bought and used.A new Cochrane systematic review, published today in the Cochrane Library, combines the results of seventy-nine randomized trials involving 112,059 people. These studies assessed effects of consuming additional omega 3 fat, compared to usual or lower omega 3, on diseases of the heart and circulation. Twenty-five studies were assessed as highly trustworthy because they were well designed and conducted.The studies recruited men and women, some healthy and others with existing illnesses from North America, Europe, Australia and Asia. Participants were randomly assigned to increase their omega 3 fats or to maintain their usual intake of fat for at least a year. Most studies investigated the impact of giving a long-chain omega 3 supplement in a capsule form and compared it to a dummy pill. Only a few assessed whole fish intake. Most ALA trials added omega 3 fats to foods such as margarine and gave these enriched foods, or naturally ALA-rich foods such as walnuts, to people in the intervention groups, and usual (non-enriched) foods to other participants.The Cochrane researchers found that increasing long-chain omega 3 provides little if any benefit on most outcomes that they looked at. They found high certainty evidence that long-chain omega 3 fats had little or no meaningful effect on the risk of death from any cause. The risk of death from any cause was 8.8% in people who had increased their intake of omega 3 fats, compared with 9% in people in the control groups.They also found that taking more long-chain omega 3 fats (including EPA and DHA), primarily through supplements probably makes little or no difference to risk of cardiovascular events, coronary heart deaths, coronary heart disease events, stroke or heart irregularities. Long-chain omega 3 fats probably did reduce some blood fats, triglycerides and HDL cholesterol. Reducing triglycerides is likely to be protective of heart diseases, but reducing HDL has the opposite effect. The researchers collected information on harms from the studies, but information on bleeding and blood clots was very limited.Related StoriesStroke should be treated 15 minutes earlier to save lives, study suggestsRepurposing a heart drug could increase survival rate of children with ependymomaCutting around 300 calories a day protects the heart even in svelte adultsThe systematic review suggests that eating more ALA through food or supplements probably has little or no effect on cardiovascular deaths or deaths from any cause. However, eating more ALA probably reduces the risk of heart irregularities from 3.3 to 2.6%. The review team found that reductions in cardiovascular events with ALA were so small that about 1000 people would need to increase consumption of ALA for one of them to benefit. Similar results were found for cardiovascular death. They did not find enough data from the studies to be able to measure the risk of bleeding or blood clots from using ALA.Increasing long-chain omega 3 or ALA probably does not affect body weight or fatness.Cochrane lead author, Dr. Lee Hooper from the University of East Anglia, UK said: “We can be confident in the findings of this review which go against the popular belief that long-chain omega 3 supplements protect the heart. This large systematic review included information from many thousands of people over long periods. Despite all this information, we don’t see protective effects.”The review provides good evidence that taking long-chain omega 3 (fish oil, EPA or DHA) supplements does not benefit heart health or reduce our risk of stroke or death from any cause. The most trustworthy studies consistently showed little or no effect of long-chain omega 3 fats on cardiovascular health. On the other hand, while oily fish is a healthy food, it is unclear from the small number of trials whether eating more oily fish is protective of our hearts.”This systematic review did find moderate evidence that ALA, found in plant oils (such as rapeseed or canola oil) and nuts (particularly walnuts) may be slightly protective of some diseases of the heart and circulation. However, the effect is very small, 143 people would need to increase their ALA intake to prevent one person developing arrhythmia. One thousand people would need to increase their ALA intake to prevent one person dying of coronary heart disease or experiencing a cardiovascular event. ALA is an essential fatty acid, an important part of a balanced diet, and increasing intakes may be slightly beneficial for prevention or treatment of cardiovascular disease.” Source:http://www.uea.ac.uk/last_img read more

New blood test helps patients with traumatic head injury to avoid costly

first_imgJul 26 2018Research conducted at the Wayne State University School of Medicine has helped confirm the effectiveness of a blood biomarker that can indicate if patients with a head injury can avoid a costly CT scan because the blood test results indicate no traumatic brain injury (TBI).The findings, published online in The Lancet Neurology on July 24, validated the use of a diagnostic blood test developed by Banyan Biomarkers Inc. to rule out the need for a head CT scan in patients 18 years and older with suspected TBI. The results support the potential clinical role of the biomarker test to dramatically reduce the need to order CT scans of the head, cutting patient exposure to radiation and health care costs for unnecessary scans.The multi-site study, “Serum GFAP and UCH-L1 in prediction of absence of intracranial injuries on head CT (ALERT-TBI): a multicenter observational study,” indicated that the Banyan Brain Trauma Indicator, or Banyan BTI™, correctly identified 99.6 percent of patients who did not have a TBI on head CT scans in more than 1,900 adults presenting to emergency departments in the United States and Europe, said Robert Welch, M.D., M.S., the Brooks F. Bock, M.D., Endowed Professor of Emergency Medicine for Wayne State University.”This study is exciting for a few reasons. This is the largest study of any biomarker for TBI that has been performed in the United States and provides robustness of the findings compared to many earlier smaller studies,” Dr. Welch said. “Our results were the basis for the first FDA approved blood biomarker panel that will aid in the diagnosis and care of patients with mild TBI. To a certain degree, this has been a holy grail for quite some time.””Once a commercially available product is released, I suspect these two biomarkers will become an important component of clinical care of patients with head injury and suspected TBI,” he added.Wayne State University was the top enrolling site in the multi-center study, he said.Related StoriesMathematical model helps quantify metastatic cell behaviorDon’t Miss the Blood-Brain Barrier Drug Delivery (B3DD) Summit this AugustTAU’s new Translational Medical Research Center acquires MILabs’ VECTor PET/SPECT/CTThe biomarkers, Ubiquitin Carboxy-terminal Hydrolase-L1 (UCH-L1) and Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein (GFAP), are detected in the blood soon after a brain injury. In February, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration granted marketing authorization to Banyan Biomarkers for the commercialization of Banyan BTI™ to aid in the evaluation of patients with suspected TBIs. The Banyan BTI is the first and only biomarker that has been approved for use in TBI by the FDA.The results demonstrate that the two blood-based brain biomarkers can predict the absence of intracranial injury and reduce unnecessary head CT scanning, thereby reducing radiation exposure and health care costs while improving patient care and emergency department efficiency, the study said. The biomarkers are especially useful in mild forms of TBI, such as concussions suffered during athletics.An estimated 54 million to 60 million people worldwide sustain a TBI annually. In the United States, more than 2.5 million people are diagnosed with TBI each year, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, most of those concussions. CT scans of the head are the common diagnostic choices for such cases, contributing to the nearly 20 million head CT scans conducted annually in the U.S. that cost more than $76 billion each year.The widespread use of head CT scans has been questioned because of the potential adverse effects of radiation exposure, unnecessary emergency department resource use and the cost of the scans. Clinical decision rules developed to reduce unnecessary head CT scans have had minimal effect.The study’s results suggest that as many as one-third of head CT scans performed in the acute setting for TBI can be avoided altogether. The clinical use of the GFAP and UCH-L1 biomarker test has the potential to reduce unnecessary head CT scans, and avoid their attendant radiation exposure and costs, Dr. Welch said. Source:http://research.wayne.edu/news/new-diagnostic-blood-test-helps-rule-out-need-for-ct-scans-in-some-patients-with-possible-traumatic-brain-injuries-31410last_img read more

New nanooptic endoscopes offer highresolution imaging at extended depth of focus

first_imgJul 31 2018The diagnosis of diseases based in internal organs often relies on biopsy samples collected from affected regions. But collecting such samples is highly error-prone due to the inability of current endoscopic imaging techniques to accurately visualize sites of disease. The conventional optical elements in catheters used to access hard-to-reach areas of the body, such as the gastrointestinal tract and pulmonary airways, are prone to aberrations that obstruct the full capabilities of optical imaging.Now, experts in endoscopic imaging at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) and pioneers of flat metalens technology at the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS), have teamed up to develop a new class of endoscopic imaging catheters – termed nano-optic endoscopes – that overcome the limitations of current systems.The research is described in Nature Photonics.”Clinical adoption of many cutting-edge endoscopic microscopy modalities has been hampered due to the difficulty of designing miniature catheters that achieve the same image quality as bulky desktop microscopes,” said Melissa Suter, an assistant professor of Medicine at MGH and Harvard Medical School (HMS) and co-senior author of the paper. “The use of nano-optic catheters that incorporate metalenses into their design will likely change the landscape of optical catheter design, resulting in a dramatic increase in the quality, resolution, and functionality of endoscopic microscopy. This will ultimately increase clinical utility by enabling more sophisticated assessment of cell and tissue microstructure in living patients.””Metalenses based on flat optics are a game changing new technology because the control of image distortions necessary for high resolution imaging is straightforward compared to conventional optics, which requires multiple complex shaped lenses,” said Federico Capasso, the Robert L. Wallace Professor of Applied Physics and Vinton Hayes Senior Research Fellow in Electrical Engineering at SEAS and co-senior author of the paper. “I am confident that this will lead to a new class of optical systems and instruments with a broad range of applications in many areas of science and technology”Related StoriesBacteria in the birth canal linked to lower risk of ovarian cancerTrends in colonoscopy rates not aligned with increase in early onset colorectal cancerHow cell-free DNA can be targeted to prevent spread of tumors”The versatility and design flexibility of the nano-optic endoscope significantly elevates endoscopic imaging capabilities and will likely impact diagnostic imaging of internal organs,” said Hamid Pahlevaninezhad, Instructor in Medicine at MGH and HMS and co-first author of the paper. “We demonstrated an example of such capabilities to achieve high-resolution imaging at greatly extended depth of focus.”To demonstrate the imaging quality of the nano-optic endoscope, the researchers imaged fruit flesh, swine and sheep airways, and human lung tissue. The team showed that the nano-optic endoscope can image deep into the tissue with significantly higher resolution than provided by current imaging catheter designs.The images captured by the nano-optic endoscope clearly show cellular structures in fruit flesh and tissue layers and fine glands in the bronchial mucosa of swine and sheep. In the human lung tissue, the researchers were able to clearly identify structures that correspond to fine, irregular glands indicating the presence of adenocarcinoma, the most prominent type of lung cancer.”Currently, we are at the mercy of materials that we have no control over to design high resolution lenses for imaging,” said Yao-Wei Huang, a postdoctoral fellow at SEAS and co-first author of the paper. “The main advantage of the metalens is that we can design and tailor its specifications to overcome spherical aberrations and astigmatism and achieve very fine focus of the light. As a result, we achieve very high resolution with extended depth of field without the need for complex optical components.”Next, researchers aim to explore other applications for the nano-optic endoscope, including a polarization-sensitive nano-optic endoscope, which could contrast between tissues that have highly-organized structures, such as smooth muscle, collagen and blood vessels.Source: https://www.seas.harvard.edu/news/2018/07/nano-optic-endoscope-sees-deep-into-tissue-at-high-resolutionlast_img read more

Half as many people are trying heroin but marijuana use grows

first_imgJenny Gold: jgold@kff.org, @JennyAGold Reviewed by Kate Anderton, B.Sc. (Editor)Sep 14 2018Some good news from the front lines of the heroin crisis: Half as many people tried heroin for the first time in 2017 as in 2016. That’s according to data released Friday from the government’s annual National Survey on Drug Use and Health.”This is what we were hoping for,” said Dr. Elinore McCance-Katz, who directs the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. “It tells us that we are getting the word out to the American people of the risks of heroin,” especially when the drug is tainted with additional powerful opioids, fentanyl or carfentanil.The survey found that marijuana use, however, increased in 2017, especially among pregnant women and young adults. McCance-Katz said the increase was likely linked to the growing number of states that have legalized marijuana and the misperception that marijuana is harmless.McCance-Katz attributed the drop in new heroin users to increased government funding for prevention and public messaging on the local, state and federal levels.Dr. David Kan, president of the California Society of Addiction Medicine, was surprised by the heroin finding. “This report seems to run counter to the common wisdom that everyone is migrating from prescription medications to heroin,” he said. Still, the number of drug overdose deaths continued to climb to a staggering 72,000 in 2017, with the sharpest increase among people who used fentanyl or other synthetic opioids. “All it takes is one exposure to fentanyl to die,” Kan said.The survey also found a small increase in the number of people with substance use disorders who receive specialty treatment, particularly heroin and opioid users. Nonetheless, 92 percent of people needing such treatment do not receive it.”It’s unacceptable,” said Greg Williams, executive vice president of Facing Addiction, a nonprofit group that advocates for people struggling with substance use disorders. “We’ve had a 90 percent treatment gap in America for the two decades we’ve been tracking it, and we have not been able to close it.” Despite all the news coverage of the drug crisis, he said, “the response has been woefully inadequate.”Related StoriesOpioids are major cause of pregnancy-related deaths in UtahFlorida is the latest Republican-led state to adopt clean needle exchangesCannabidiol reduces cue-induced craving and anxiety in individuals with history of heroin abuseAs for marijuana, it appears that public health messaging has not been as effective as marketing efforts by the burgeoning cannabis industry. “When you have an industry that does nothing but blanket our society with messages about the medicinal value of marijuana, people get the idea this is a safe substance to use. And that’s not true,” said McCance-Katz.Cannabis does appear to have medical benefits — in June, for example, the FDA approved the first cannabinoid-derived medication for the treatment of epilepsy. But McCance-Katz said there is already ample evidence that the drug can pose serious health risks, particularly for teenagers, young adults and pregnant women.The survey found that from 2015 to 2017 the percentage of pregnant women who reported marijuana use more than doubled, to 7.1 percent. Often, they use it to combat nausea and pain, believing it is safer than the FDA-approved drugs prescribed by their doctors. Mounting evidence, however, suggests that marijuana can cause preterm birth and long-term neurological problems in the babies of mothers who use it during pregnancy.”I’m going to talk about it every chance I get,” said McCance-Katz. “Americans have the right to know that marijuana has risks.” This article was reprinted from khn.org with permission from the Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation. Kaiser Health News, an editorially independent news service, is a program of the Kaiser Family Foundation, a nonpartisan health care policy research organization unaffiliated with Kaiser Permanente.last_img read more

Updated US House passes controversial bill on NSF research

first_img Email Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) “At its core, this bill is about second guessing our Nation’s best and brightest scientists, and the grant making decisions they make,” said Rep. Eddie Bernice Johnson (D–TX), in a statement. “[M]y biggest concern about these new requirements is they will push NSF reviewers to fund less high-risk research, which, by its very nature entails the pursuit of scientific understanding without necessarily any particular or known benefit.”Paul Basken of The Chronicle of Higher Education has more on the debate here.Here’s our preview story on the vote: Next week the U.S. House of Representatives is expected to repeat a warning to the National Science Foundation (NSF) that every one of its research grants must advance “the national interest.” Depending on whether you’re a Republican or a Democrat, passage of the Scientific Research in the National Interest Act (HR 3293) is either a simple reminder that federal dollars should be spent wisely, or an unwise and unwarranted intrusion into NSF’s grantsmaking process.HR 3293 repeats one section of controversial legislation laying out policy guidance for NSF that the House narrowly approved in May 2015. (That bill, HR 1806, is called the America COMPETES Reauthorization Act of 2015.) The Senate has yet to take up its version of COMPETES, although staff have been working on a draft for several weeks after collecting community input last year.Representative Lamar Smith (R–TX), chairman of the House science committee, has led the fight for both bills. He argues that they merely codify recent steps that NSF has taken to ensure “greater accountability” of the government’s investment in basic research. After scientific organizations complained that earlier versions of the COMPETES reauthorization would have forced NSF to follow congressionally written rules for making awards, Smith added language to the current bills that says “nothing in this section shall be constructed as altering the Foundation’s [two criteria] for evaluating grant applications.”Democrats don’t believe him. They think that the legislation is a way to apply a political litmus test that would allow Smith and other Republicans to trim research by social scientists and those studying climate change. “The clear intent of the bill is to change how NSF makes funding decisions, according to what some majority members believe should or shouldn’t be funded,” says Representative Eddie Bernice Johnson (D–TX), the top Democrat on the science panel. Citing several grants that Smith and others have called frivolous or worse, Johnson also worries that the legislation, if passed, will make researchers less likely to propose bold ideas out of fear that their work will be publicly ridiculed.A vote on HR 3293 is scheduled for 10 February. The larger and more comprehensive COMPETES bill passed last year by a margin of 217 to 205, with 23 Republicans voting against it and no Democrats in favor. Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwecenter_img *Update, 11 February, 8:30 a.m.: As expected, the House of Representatives yesterday passed HR 3293 by a 236 to 178 vote. Lawmakers voted largely along party lines, with just seven Democrats voting in favor of the bill and four Republicans against. After the Wednesday vote, leaders of the House science committee’s majority and minority blocs issued dueling statements. “This bill ensures that a project’s benefits are clearly communicated to earn the public’s support and trust,” said Representative Lamar Smith (R–TX), the science panel’s chairperson and the bill’s major backer, in a statement. “Researchers should embrace the opportunity to better explain to the American people the potential value of their work. This bill is an essential step to restore and maintain taxpayer support for basic scientific research.” Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Countrylast_img read more

North American mountains get almost triple the snow previously thought

first_imgBrian Peterson/Star Tribune via Associated Press North American mountains get almost triple the snow previously thought By Sid PerkinsMar. 15, 2018 , 12:30 PMcenter_img Snowboarders, rejoice! North America gets a lot more snow than previously presumed—so much that each year if spread evenly across the continent, it would add up to about 19 centimeters. And if piled up only in Ohio, the snow would be a whopping 45 meters deep (about the height of the Statue of Liberty, sans its pedestal).  Those figures come thanks to a new analysis in which researchers used computer simulations to estimate the typical annual snowfall in each of 11 North American mountain ranges. After supercomputer simulations of regional climate that would have taken 50 years on the average laptop, the team found that those mountain ranges receive about 3018 cubic kilometers of snow a year. Although those ranges together cover only about 25% of the area stretching from the Arctic Ocean down to Mexico’s southern border, they get about 60% of its snow, the researchers report in Geophysical Research Letters. That’s nearly three times the estimate for mountain snow from one previous study, the team notes.When the researchers combined their new estimate with another team’s value for snow in the continent’s nonmountainous areas, they reckon that North America each year gets about 5052 cubic kilometers of snow—enough to cover unglaciated areas of the continent to a depth of about 6.4 centimeters (2.5 inches) of water once it melts. Good luck when that refreezes, New England.last_img read more

Want to crowdfund your science New study hints at who is successful

first_img Atmospheric scientist Maria Zatko was close to completing her thesis on ground-level ozone in 2014 when she learned of a perfect opportunity to fill a gap in her research on this air pollutant.Zatko and her adviser at the University of Washington in Seattle realized she could join an ongoing research project in Utah that was studying causes of the area’s unusually high ozone levels during winter. Zatko wanted to measure the release of nitrogen oxides from snow. But collecting the snow samples would require a month of fieldwork, and Zatko had no funding to cover the costs.So Zatko decided to try an emerging source for research funding—online crowdfunding. Through a campaign on a website, Experiment.com, she raised $12,000. The cash was “critical” to completing her Ph.D., she says. “Even more important is how it has played out postgraduation,” she adds, because presenting the data at a conference led to her current job with an environmental consulting firm. “I’m just eternally grateful” to the 155 people who responded to her funding plea, she says. Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Want to crowdfund your science? New study hints at who is successful Lauren Easley Maria Zatko used this mass spectrometer in her crowdfunded research project when she was a Ph.D. student at the University of Washington in Seattle. By Jeffrey BrainardMar. 26, 2018 , 4:05 PMcenter_img Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Email Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Zatko fits the profile of scientists who have had success with Experiment.com campaigns, according a new study. Women have a higher success rate than men, and a majority were led by students, found scholars who wrote the study for The National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER), a nonprofit group in Cambridge, Massachusetts, that supports economics studies relevant to public policy.In one of the largest studies of its kind, the researchers studied 728 campaigns conducted on Experiment.com, the biggest crowdfunding platform specifically for research. (It was founded in 2012 under a different name.) The site allows scientists to set a funding goal, but the project receives the money only if the goal is met. Experiment.com, a for-profit enterprise, retains 8% of funds raised. The website’s staff provides some review of projects before posting them, and most campaigns last 30 to 60 days.Almost half of the studied projects met their targets and received funding, the researchers found. But students and postdocs had higher success rates than tenured faculty members, even after controlling for the fact that the junior people tended to ask for less money.Requests for help typically focused on travel and lab costs as well as equipment and fees for publication and conferences. And the median amount raised was relatively modest, just $3100. That reflected the small amounts requested—most target amounts were less than $15,000. Only three projects requested more than $100,000, one of which was an outlier: a project led by Hollywood producer Gordon Gray sought $1 million to develop treatments for Batten disease, a rare, inherited neurodegenerative disease. It raised $2.6 million.What makes for a successful campaign? A statistical analysis by the NBER authors found that project leaders who worked actively to solicit contributions had higher success rates and raised larger sums than those who didn’t. That active engagement included posting online endorsements from experienced scientists and others, providing compelling “lab notes” containing updates and project background, and offering donors a nonmonetary reward such as visits to the research lab and, in the case of wildlife studies, offering photographs of subject animals.Such outreach takes time and effort, which scientists need to weigh against the modest dollar amounts they are likely to raise. “You can’t just put out a project and you wake up the next morning and have $10,000 in the bank,” says one of the authors, Henry Sauermann of the European School of Management and Technology in Berlin.Zatko can attest to the work involved to spread the word. She knew about half of her donors, she says, and had sent many of them emails asking for help. And preparing an appealing pitch that described her research was eye-opening. “That was one of the first times when I was forced to explain my project in layman’s terms,” she recalls. “For most of the Ph.D., I was really down in the weeds. It was so nice to take a step back and think about how this affects the broader community.”In Zatko’s case, she says the support did produce a finding that could benefit society at large: She concluded that chemical reactions in snow were making only a minimal contribution to the region’s ozone pollution, compared with emissions coming from natural gas drilling. That could help policymakers better focus their efforts to improve air quality.Although she encourages others to consider crowdfunding, Zatko says, “I really wish there was more funding for scientists, so people didn’t have to go down this path. For already stressed Ph.D.s, this is one more stressor. Until it’s funded—and then it’s awesome.”To be sure, the dollar amounts provided by crowdfunding are far smaller than those typically obtained from government or private grants. But “the point is not to replace traditional [funding] mechanisms,” Sauermann says. Rather, crowdfunding can be a complementary source “that can fill gaps or expands access” to funding for researchers—such as early career scientists or those working in meagerly funded fields—who “traditionally wouldn’t have had those grant opportunities.”last_img read more

Researchers launch plan to sequence 66000 species in the United Kingdom But

first_img Email Researchers launch plan to sequence 66,000 species in the United Kingdom. But that’s just a start The red squirrel will be one of the 66,000 species to have its genome sequenced by the Darwin Tree of Life Project. By Erik StokstadNov. 1, 2018 , 3:15 PM LONDON—In the first attempt of its kind, researchers plan to sequence all known species of eukaryotic life—66,000 species of animals, plants, fungi, and protozoa—in a single country, the United Kingdom. The announcement was made here today at the official launch of an even grander $4.7 billion global effort, called the Earth BioGenome Project (EBP), to sequence the genomes of all of Earth’s known 1.5 million species of eukaryotes within a decade.“We feel it is the next moonshot for biology,” says EBP project chair Harris Lewin, a genomicist at the University of California, Davis. Researchers say the genomes will provide multiple benefits, including new insights into the evolution, assisting in biodiversity conservation, and benefiting agriculture and medicine.In terms of genomes sequenced, the eukaryotes—the branch of complex life consisting of organisms with cells that have a nucleus inside a membrane—lag far behind the bacteria and archaea. Researchers have sequenced just about 3500 eukaryotic genomes, and only 100 at high quality. In 2015, EBP’s founders hatched the idea to massively expand these numbers. “This was an effort that bubbled up from scientists wanting to know more about how the world works,” says John Kress of the Smithsonian Institution’s National Museum of Natural History in Washington, D.C., a co-chair of the project’s working group. Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Countrycenter_img Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe BarbAnna/Getty Images This group, which includes about 25 scientists, has developed a strategy for coordinating the many efforts around the world that are sequencing the genomes of various taxonomic groups, such as vertebrates or plants, and geographically focused efforts tackling the genomes of key or iconic species found within a single nation’s borders. The project will set standards for genome quality, data curations, and other aspects.The U.K. sequencing effort—dubbed The Darwin Tree of Life project—will now become part of the EBP mix. The Wellcome Sanger Institute in Hinxton, U.K., says it plans to sequence all known 66,000 species of eukaryotes found within the United Kingdom, except for its overseas territories. Collaborators will include the European Molecular Biology Laboratory in Hinxton, the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew in the United Kingdom, and the Natural History Museum in London. Sanger will spend up to £50 million over 8 years, about 4% of its annual budget, on the first phase of the project, which will focus on developing the processes for sample collection, R&D on sequencing, and computational methods for assembling the genomes. Sanger director Mike Stratton said he expects another £100 million will be needed over the next 5 to 7 years for the bulk of sample collections and sequencing.This year, as a proof of principle, and to celebrate its 25th anniversary, the institute sequenced 25 genomes. The list includes a wide range of iconic, cryptic, “flourishing,” and “floundering” species. The starfish proved to be the most difficult, says Sanger’s Daniel Mead, who coordinated the effort. One lesson was that sample preparation—extracting the DNA to sequence—will be one of the more challenging parts of the Darwin project.Sanger is considering various approaches for how to organize its sequencing work. For example, researchers could select all species within particular taxonomic group, which could inform understanding of their evolution. Another idea is to sequence the genomes of all eukaryotes found within certain places—such as Wytham Woods, a research forest near the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom—where existing ecological knowledge could add value. As with EBP, however, Sanger’s first phase will aim to collect and sequence one representative from each of the 3849 taxonomic families found in the British Isles. “We will be making a major contribution to the Earth BioGenome Project, far greater than the size of the U.K.,” Stratton said.“I love the ambition” of the Darwin Tree of Life project, says Katherine Belov, a geneticist at The University of Sydney in Australia. “It’s going to be a massive effort.” She hopes it will inspire other countries to do the same. Belov participates in the several projects affiliated with EBP and today announced that Australian institutions will over the next 5 years sequence the genomes of 50 threatened and endangered species.Also announced today was a memorandum of understanding for participating in EBP. It has been signed by 19 institutions, including BGI Shenzhen, China; the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew; and Sanger. More than a dozen projects, such as the Global Invertebrate Genomics Alliance, with collaborators at multiple institutions are also affiliated. Coordination is key in achieving such an ambitious goal, Lewin says. “Unless we all take a stake in getting to the end, it will never happen.”Lewin says the partners now have about a third of the funding on hand to complete the first phase of the EBP project. This phase, which will include sequencing genomes of one species from each of 9000 taxonomic families, should cost about $600 million over 3 years. Lewin expects the rest of the funding for the first phase will be secured within a year. In years 4 to 7, genomes would be sequenced from representatives of each genus, followed by the remainder of the species. “Now, our task is to persuade the National Science Foundation—and a lot of others—that the Earth BioGenome Project will be the next moonshot,” Kress says.last_img read more

How to Make Someone Desire You Ancient Egyptian Love Spell Decoded

first_imgA university researcher has decoded a mysterious fragment of a 1,300-year-old Egyptian papyrus and proclaimed it is a love spell. In fact, the spell might have once been part of a magician’s handbook. After studying the images and the text, Dr. Korshi Dosoo from the University of Strasbourg in France said they “may be understood as a representation of a ritual intended to unite two lovers.” The analysis “draws comparisons with other similar papyrus artifacts and known rituals of the time to suggest that this was a recipe for love, and possibly protection, between two people,” according to Live Science.Stone with Coptic inscription. Photo by Imran CC BY-SA 3.0The image is of two bird-like creatures, connected by what could be a phallus, Dosoo said. Or, he speculated, it could be a chain. The text in the fragment is written in Coptic, an Egyptian language that uses the Greek alphabet.Any thought of ancient mummies and Egyptian gods being involved in the spell is mistaken. The fragment was written at a time when Christianity was practiced in Egypt.Cairo, EgyptAnd the phrases that Dr. Dosoo deciphered say things like “I call upon you… who is Christ the god of Israel…,” followed by the words “you will dissolve… every child of Adam…” There is also mention of the Biblical character Ahitophel, who deserted King David, which “hints that the incantation is designed to avoid such bad influences.”“Christian literary texts from Egypt which mention love spells often imply that the problem is not that the woman doesn’t love the man per se, but that he does not have access to her, because she is a young unmarried girl protected and secluded by her family, or already married to someone else,” Dosoo said in an interview.EFFY ALEXAKIS / MACQUARIE UNIVERSITYThere are clues that this is a love spell. The fact that the figures face each other is one. There’s also mention of an exotic deer musk perfume, which at the time was supposed to bring lovers together.There is a larger mystery to this fragment — no one knows how, when, or why it ended up in Macquarie University in Sydney, Australia, where Dr. Dosoo studied it. The university stores approximately 900 papyri.“Experts have been busy trying to decipher the magic spells in the Macquarie University collection for years,” according to Live Science. “This text may be part of the Handbook of Ritual Power that was the subject of a similar study back in 2014.”Turin Erotic Papyrus.Most of the papyri were purchased by or donated to the university between 1972 and 1985. Many were purchased from Anton and Michael Fackelmann, who were antiquities dealers in Austria in the 1970s and 1980s.Among the papyri is what researchers call a Handbook of Ritual Power, along with magical text that is about 1,300 years old and also written in Coptic. It is possible that the love-spell fragment recently decoded is part of a similar handbook, written at the same time.Page from Iryan Moftah Coptic language grammar primer.That handbook told readers how to cast love spells, exorcise evil, and treat “black jaundice,” a sometimes fatal bacterial infection.In an interview in The Washington Post in 2014, Malcolm Choat and Iain Gardner, who are professors at Macquarie University and the University of Sydney, said the handbook was “a complete 20-page parchment codex, containing the handbook of a ritual practitioner.”The ancient handbook, a codex, “starts with a lengthy series of invocations that culminate with drawings and words of power,” they wrote. “These are followed by a number of prescriptions or spells to cure possession by spirits and various ailments, or to bring success in love and business.”To “subjugate” someone, the handbook says, you would say a magical formula over two nails and then “drive them into his doorpost, one on the right side (and) one on the left.”Read another story from us: The Egyptian Mummy Wrapped in a Manuscript from Ancient ItalyThe practitioner of the handbook didn’t have to be a priest or monk. “It is my sense that there were ritual practitioners outside the ranks of the clergy and monks, but exactly who they were is shielded from us by the fact that people didn’t really want to be labeled as a ‘magician,’ ” Choat said.last_img read more

DEAR BELLA I have a problem with how some fat people dress

first_imgShareTweetSharePinBella,Before I get thrown under the bus by readers let me say that I don’t have a problem with fat people. The problem I have is with the way some of them dress.Bella, yesterday, I was somewhere in town and if I wasn’t sure that there was no such observance, I would say it was the Fat Disgraceful People Day.Heavy women with short shorts under their butts and the darkness between their thigh are so prevalent.After seeing one of them struggle to enter a van, a few blocks down I saw another woman…she must have been 300 pounds. The lady was wearing a jeans and all her behind expose. Poor jeans couldn’t even sit well on her body.Bella, alas. I’m not a hater. Thick women are beautifully made but they must know and be told how to dress.I sometimes wonder whether nobody at their home sees them and can point things out or even they themselves look in the mirror.I know a lot of plump women in Dominica who dress well. Cover up and look sexy. But some fat women dress disgracefully.I never liked fat and the kind of anger I am beginning to feel towards them, I am beginning to think maybe it is me with the mental issue.Do you think me not liking the fat, skimpily dressed image makes me a hater? Or is it okay to feel that way?Let me add that these huge women are always seen stuffing their face and that drives me crazy too.Fat Hater.…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….Hello Fat Hater,I have seen plus size women dress in ways that are not becoming.I have seen slim women do the same thing. It’s really about how people feel in what they wear.But losing sleep over what another person wears and how they look, is a bit extreme.Just ensure that whenever you wear compliments your size and shape because really, however a person decides to dress up or dress down has everything to do with them and not you.BellaHave a problem? Write to Dear Bella at news@dominicanewsonline.com. Dear Bella is published every Monday. All letters are subject to editing and the editor has the right to not publish an article if it does not meet the company’s editorial standards. Also, the advice given is not necessarily expert advice and is basically an opinion, therefore we accept no liability that results from giving any opinion. As such we encourage you to seek the advice of a professional counselor.last_img read more

First real snowfall of the winter season

first_imgFebruary 27, 2018 Photo by Mich LundgrenIt was late in coming but the region experienced its first real snowfall of the winter season just weeks before spring. The snowfall brought with it a beautiful change of scenery like that pictured here before melting. Temperatures will remain on the cool side this week with possible light snowfall today. RelatedSubscribe or log in to read the rest of this content. Bottom Adcenter_img First real snowfall of the winter seasonlast_img